Seminars

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Thu 1 Feb 2018 from 10:30 to 11:30

Strubi seminars

Democratising live-cell high-speed super-resolution microscopy

Dr Ricardo Henriques

The extension of PALM and STORM based methods to live-cell dynamics is limited due to their reliance on intense phototoxic illumination and long acquisition times. In this talk I will describe a new approach, Super-Resolution Radial Fluctuations (SRRF), capable of achieving super-resolution with... Read more

The extension of PALM and STORM based methods to live-cell dynamics is limited due to their reliance on intense phototoxic illumination and long acquisition times. In this talk I will describe a new approach, Super-Resolution Radial Fluctuations (SRRF), capable of achieving super-resolution with illumination orders of magnitude lower than methods such as SMLM or STED. It also enables live-cell imaging with conventional fluorophores using modern widefield, confocal or TIRF microscopes, achieving resolutions better than 150nm at 1 frame per second. Meanwhile, in datasets suitable for SMLM analysis SRRF achieves resolutions matching standard analysis techniques (20nm). We demonstrate, using SRRF, live-cell super-resolution images of microtubule, mitochondrial dynamics, the dynamic nanoscale reorganisation of HIV-1 host receptors, as well as extensive cortical actin remodelling during the formation of the immunological T-cell synapse.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Agata Krupa

Thu 1 Feb 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Horton Hospital / Rheumatology

Dr Nikant Sabharwal, Prof Paul Wordsworth

Horton Hospital: Dr Nikant Sabharwal -- Rheumatology: "35 years on: the changing face of metabolic bone disease", Prof Paul Wordsworth -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Horton Hospital: Dr Nikant Sabharwal -- Rheumatology: "35 years on: the changing face of metabolic bone disease", Prof Paul Wordsworth -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Audience: Public

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Thu 1 Feb 2018 from 16:30 to 17:30

Experimental Medicine TGU Seminars

John Radcliffe Hospital - Main Building, GPEC Level 3 Seminar Room 2B, Headington OX3 9DU

Title TBC

Toby Phesse

Toby Phesse, European Cancer Stem Cell Research, Institute, School of Biosciences, Cardiff University

Toby Phesse, European Cancer Stem Cell Research, Institute, School of Biosciences, Cardiff University

Audience: Public

Organisers: Prof Holm Uhlig

Fri 2 Feb 2018 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Global surgery

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 2 Feb 2018 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Cytotoxic T cells send death in an envelope’

Dr Stefan Balint

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 2 Feb 2018 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, Basement seminar room, TDI building, Headington OX3 7FZ

A Tale of Two Evils: Aging and Cancer

Dr Curtis Harris

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Christina Woodward

Fri 2 Feb 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, Large Lecture Theatre, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Predatory insects as models to understand fast and accurate sensorimotor transformations in interception tasks

Dr Paloma T. Gonzalez-Bellido

For predatory insects, detecting a fast and small moving target and catching it mid-air is crucial for survival. Such ability is shared with other species, think for example, an outfielder intercepting the ball during a baseball game. Thus, interception is a task solved by brains of very different... Read more

For predatory insects, detecting a fast and small moving target and catching it mid-air is crucial for survival. Such ability is shared with other species, think for example, an outfielder intercepting the ball during a baseball game. Thus, interception is a task solved by brains of very different complexity. Do all predatory insects share the same flight strategy and underlying neural algorithm, or have individual species found solutions tailored to their eye size, ecosystem type and phylogeny? In this talk I will present work from my laboratory aimed at answering such questions; we are studying the behaviour, sensory performance, eye morphology and neural code of premotor neurons in aerial insect predators.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sally Collins

Mon 5 Feb 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Title TBC

Prof Rose Zamoyska

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Laura Sánchez Lazo

Mon 5 Feb 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM MONDAY SEMINARS

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Tue 6 Feb 2018 from 10:30 to 11:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

St Luke's Chapel, Woodstock Road OX2 6GG

Smart glasses: Assessing a new technology for the visually impaired using qualitative methods

Dr Anne Ferrey, Iain Wilson

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Jenny Hirst

Tue 6 Feb 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Targeting splicing in myeloid neoplasms - from bench to bedside

Professor David Steensma

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Tue 6 Feb 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Richard Doll Seminar - Lung Cancer CT screening, the UKLS and European experience - time to implement?

