Seminars

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Tue 1 Nov 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, The Richard Doll Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Richard Doll Seminars: Kidney disease: an emerging public health problem?

Professor Paul Roderick

Audience: Public

Organisers: Natasha Bowyer

Tue 1 Nov 2016 from 14:00 to 15:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Quantitative Methods for Cell and Tissue Imaging

Jens Rittscher

Building on recent advances in computer vision and machine learning we are now in the position to monitor complex biological environments and events in the same way are analysing natural scenes. While challenges remain, algorithms for cell segmentation and tracking have matured significantly... Read more

Building on recent advances in computer vision and machine learning we are now in the position to monitor complex biological environments and events in the same way are analysing natural scenes. While challenges remain, algorithms for cell segmentation and tracking have matured significantly and can now be used in more routine high-throughput settings. Improved microscopy and imaging platforms not only allow us to image subcellular events at high spatial and temporal resolution, we can now image large tissue sections and capture how various different proteins modulate the cellular microenvironment. Enabled by advances in cell culturing technologies 3D cultures can restore specific biochemical and morphological features that are similar to their in vivo counterparts. This holds the potential for improving relevance of in vitro studies, improving our ability to predict what occurs in vivo. We are now working towards establishing the spatial and temporal context for biological events and processes. Quantitative image analysis methods are necessary for monitoring the tissue formation process and enabling longer duration time-lapse imaging. Quantitative imaging can be used very effectively to analyse the cell-to-cell and cell-to-matrix interactions that characterize the microenvironment as well as migration and invasion mechanisms. A more ambitious goal is the analysis of collective cell migration, which plays a crucial role in development and disease progression. The talk will provide examples on how quantitative imaging will advance our understanding of biological mechanisms. In addition the talk with show examples of applying similar methods to histology imaging.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Gintare Kolesnikovaite

Wed 2 Nov 2016 from 13:30 to 14:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

St Luke's Chapel, Woodstock Road OX2 6GG

Divided by Choice? Private Providers, Patient Choice and Hospital Sorting in the English National Health Service

Dr Elaine Kelly

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Catia Nicodemo

Please note updated time.

Wed 2 Nov 2016 from 13:30 to 14:30

MRC HIU Wednesday Seminar Series

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

DAMPening Autoreactivity at the First Tolerance Checkpoint

Prof Garnett Kelsoe

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Thu 3 Nov 2016 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, TDI, Basement seminar room. (Note: not the ORCRB), Headington OX3 7FZ

From genomic variation to molecular mechanism

Dr Jan Korbel

My presentation will mainly cover research from our group focused on somatic DNA alterations in the cancer genome. Chromothripsis scars the genome when localized chromosome shattering and repair occurs in a one-off catastrophe. Outcomes of this process are detectable as massive DNA rearrangements... Read more

My presentation will mainly cover research from our group focused on somatic DNA alterations in the cancer genome. Chromothripsis scars the genome when localized chromosome shattering and repair occurs in a one-off catastrophe. Outcomes of this process are detectable as massive DNA rearrangements affecting one or a few chromosomes. While recent findings suggest a crucial role of chromothripsis in cancer development, the reproducible inference of this process has remained challenging, requiring that cataclysmic one-off rearrangements can be distinguished from localized genetic lesions that occur in a step-wise fashion. We have developed a set of conceptual criteria for the inference of complex DNA rearrangements suitable for rigorous statistical analyses, based on ruling out the alternative hypothesis that DNA rearrangements have occurred in a stepwise (progressive) fashion, and have recently devised an approach for characterization of chromothripsis events in vitro. Additionally, we have begun to perform analyses of deeply sequenced cancer genomes from 2,800 cancer patients in the context of the Pan Cancer Analysis of Whole Genomes (PWAG) project, to search for commonalities and differences in molecular processes leading to cancer in different disease entities. Our recent findings from the PCAWG dataset range from the identification of novel cancer predisposition loci to somatic rearrangements activating novel proto-oncogenes through ‘enhancer hijacking’.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Mary Muers

Thu 3 Nov 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Hospital, Lecture Theatre 1

