Latest News

Blood test to track emergence of drug resistance in malaria parasites

Blood test to track emergence of drug resistance in malaria parasites

Posted 14/06/2012

Researchers have developed a new method for analysing the DNA of malaria parasites straight from patient blood samples. The technique will help identify hotspots of malaria parasite evolution and track the rise of malarial drug resistance faster and more efficiently than ever before, say the researchers from Oxford University and the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute near Cambridge.

Eastern African scientists pledge immediate action to confront the threat of malaria drug resistance

Posted 25/05/2012

More than forty leading Eastern African scientists meeting in Nairobi this week pledged to put aside national interests and bureaucratic barriers to tackle the potential threat of artemisinin drug resistant malaria in Africa.

New OxTREC Application System

Posted 25/05/2012

A new system has launched for Ethical approval applications related to Clinical Studies based outside of the European Union. The University of Oxford has a formal requirement that all research involving human participants should be subject to ethical review, with approval obtained from a Research Ethics Committee before commencing the study. The ...

Trials at the ready: preparing for the next pandemic

Trials at the ready: preparing for the next pandemic

Posted 04/05/2012

Researchers have previously struggled to carry out clinical trials on epidemics and the drugs used to treat them. Jeremy Farrar and others have joined forces to create a global alliance called the International Severe Acute Respiratory Infection Consortium (ISARIC), which will ensure that scientists can carry out effective clinical research during future epidemics.

Drug-resistant malaria on Burma border threatens malaria control

Drug-resistant malaria on Burma border threatens malaria control

Posted 10/04/2012

Malaria parasites on the border of Thailand and Burma are becoming resistant to our most effective malaria drugs. The concern is that this will open the way for resistance to spread to India and then Africa, where most deaths from malaria occur. Eliminating malaria might then prove impossible. The new research from a joint programme between Oxford University and Mahidol University in Thailand is reported in The Lancet. The two studies, funded by the Wellcome Trust and the National Institutes of Health, follow the first reports of drug resistance in 2009 from western Cambodia. Professor Nick White, is one of the study’s lead scientists.

The Place to Head Off Malaria

Posted 04/04/2012

Throughout history malaria has been a major killer, particularly in tropical countries. Over the past half century several highly effective anti-malarial drugs have been introduced and these have contributed to substantial reductions in mortality. The best of these was chloroquine, which was affordable, simple to take and well tolerated. But widespread use, and abuse, of chloroquine allowed malaria parasites to develop resistance and mortality rose as a consequence.

New international consortium to prepare research community for future pandemics

New international consortium to prepare research community for future pandemics

Posted 28/03/2012

An international consortium aiming to ensure that the clinical research community is better prepared for the next influenza pandemic or other rapidly emerging public health threat is launched today by leading funders of medical research from across the globe.

Atlas of Human Infectious Diseases

Atlas of Human Infectious Diseases

Posted 26/03/2012

On the 1st of March, 2012, the Atlas of Human Infectious Diseases (Wiley-Blackwell, UK) will be released. An international project that was coordinatd by the Oxford University Clinical Research Unit in Hanoi (Wellcome Trust Major Overseas Program). The Atlas is edited by Dr Heiman F.L. Wertheim (Oxford University, UK and Vietnam), Dr Peter Horby ...

'Goldilocks' gene used to find drug treatment that is 'just right' for TB patients

'Goldilocks' gene used to find drug treatment that is 'just right' for TB patients

Posted 03/02/2012

Tuberculosis patients may soon receive treatments specially tailored to their DNA, an international research team has revealed. Dr Sarah Dunstan, Head of Human Genetics at Oxford University Vietnam, said: 'It's like a "Goldilocks" gene. Depending on what versions of the LTA4H gene you have inherited, you could see an inflammatory response to tuberculosis that is "too much", "too little", or "just right".'

Fake malaria drugs could 'put millions at risk'

Fake malaria drugs could 'put millions at risk'

Posted 17/01/2012

Fake and poor quality anti-malarial drugs are threatening efforts to control the disease in Africa and could put millions of lives at risk, says lead researcher on the study, Dr Paul Newton.