John Field has a Personal Clinical Chair in Molecular Oncology at the University of Liverpool and is Director of Research of the Roy Castle Lung Cancer Research Programme. He is the Chief Investigator for the UK Lung Cancer Screening Trial (UKLS). He is a previous recipient of the IASLC Joseph... Read more

John Field has a Personal Clinical Chair in Molecular Oncology at the University of Liverpool and is Director of Research of the Roy Castle Lung Cancer Research Programme. He is the Chief Investigator for the UK Lung Cancer Screening Trial (UKLS). He is a previous recipient of the IASLC Joseph Cullen Award at the World Conference on Lung Cancer in recognition of lifetime scientific achievements in lung cancer prevention research. He is the principle investigator of the Liverpool Lung Project, a molecular- epidemiological study into the early detection of lung cancer, which has now recruited 13,000 participants. The UKLS Trial and the Liverpool Lung Project form part of the National Cancer Research Institute Lung Cancer portfolio. He has contributed to the lung cancer genetic susceptibility ‘Lung Oncoarray’ project and is heavily involved in the identification of molecular markers in lung and head & neck cancers. In this seminar, Professor Field will discuss UKLS, the first lung cancer screening trial to take place in the UK.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Wed 7 Feb 2018 from 11:00 to 12:30

Population Health Seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar Room 0, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Ethox Seminar: Between the reasonable and the particular: Why English law does not, and should not, give primacy to respect for patient autonomy in regulating informed consent to medical treatment

Dr Michael Dunn

The law of informed consent to medical treatment has recently been extensively overhauled in England. The 2015 Montgomery judgement has done away with the long-held position that the information to be disclosed by doctors when obtaining valid consent from patients should be determined on the basis... Read more

The law of informed consent to medical treatment has recently been extensively overhauled in England. The 2015 Montgomery judgement has done away with the long-held position that the information to be disclosed by doctors when obtaining valid consent from patients should be determined on the basis of what a reasonable body of medical opinion agree ought to be disclosed in the circumstances. The UK Supreme Court concluded that the information that is material to a patient’s decision should instead be judged by reference to a new two-limbed test founded on the notions of the ‘reasonable person’ and the ‘particular patient’. The rationale outlined in Montgomery for this new test of materiality, and academic comment on the ruling’s significance, has focused on the central ethical importance that the law now (rightfully) accords to respect for patient autonomy in the process of obtaining consent from patients. In this presentation, I dispute the claim that the new test of materiality articulated in Montgomery equates with respect for autonomy being given primacy in re-shaping the development of the law in this area. I also defend this position, arguing that my revised interpretation of Montgomery’s significance does not equate with a failure by the courts to give due legal consideration to what is owed to patients as autonomous decision-makers in the consent process. Instead, I argue that Montgomery correctly implies that doctors are ethically (and legally) obliged to attend to a number of relevant normative considerations in framing decisions about consent to treatment, which will include subtle interpretations of the values of autonomy and well-being. Doctors should give appropriate consideration to how these values are fleshed out and balanced in context in order to specify precisely what information ought to be disclosed to a patient as a requirement of obtaining consent, and as a core component of shared decision-making within medical encounters more generally. If you would like to attend, please e-mail Jane Beinart at jane.beinart@ethox.ox.ac.uk.