Acute General Medicine Firm B / Dermatology

Dr Andrea Pereira, Dr Maria Dudareva, Dr Charlotte Frise, Dr John Reynolds, Dr Dhruvkumar Laheru, Dr Antonia Lloyd-Lavery

Acute General Medicine Firm B: "Just another terrible headache?", Dr Andrea Pereira, Dr Maria Dudareva, Dr Charlotte Frise and Dr John Reynolds -- Dermatology: "Rash Advice", Dr Dhruvkumar Laheru and Dr Antonia Lloyd-Lavery -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Acute General Medicine Firm B: "Just another terrible headache?", Dr Andrea Pereira, Dr Maria Dudareva, Dr Charlotte Frise and Dr John Reynolds -- Dermatology: "Rash Advice", Dr Dhruvkumar Laheru and Dr Antonia Lloyd-Lavery -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Audience: Public

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Thu 3 Nov 2016 from 14:00 to 15:00

WTCHG Spotlight Series

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Rooms A&B, Headington OX3 7BN

Spotlight on Cancer Evoltion

Dr Benjamin Schuster-Böckler, Dr David Wedge

Spotlight on Cancer Evolution will be chaired by Ian Tomlinson with presentations from: Dr Benjamin Schuster-Böckler, "The role of epigenetics in mutagenesis" & Dr David Wedge, “Reconstructing the phylogeny of tumour evolution”

Spotlight on Cancer Evolution will be chaired by Ian Tomlinson with presentations from: Dr Benjamin Schuster-Böckler, "The role of epigenetics in mutagenesis" & Dr David Wedge, “Reconstructing the phylogeny of tumour evolution”

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Professor Catherine Green

Thu 3 Nov 2016 from 15:30 to 16:30

NDM Research Building Seminars

Innate immune evasion and counteraction strategies of human and simian immunodeficiency viruses

Professor Frank Kirchhoff

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Karen Poxon

Thu 3 Nov 2016 from 16:30 to 17:30

Experimental Medicine TGU Seminars

John Radcliffe Hospital - Main Building, Post Grad Centre Level 3, Headington OX3 9DU

Unravelling the steroid metabolome in the pathogenesis and treatment of NAFLD

Dr Jeremy Tomlinson

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Annabel Gordon

Fri 4 Nov 2016 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Primary trauma care worldwide: 20 years on

Dr Douglas Wilkinson

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 4 Nov 2016 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Approaches to immune target validation and prioritisation leveraging genetics

Dr Hai Fang

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 4 Nov 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, DPAG, Large Lecture Theatre, Sherrington Building, off South Parks and Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PT - 01865 272500, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Guest Spkr Professor Julie Gorelik, Professor of Cellular Biophysics, National Heart & Lung Institute,Imperial - ‘New nanoscale technique to study signalling in the cardiomyocyte’

Professor Julie Gorelik

Conventional physiological techniques for cardiac cells have attained important achievements during past decades. However, few of them resolve physiological processes at the nanoscale level in living cells. Scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) is a unique imaging technique that uses similar... Read more

Conventional physiological techniques for cardiac cells have attained important achievements during past decades. However, few of them resolve physiological processes at the nanoscale level in living cells. Scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) is a unique imaging technique that uses similar principles to the atomic force microscope, but with a pipette for the probe. The scanning technique enables simultaneous recording of high-resolution topography of cell surfaces, and cell surface fluorescence. The hybrid instrument also functions as a vastly improved patch clamp system (the "smart patch"). The method allows scanning of the surface of living cells noninvasively and enables measurement of cellular activities under more physiological conditions than is possible with other techniques. Since the activity of various receptors and ion channels is highly organized in space and time , it is essential to correlate intracellur signalling with cell structures and subcellular compartments. We describe and validate scanning ion conductance microscopy combined with conventional methods (FRET, patch-clamp, intercellular recording and optical mapping of impulse propagation ) as a new technique for cardiac cell physiology . Such hybrid technologies revealed i) functional localization of beta –adrenergic receptors; ii) location of ionic currents and membrane potential and iii) dynamics of intercellular impulse propagation in cardiac cells. In addition, we recently developed a SICM modification permitting to apply quantified positive and negative force at defined positions to the surface of cells. With this method hydrostatic pressure (0.1–150 kPa) is applied through a pipette. To prevent any surface contact, or contamination of the pipette, the distance between the pipette and cell surface is kept constant using ion conductance-based distance feedback, allowing fast and repeated measurements. Here we show that we can probe the local mechanical properties of living cells using increasing pressure, and hence measure the nanomechanical properties of the cell membrane and the underlying cytoskeleton in a variety of cells (cardiomyocytes and vascular endothelial cells) and tissue (cardiac valve and aorta) Because the cell surface can first be imaged without pressure, it is possible to relate the mechanical properties to the local cell topography. This method is well suited to probe the nanomechanical properties and mechanosensitivity of living cells.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sarah Noujaim

