tropics map
Nepal Oxford Indonesia (Jakarta) Indonesia (Papua) Africa Asia Kenya (Nairobi) Tanzania Kenya (Kilifi) Thailand (Mae SOT) - SMRU Thailand (Bangkok) - MORU Lao PDR Viet Nam (Hanoi) Viet Nam (Ho Chi Minh) Cambodia (COMRU)

Tropical Medicine and Global Health

The Centre for Tropical Medicine and Global Health is a world leading Centre within the Nuffield Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Oxford, comprised of research groups who are permanently based in Africa and Asia as well as across two sites in Oxford. Our research ranges from clinical studies to behavioral sciences, with capacity building integral to all of our activities.

Our research is conducted at three Wellcome Trust Major Overseas Programmes in Kenya, Thailand and Viet Nam as well as a growing Centre in Oxford. The Centre for Tropical Medicine and Global Health also brings together a number of sister groups in Laos, Tanzania, Indonesia, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Myanmar, Cambodia and Nepal, as well as multiple collaborators around the world.

Tackling infectious diseases, which kill many millions of people every year, is one of the greatest challenges of the 21st century. We are researching solutions to the increasingly urgent problems these diseases cause.

MSc International Health and Tropical Medicine

The MSc in International Health and Tropical Medicine provides a multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary foundation in global health. This exciting new course embraces the breadth and complexity of global health challenges facing resource limited contexts and equips candidates with the tools and awareness to contribute to innovative solutions.

The Life Cycle of Malaria


Fighting malaria is one of our major objectives. Many NDM scientists try to find new ways to help the millions of people worldwide who are affected by malaria. In our edutainment game, players role-play as mosquito or malaria parasite, and interact with different stages of the disease's life-cycle.

Latest News

Birth attendant training course may be global model for safer birth care in poor communities

Birth attendant training course may be global model for safer birth care in poor communities

Posted 18/10/2016

11 October 2016, Mae Sot (Thailand) – Training local Karen and Burman women as skilled birth attendants in refugee settings resulted in no adverse perinatal outcomes and many positive outcomes such as a drop in stillbirths and infant deaths and more babies being born in clinics rather than at home, says a new study published in the scientific journal PLOS ONE

Professor Kevin Marsh recognised for contributions to health in Africa

Professor Kevin Marsh recognised for contributions to health in Africa

Posted 18/10/2016

Oxford Professor of Tropical Medicine Kevin Marsh is a principal investigator at the KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research Programme in Kilifi, Kenya, as well as senior adviser to the African Academy of Sciences. His award recognises his sustained efforts to control and eradicate malaria, which impacts the health of tens of millions of African children.

Ada Lovelace Day 2016

Ada Lovelace Day 2016

Posted 17/10/2016

Ada Lovelace was an English mathematician and writer, chiefly known for her work with Charles Babbage on the early mechanical general-purpose computer, the Analytical Engine. Ada Lovelace Day is an annual international event to celebrate the achievements of women in Science, Engineering, Technology and Maths.


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Podcast: Meet our Researchers


High altitude illness can be prevented by a simple rule: don't go too high, too fast.
Drugs can also be used, and Dr Buddha Basnyat showed that a much lower dose of Diamox, a commonly used drug, is as effective. His research also focusses on the effect of high altitude on pilgrims, an older, poorer and more vulnerable population.

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Research coverage

Ebola treatment centre_(c)CaitlinRyan_MSF 300

In Blueprint: How researchers from the Centre for Tropical Medicine and Global Health, including Professors Peter Horby and Trudie Lang, took a leading role in the research response against Ebola at the height of the crisis.

Donate to SMRU

Did you know that as part of Oxford University's Campaign, you can donate directly to Tropical Medicines unit on the Thai-Myanmar border?

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