Booking Recommended

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Carol Mulligan-John

Wed 7 Feb 2018 from 12:00 to 13:30

Tropical Medicine Seminars

Rhodes House, Beit Room, South Parks Road OX1 3RG

High-Profile Seminar: Science for Peace

Flavia Schlegel

Dr Flavia Schlegel is UNESCO Assistant Director-General for Natural Sciences

Dr Flavia Schlegel is UNESCO Assistant Director-General for Natural Sciences

Booking Required

Audience: Members of the University only

Deadline for booking: Monday 5th Feb at 12noon

Wed 7 Feb 2018 from 13:30 to 14:30

MRC HIU Wednesday Seminar Series

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Title TBC

Dr Rahul Roychoudhuri

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Thu 8 Feb 2018 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, Basement seminar room, TDI, Headington OX3 7FZ

The Role Of The Unfolded Protein Response In Determining Lifespan

Rebecca Taylor

Activation of cellular stress responses can extend longevity in model organisms. One of these stress responses, the endoplasmic reticulum unfolded protein response (UPR), can increase lifespan when activated specifically within the nervous system of C. elegans, through an inter-tissue signaling... Read more

Activation of cellular stress responses can extend longevity in model organisms. One of these stress responses, the endoplasmic reticulum unfolded protein response (UPR), can increase lifespan when activated specifically within the nervous system of C. elegans, through an inter-tissue signaling pathway that communicates UPR activation between neurons and other tissues of the organism. In order to determine whether UPR activation can improve cellular protein folding conditions, either cell-autonomously or cell non-autonomously, we have combined tissue-specific UPR activation with tissue-specific expression of disease-associated misfolded proteins. Our findings suggest that activation of the UPR can reduce the toxicity of misfolded proteins, with differing effects depending upon the type and subcellular localization of the proteotoxic species. In addition, we have examined the metabolic changes that occur downstream of inter-tissue UPR signaling, and, surprisingly, have identified changes in lipid metabolism that may underlie some of the effects of cell non-autonomous UPR activation on both proteostasis and lifespan. These results indicate that UPR signaling affects longevity through changes in metabolism and proteostasis, and suggest that this pathway may represent a promising therapeutic

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Christina Woodward

Thu 8 Feb 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Geratology / Respiratory

Geratology: -- Respiratory: -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Geratology: -- Respiratory: -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Audience: Public

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Thu 8 Feb 2018 from 14:00 to 15:00

ARUK Oxford Drug Discovery Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, Basement Seminar Room, Headington OX3 7FZ

Title TBC

Dr David Komander

Audience: Public

Organisers: Dr John Davis

Fri 9 Feb 2018 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Prostate cancer genomic surgery: A shifting paradigm

Mr Alastair Lamb

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 9 Feb 2018 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Potential for HIV Cure/Remission in Paediatric Infection

Prof. Philip Goulder

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 9 Feb 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, Large Lecture Theatre, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Cardioprotection in the setting of acute myocardial infarction: where do we stand in 2018?

Dr Gemma Vilahur

Myocardial infarction due to coronary heart disease is the major cause of death in developed countries and a major determinant for the development of heart failure. Within the last 30 years there has been intense research into cardioprotective therapies capable of limiting cardiac damage due to... Read more

Myocardial infarction due to coronary heart disease is the major cause of death in developed countries and a major determinant for the development of heart failure. Within the last 30 years there has been intense research into cardioprotective therapies capable of limiting cardiac damage due to infarction. However, despite a better comprehension of the molecular and cellular mechanisms triggered during the ischemic insult and further revascularization, and encouraging experimental studies and proof-of-concept clinical trials, very few of the tested agents/interventions have translated to successful clinical trials and none is on standard clinical use. The failure in translation of cardioprotection to clinical practice has been attributed to many factors, from inadequate animal models to poor clinical study designs. In addition, patients usually have cardiovascular risk factors, co-morbidities and concomitant medications that cannot be overlooked since they may interact with the cardioprotective response. Besides improving the design of the experimental and clinical studies the search for new cardioprotective agents must continue. The use of emerging “omic” technologies and bioinformatics tools holds great promise to identify novel targets of therapeutic relevance and new treatment approaches able to limit the damage of myocardial infarction and attenuate the consequent adverse left ventricular remodeling process.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sally Collins