Fri 4 Nov 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM Science Career Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Science and KBO

Professor Hal Drakesmith

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Alice Mayer

Mon 7 Nov 2016 from 10:00 to 16:00

11-13 Banbury Road

Podcast your research

Dr Michaela Livingston-Banks, Brian Mackenwells, Stephen Eyre

From inception to publication; this practical session will take you on a tour through the basics of how to share your research in an engaging manner through podcasting. Through practical exercises the session will introduce approaches to podcasting and some of the basic technical skills of... Read more

From inception to publication; this practical session will take you on a tour through the basics of how to share your research in an engaging manner through podcasting. Through practical exercises the session will introduce approaches to podcasting and some of the basic technical skills of recording, editing and publishing audio files. By the end of the session you will have had the opportunity to create a draft pilot episode, so come prepared with ideas.

Booking Required

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Michaela Livingston-Banks

Mon 7 Nov 2016 from 11:00 to 12:00

Department of Oncology

Old Road Campus Research Building, 71A, B and C, Headington OX3 7DQ

RNA processing proteins required for DNA replication and the repair of DNA

Professor Kevin Hiom

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Eric O'Neill

Mon 7 Nov 2016 from 12:00 to 13:00

WTCHG Seminars

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, WTCHG Seminar Room A, Headington OX3 7BN

An epidemiologist's life on the edge (of the science-policy interface)

Professor Christl Donnelly

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Professor Gil McVean

Mon 7 Nov 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM MONDAY SEMINARS

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Light on the dark side of the genome - lessons from T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

Marc Mansour

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Linda Roberts

Mon 7 Nov 2016 from 14:30 to 15:30

SGC Seminars

NDM Building, TDI Basement seminar room, Headington OX3 7FZ

Biological imaging and ultrafast spectroscopy facilities in the Research Complex at Harwell, and their role in the study of structure/function relationships of EGF receptor complexes

Prof MarisaProf. Marisa Martin-Fernandez, Dr Dave Clarke

The Research Complex at Harwell is a multidisciplinary laboratory that provides facilities for researchers to undertake new and cutting edge scientific research in both life and physical sciences and the interface between them. The UK’s Central Laser Facility operates two facilities in the... Read more

The Research Complex at Harwell is a multidisciplinary laboratory that provides facilities for researchers to undertake new and cutting edge scientific research in both life and physical sciences and the interface between them. The UK’s Central Laser Facility operates two facilities in the Research Complex: ULTRA, offering multiple ultrafast pump-probe vibrational spectroscopy techniques, and Octopus, a cluster of advanced optical imaging instrumentation including sub-diffraction limit imaging, single molecule techniques, optical tweezers and FLIM/FRET microscopy. The facilities are supported by a multidisciplinary team of scientists, and are available free at the point of access to the academic community, via an open peer-review process. Dave will give an overview of the ULTRA and Octopus facilities, and Marisa will present data showing the application of some of the techniques available in Octopus to her research into the Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Family, a group of cell-surface receptor tyrosine kinases that play a fundamental role in regulation of cellular metabolism, growth and differentiation.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Natsumi Astley

Tue 8 Nov 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, The Richard Doll Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Richard Doll Seminars: Challenges and opportunities for research in the field of comorbidity

