International Research Units

TGHN

The Global Health Network

The Global Health Network is an innovative digital platform aiming to enable research by sharing knowledge and methods. We accelerate and streamline research, facilitating collaboration and resource sharing across global health. On our digital platform you can find member areas, each a specific research community of practice, who use this space to work, disseminate and engage.

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MSc International Health and Tropical Medicine

The MSc in International Health and Tropical Medicine provides a multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary foundation in global health. This exciting new course embraces the breadth and complexity of global health challenges facing resource limited contexts and equips candidates with the tools and awareness to contribute to innovative solutions.

The Life Cycle of Malaria

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Fighting malaria is one of our major objectives. Many NDM scientists try to find new ways to help the millions of people worldwide who are affected by malaria. In our edutainment game, players role-play as mosquito or malaria parasite, and interact with different stages of the disease's life-cycle.

Donate to SMRU

Did you know that as part of Oxford University's Campaign, you can donate directly to Tropical Medicines unit on the Thai-Myanmar border?

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Latest News

Professor Nick White elected to the National Academy of Medicine

Professor Nick White elected to the National Academy of Medicine

Posted 17/10/2017

Congratulations to Professor Sir Nick White, elected to the National Academy of Medicine (US). Election to the Academy is considered one of the highest honors in the fields of health and medicine and recognizes individuals who have demonstrated outstanding professional achievement and commitment to service.

Using Mahidol's B. pseudomallei test to confirm melioidosis in the lab

Using Mahidol's B. pseudomallei test to confirm melioidosis in the lab

Posted 16/10/2017

Work at the Cambodia Oxford Medical Research Unit (COMRU) and Angkor Hospital for Children (AHC) has highlighted the importance of melioidosis, infection by the soil-dwelling bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei, as a cause of severe illness in Cambodian children (P Turner et al and Pagnarith et al).

New collaboration to tackle superbugs

New collaboration to tackle superbugs

Posted 13/10/2017

A new Oxford University collaboration between the BDI and the Centre for Tropical Medicine and Global Health will support understanding and action around one of the world’s biggest health threats, drug-resistant infections.

115 years of malaria in Africa

115 years of malaria in Africa

Posted 11/10/2017

Despite unprecedented decline since 2000, progress has stalled. A paper published in Nature today describes 115 years of malaria data collected in Africa by Professor Bob Snow. This article gives the most detailed picture yet of where efforts to control malaria infection are being won and lost across the continent.

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Podcast: Meet our Researchers

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Artemisinin therapy for malaria

Malaria is the most important parasitic disease of man. Although most of the deaths occur in Africa, drug resistance has emerged from South-East Asia. Artemisinins, which are plant-derived compounds originally from the Chinese Materia Medica, are still today the best treatment for malaria, however, other drugs are also showing promising results. Clinical trials are also undertaken to find out the correct doses. All these developments contribute to our progress in getting malaria under control, as explained by Professor Sir Nick White.

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Research highlights

Quantification of the association between malaria in pregnancy and stillbirth

Quantification of the association between malaria in pregnancy and stillbirth

Posted 17/10/2017

P falciparum and P vivax malaria in pregnancy both increase stillbirth risk, which is likely to increase as endemicity declines. A study by SMRU and University of Melbourne researchers shows that better P falciparum malaria control efforts could prevent up to 1 in 5 to 8 stillbirths in sub-Saharan Africa.

Local, national, and regional viral haemorrhagic fever pandemic potential in Africa

Local, national, and regional viral haemorrhagic fever pandemic potential in Africa

Posted 13/10/2017

In a paper published in The Lancet this week (12th October 2017), Professor Peter Horby outlines potential epidemics in Africa. It is difficult to predict when and where new epidemics might occur so we can be better prepared and have a proactive response. This modelling is based on information on each virus as well as governance, communication, ...

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