Mon 12 Feb 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Title TBC

Prof Lindy Durrant

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Laura Sánchez Lazo

Tue 13 Feb 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Student presentations

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Tue 13 Feb 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Richard Doll Seminar - Plant foods, antioxidants and the risk of cardiovascular disease, cancer, all-cause and cause-specific mortality

Professor Dagfinn Aune

Dagfinn is Associate Professor at Bjørknes University College in Oslo and Postdoctoral Researcher at Imperial College London. He has worked for several years in the Continuous Update Project of the World Cancer Research Fund, focusing on large-scale systematic reviews and meta-analyses of dietary... Read more

Dagfinn is Associate Professor at Bjørknes University College in Oslo and Postdoctoral Researcher at Imperial College London. He has worked for several years in the Continuous Update Project of the World Cancer Research Fund, focusing on large-scale systematic reviews and meta-analyses of dietary factors, obesity, physical activity and smoking and the associated risks of cardiovascular disease, cancer, type 2 diabetes, other chronic diseases and mortality. His main interests are in nutrition, lifestyle and the prevention of chronic diseases and premature mortality. In this seminar he will explore recommendations regarding intake of fruit and vegetables for the reduction of cardiovascular disease, cancer and mortality, including evidence behind eating 5 servings per day and whether specific types of fruits and vegetables may be particularly beneficial for the prevention of chronic disease. He will also discuss evidence behind intake of grain and nuts.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Tue 13 Feb 2018 from 16:00 to 17:00

OPDC Seminar Series (DPAG)

Sherrington Building, Sherrington Library, 2nd floor, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Immune and inflammatory mechanisms underlying risk for age-related neurodegenerative disease

Prof. Malú Tansey

The talk will cover the overall research interests in my lab and specifically highlight our work on HLA-DRA SNPs and LRRK2 in human peripheral blood immune cells from subjects with Parkinson’s (versus controls) and the potential role of the gut-brain axis in the pathogenesis of PD. Malú Gámez... Read more

The talk will cover the overall research interests in my lab and specifically highlight our work on HLA-DRA SNPs and LRRK2 in human peripheral blood immune cells from subjects with Parkinson’s (versus controls) and the potential role of the gut-brain axis in the pathogenesis of PD. Malú Gámez Tansey obtained her B.S/M.S in Biological Sciences from Stanford University and her Ph.D. in Physiology from The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas, Texas. Dr. Tansey spent two years in the biotech sector after post-doctoral training at Washington University in St. Louis before returning to academia and is now a tenured Professor of Physiology at Emory University in Atlanta, GA and a member of the Center for Neurodegenerative Disease. Dr. Tansey is the Senior Director of Graduate Studies (DGS) for the Emory Neuroscience Graduate Program and a member of the Executive Committee of the Emory Immunology and Molecular Pathogenesis (IMP) Graduate Program. As a Hispanic American, Dr. Tansey has served as a role model to numerous undergraduate, graduate and post-graduate trainees, many of them women from underrepresented minority groups. She serves as the new Director of Emory’s Initiative for Maximizing Student Development (IMSD) whose mission is to strengthen institutional efforts to enhance recruitment and retention of diverse student and faculty bodies at Emory, by providing research training and mentoring opportunities to both. The general research interests of Dr. Tansey’s laboratory include investigating mechanisms underlying the role of cytokine signaling and brain-immune system crosstalk in health and disease, in particular the role and regulation of central and peripheral inflammatory and immune system responses in modulating the gene-environment and gut-brain axis interactions that determine risk for development and progression of neurodegenerative diseases like Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s and related dementias, and neuropsychiatric diseases like depression.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Melanie Witt

Wed 14 Feb 2018 from 10:30 to 11:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

St Luke's Chapel, ROQ site, OX2 6GG, Woodstock Road OX2 6GG

Doing the Self: An Ethnographic Analysis of the Quantified Self

Dr Farzana Dudhwala

Abstract Self-quantifying technologies are becoming less 'maverick' and more 'mundane' by the day. Once, they were seen the preserve of a few 'avant garde eccentrics' in the Bay Area, but now Fitbits, heart rate straps and mood apps are part and parcel of daily life. But what is the effect of using... Read more