Professor Alan Silman

Audience: Public

Organisers: Natasha Bowyer

Tue 8 Nov 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

DNMT3A in normal and malignant haematopoiesis

Dr Margaret Goodell

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Tue 8 Nov 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

WTCHG Seminars

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Seminar Room A, Headington OX3 7BN

Decoding clonal dynamics in cancer, to single cell resolution

Professor Samuel Aparicio

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Professor Gil McVean

Tue 8 Nov 2016 from 14:00 to 15:00

Jenner Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

* CANCELLED * Follicular dendritic cell disruption as a novel mechanism of virus-induced immunosuppression

Prof Massimo Palmarini

Audience: Members of the University only

Please email lisbeth.soederberg@ndm.ox.ac.uk to set up a meeting with the speaker.

Tue 8 Nov 2016 from 16:40 to 17:40

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Unlocking the diagnostic potential of circulating DNA

Professor Dennis Lo

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Ruth McCaffrey

Wed 9 Nov 2016 from 17:15 to 19:00

Centre for Personalised Medicine Seminars

Mathematical Institute, L1, Woodstock Road OX2 6GG

Human Genetics and the Discovery of New Medicines

David Altshuler

Booking Required

Audience: Public

Organisers: Catherine Lidbetter

David Altshuler MD PhD, Executive Vice President for Global Research and Chief Scientific Officer, Vertex Pharmaceuticals gives the CPM Annual Lecture, 'Human Genetics and the Discovery of New Medicines'. The Centre for Personalised Medicine Annual Lecture will take place on Wednesday 9 November 2016 at 17.15 at the Mathematical Institute. The talk will be followed by drinks and nibbles. Please email cpm@well.ox.ac.uk if you have any questions.

Thu 10 Nov 2016 from 10:30 to 11:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

St Luke's Chapel, Woodstock Road OX2 6GG

How to involve PPI Contributors before you have funding

Lynne Maddocks

This seminar will give practical tips and guidance on: - ways of recruiting PPI Contributors and the help that’s available; - how to fill out PPI sections in grant application forms; and - how to ‘do’ PPI before you have a grant.

This seminar will give practical tips and guidance on: - ways of recruiting PPI Contributors and the help that’s available; - how to fill out PPI sections in grant application forms; and - how to ‘do’ PPI before you have a grant.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Jenny Hirst

Thu 10 Nov 2016 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, TDI (Basement seminar room) (Note: not the ORCRB), Headington OX3 7FZ

Understanding cellular heterogeneity

Dr Sarah Teichmann

From techniques such as microscopy and FACS analysis, we know that many cell populations harbour heterogeneity in morphology and protein expression. With the advent of high throughput single cell RNA-sequencing, we can now quantify transcriptomic cell-to-cell variation. I will discuss technical... Read more

From techniques such as microscopy and FACS analysis, we know that many cell populations harbour heterogeneity in morphology and protein expression. With the advent of high throughput single cell RNA-sequencing, we can now quantify transcriptomic cell-to-cell variation. I will discuss technical advances and biological insights into understanding cellular heterogeneity in T cells and ES cells using single cell RNA-sequencing.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Mary Muers

Thu 10 Nov 2016 from 12:45 to 13:45

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Please join us to celebrate Patrick Venables’ career in medicine & science

Speakers include: Justin Mason, Imperial College Robin Weiss, UCL Jan Potempa, University of Louisville & Jagiellonian University Chris Buckley, University of Birmingham Vivi Malmstrom, Karolinska Institute Angela Vincent, University of Oxford Paul Thompson, University of Massachusetts Medical... Read more

Speakers include: Justin Mason, Imperial College Robin Weiss, UCL Jan Potempa, University of Louisville & Jagiellonian University Chris Buckley, University of Birmingham Vivi Malmstrom, Karolinska Institute Angela Vincent, University of Oxford Paul Thompson, University of Massachusetts Medical School Anna Montgomery, University of Oxford Nick La Thangue, University of Oxford Natalia Wegner, Carpmaels and Ransford Liz Price, Great Western Hospital Chas Bountra, University of Oxford