Abstract Self-quantifying technologies are becoming less 'maverick' and more 'mundane' by the day. Once, they were seen the preserve of a few 'avant garde eccentrics' in the Bay Area, but now Fitbits, heart rate straps and mood apps are part and parcel of daily life. But what is the effect of using these technologies? What is happening when technologies like these are being used to increase 'knowledge' about ourselves? Drawing upon a four year ethnography of the group known as the 'Quantified Self', I discuss how the use of technologies to track and measure the self changes the very nature of the self and its behaviours. I show how these technologies and the surrounding practices of self-quantification are not merely representing or recording the self, innocuously increasing knowledge about a pre-existing self, but are actively and continually complicit in producing the self as it is being measured and 'entracted'. Bio Farzana is currently involved in research within the Digital Health team in HERG. She is part of the INQUIRE project team, trying to understand how online patient feedback and experiences may be used to improve the quality of NHS services. Her theoretical and methodological interests are in the field of Science and Technology Studies (STS), specifically theories of agency, performativity, multiplicity, and enactment, and qualitative methodologies such as ethnography. Farzana has an undergraduate degree in Social and Political Sciences from the University of Cambridge and an MPhil in Innovation, Strategy, and Organisations from the Judge Business School, also at the University of Cambridge. She did her PhD at the University of Oxford at the Saïd Business School, and it involved a four year ethnography with the ‘Quantified Self’ to understand the ways in which self-monitoring and self-quantifying technologies are implicated in the ‘doing’ of the self.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Chrysanthi Papoutsi

Thu 15 Feb 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

ICU / Renal

ICU: -- Renal: -- Chair: Prof Hugh Watkins

ICU: -- Renal: -- Chair: Prof Hugh Watkins

Audience: Public

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Fri 16 Feb 2018 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Surgical Grand Rounds

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 16 Feb 2018 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Update from the Bowness Group

Bowness Group

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 16 Feb 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, Large Lecture Theatre, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Regulation of the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) by hormonal and local mediators

Professor Christoph Korbmacher

The epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) is a member of the ENaC/degenerin family of ion channels. ENaC is localized in the apical membrane of epithelial cells and is the rate limiting step for sodium absorption in epithelial tissues including the aldosterone-sensitive distal nephron (ASDN), the distal... Read more

The epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) is a member of the ENaC/degenerin family of ion channels. ENaC is localized in the apical membrane of epithelial cells and is the rate limiting step for sodium absorption in epithelial tissues including the aldosterone-sensitive distal nephron (ASDN), the distal colon and respiratory epithelia. Abnormal ENaC activation in the ASDN may cause renal sodium retention and arterial hypertension. This is evidenced by gain-of-function mutations of ENaC which cause Liddle syndrome (pseudohyperaldosteronism), a severe form of salt-sensitive hypertension. In the ASDN hormonal and local mediators contribute to ENaC regulation in a highly complex manner with aldosterone-dependent and -independent mechanisms. A unique feature of ENaC is its proteolytic activation which involves specific cleavage sites and the release of inhibitory peptide fragments. Under pathophysiological conditions abnormal ENaC activation by urinary proteases may contribute to sodium retention in nephrotic syndrome. The identity of physiologically relevant tubular proteases involved in proteolytic ENaC activation remains to be elucidated. In addition, renal interstitial proteases may stimulate ENaC mediated transepithelial transport through PAR2 (protease-activated receptor 2) localized in the basolateral membrane of tubular epithelial cells. This may be relevant in inflammatory renal disease. Recently, bile acids known to activate BASIC (bile acid-sensitive ion channel), another member of the ENaC/degenerin family of ion channels, have been shown to modify ENaC function. It is tempting to speculate that bile acids or other endogenous amphiphilic substances may affect ENaC function by interacting with specific channel regions.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sally Collins