Booking Required

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Prof Kim Midwood

With an introduction from Fiona Powrie and Marc Feldmann, and tributes from Tiny Maini, Peter Taylor and Ted Mikul. Please RSVP to Kim Midwood to attend: kim.midwood@kennedy.ox.ac.uk

Thu 10 Nov 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Hospital, Lecture Theatre 1

OCDEM / Jenner Institute

OCDEM: "Inpatient diabetes: the effect of impatience", Dr Garry Tan, Dr Rustam Rea, Dr Alistair Lumb and the Inpatient Diabetes team -- Jenner Institute: "Vaccines for therapy of high risk human papillomavirus disease", Dr Lucy Dorrell -- Chair: Prof Hugh Watkins

OCDEM: "Inpatient diabetes: the effect of impatience", Dr Garry Tan, Dr Rustam Rea, Dr Alistair Lumb and the Inpatient Diabetes team -- Jenner Institute: "Vaccines for therapy of high risk human papillomavirus disease", Dr Lucy Dorrell -- Chair: Prof Hugh Watkins

Audience: Public

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Fri 11 Nov 2016 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Ovarian Metastases From Gastrointestinal Tract Cancer

Mr Brendan Moran

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 11 Nov 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Career paths, work/life balance and equaity/diversity

Dr Rui Monteiro, Dr. Lynn Quek & Professor Catherine Porcher

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Athena Swan - Equality and Diversity Seminar

Mon 14 Nov 2016 from 11:00 to 12:00

Department of Oncology

Old Road Campus Research Building, 71A, B and C, Headington OX3 7DQ

Deciphering the role of non-canonical ubiquitination in DNA damage response and DNA replication

Professor Lorenza Penengo

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Eric O'Neill

Mon 14 Nov 2016 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Regulation of muscle fuel metabolism and mass under non-inflammatory and inflammatory conditions

Prof Paul Greenhaff

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Gintare Kolesnikovaite

Mon 14 Nov 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM MONDAY SEMINARS

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Characterising genetic causes of bone marrow failure

Tom Vulliamy

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Linda Roberts

Mon 14 Nov 2016 from 16:00 to 17:00

Newton Abraham Lectures

'Hamilton's rule and the Major Transitions in Evolution'

Professor Jacobus J. Boomsma

The organisational complexity of life has increased over evolutionary time: from prokaryotes to unicellular eukaryotes, and from there to multicellular organisms and superorganismal insect colonies. Each of these domains is characterised by previously independently reproducing units becoming... Read more

The organisational complexity of life has increased over evolutionary time: from prokaryotes to unicellular eukaryotes, and from there to multicellular organisms and superorganismal insect colonies. Each of these domains is characterised by previously independently reproducing units becoming life-time-committed to reproduce jointly: nuclear and organelle genomes in cells, gametes forming zygotes that produce somatically differentiated bodies, and monogamous parents founding social insect colonies with differentiated queen and worker castes. For more than 50 years now, the dynamics of cooperation between co-replicating units belonging to the same gene pool have been studied with resounding success using the inclusive fitness (kin selection) paradigm developed by William D. Hamilton. Hamilton’s rule captures that genes coding for cooperative traits will increase in frequency when the benefits (b) of passing on genes by helping relatives reproduce exceed the cost (c) in units of foregone personal reproduction after scaling the b/c ratio for relatedness to relatives versus own offspring (rx/ro). Extensive testing of this principle has shown that there are unifying principles for the expression of cooperation and reproductive altruism that apply across the complexity domains of life. However, what drives the irreversible passages from one complexity domain to another, also known as the Major Transitions in Evolution, has remained opaque. I will summarise the history of Inclusive Fitness and Major Transition theory and show that the origins of the Major Transitions that have shaped eukaryote complexity can all be explained by a simplified version of Hamilton’s rule, where the relatedness term cancels out because rx remains at its maximal possible level, so rx/ro invariably equals one.

Audience: Members of the University only

The lecture will be followed by drinks and canapés in the Department of Zoology. ALL WELCOME.