Fri 16 Feb 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

NDM Seminar Series

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Seminar Rooms A & B, Headington OX3 7BN

Title TBC

Professor David Mole, Assoc. Professor Peijun Zhang

Audience: Members of the University only

Mon 19 Feb 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Title TBC

Professor Claire Lewis

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Laura Sánchez Lazo

Tue 20 Feb 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Multimodal super-resolution imaging of chromatin domain organisation

Dr. Lothar Schermelleh

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Tue 20 Feb 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Richard Doll Seminar - SGLT2 inhibition for treating diabetes – an approach which achieves far more than just lowering glucose?

Professor David Matthews

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Wed 21 Feb 2018 from 10:30 to 11:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

St Luke's Chapel, Woodstock Road OX2 6GG

Public engagement with research

Helen Adams

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Lynne Maddocks

Wed 21 Feb 2018 from 13:30 to 14:30

MRC HIU Wednesday Seminar Series

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Title TBC

Dr Sergio Quezada

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Thu 22 Feb 2018 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, Basement seminar room, TDI , Headington OX3 7FZ

Title TBC

David Hunter

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Christina Woodward

Thu 22 Feb 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

GU Medicine / Gastroenterology

Dr John Ryan, Dr Mamatha Pocock

GU Medicine: Dr Mamatha Pocock -- Gastroenterology: "Alcohol Crisis in Oxford: ACT now", Dr John Ryan -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

GU Medicine: Dr Mamatha Pocock -- Gastroenterology: "Alcohol Crisis in Oxford: ACT now", Dr John Ryan -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Audience: Public

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Fri 23 Feb 2018 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

When surgeons become patients: occupational health and wellbeing for doctors

Dr Evie Kemp

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 23 Feb 2018 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Update from the Simmons Group

Simmons Group

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 23 Feb 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, Large Lecture Theatre, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Genes to clinic in an autoimmune disease

Professor John Todd

The JDRF/Wellcome Diabetes and Inflammation Laboratory at the Wellcome Centre for Human Genetics aims to identify and characterise type 1 diabetes risk regions of the human genome and use this information to identify disease mechanisms in order to target potential preventative and therapeutic... Read more

The JDRF/Wellcome Diabetes and Inflammation Laboratory at the Wellcome Centre for Human Genetics aims to identify and characterise type 1 diabetes risk regions of the human genome and use this information to identify disease mechanisms in order to target potential preventative and therapeutic strategies. Examples include enhancing immunomodulatory functions of the interleukin-2 pathway and preventing the loss of immune tolerance to insulin.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sally Collins

Mon 26 Feb 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Title TBC

Dr Mauro Gaya

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Laura Sánchez Lazo

Tue 27 Feb 2018 from 10:30 to 11:30

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Richard Doll Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

NPEU Research Seminar - Opportunities and challenges for using real world evidence (RWE) for surveillance, quality improvement and research

Professor Simon de Lusignan, Dr Harshana Liyange

Pregnancy ontology - Royal College of General Practitioners (RCGP) Research and Surveillance Centre (RSC)

Pregnancy ontology - Royal College of General Practitioners (RCGP) Research and Surveillance Centre (RSC)

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Tue 27 Feb 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

Health Economics Seminars

Richard Doll Building, First Floor Main Meeting Room, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Title TBC

Hareth Al-Janabi

Coming Soon

Coming Soon

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: HERC

Tue 27 Feb 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Enhancers of Sonic hedgehog gene expression and making long distance relationships work

Professor Robert Hill

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Tue 27 Feb 2018 from 13:00 to 15:00

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Richard Doll Seminar - Exposome: New approaches to decoding the complexity of environmental exposure and interactions

Dr Roel Vermeulen

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Wed 28 Feb 2018 from 11:00 to 12:30

BDI seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar Room 0, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

WEH Seminar: Long game health promotion and political legitimacy in public health law

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Carol Mulligan-John