Tue 15 Nov 2016 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Roles of the ubiquitin system in host-pathogen interactions

Prof. Dr. Christian Behrends

During his PhD, he worked on the proteotoxicity of polyglutamine expansion proteins. He graduated summa cum laude from the Ludwig Maximilian University in Munich. In 2007, he received a Feodor Lynen Research Fellowship from the Humboldt Foundation to join the lab of J. W. Harper at the Harvard... Read more

During his PhD, he worked on the proteotoxicity of polyglutamine expansion proteins. He graduated summa cum laude from the Ludwig Maximilian University in Munich. In 2007, he received a Feodor Lynen Research Fellowship from the Humboldt Foundation to join the lab of J. W. Harper at the Harvard Medical School in Boston. During his post-doctoral studies he became interested in autophagy and performed a systematic analysis of this fundamental cellular homeostasis pathway by employing complementary proteomics, genetics and biochemical approaches. In 2010, he became an independent group leader at the Institute of Biochemistry II at the Medical Faculty of the Goethe University Frankfurt and headed an Emmy Noether Research Group of the DFG. He recently moved to the Ludwig Maximilian University in Munich where he was appointed as W2 professor. His lab is interested in various aspects of autophagy. In particular, his group aims at determining the dynamic organization of autophagy signaling complexes and their regulation by posttranslational modifications in response to different physiological conditions.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Gintare Kolesnikovaite

Tue 15 Nov 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

What is the reproducibility crisis in science and what can we do about it?

Professor Dorothy Bishop

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Tue 15 Nov 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, The Richard Doll Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Richard Doll Seminars: Data Liberation – making data available for research purposes

Professor Denise Lievesley

Audience: Public

Organisers: Natasha Bowyer

Tue 15 Nov 2016 from 14:00 to 15:00

WTCHG Spotlight Series

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Rooms A&B, Headington OX3 7BN

Spotlight on Inflammation and Peptide Therapeutics

Dr Akane Kawamura, Professor Robin Choudhury, Prof Shoumo Bhattacharya

Professor Shoumo Bhattacharya: Overview and novel therapeutic approaches from nature - 15 min + 5 for questions Professor Robin Choudhury: Inflammation biomarkers and novel targets - 15 min + 5 for questions Dr Akane Kawamura: Peptide therapeutics - 15 min + 5 for questions

Professor Shoumo Bhattacharya: Overview and novel therapeutic approaches from nature - 15 min + 5 for questions Professor Robin Choudhury: Inflammation biomarkers and novel targets - 15 min + 5 for questions Dr Akane Kawamura: Peptide therapeutics - 15 min + 5 for questions

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Professor Catherine Green

Tue 15 Nov 2016 from 16:00 to 17:00

OPDC Seminar Series (DPAG)

Sherrington Building, Sherrington Library, please note doors are locked at 4pm, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

What if we could target ageing in Parkinson’s disease?

Mickael Decressac

Mickael Decressac's lab at the Telethon Institute of Genetics and Medicine (TIGEM) aims to identify potential therapeutic targets of Parkinson's, validate them in relevant and complementary models of the condition, and finally, design clinically relevant strategies in order to bring them to the... Read more

Mickael Decressac's lab at the Telethon Institute of Genetics and Medicine (TIGEM) aims to identify potential therapeutic targets of Parkinson's, validate them in relevant and complementary models of the condition, and finally, design clinically relevant strategies in order to bring them to the bedside. In 2012, he developed a viral vector-based model of Parkinson’s, which is widely used for studying the pathological mechanisms and testing protective therapies. Notably, he used this model to uncover novel mechanisms underlying the response of affected neurons to neurotrophic factors and contributed to understanding how the cellular clearance pathways are involved in the disease process. His current research is focused on understanding and modeling Parkinson’s as well as developing new therapeutic approaches using translational approaches.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Melanie Witt

Wed 16 Nov 2016 from 10:30 to 11:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

St Luke's Chapel, Woodstock Road OX2 6GG

The ‘One in a Million’ study: Creating a database of UK primary care consultations.

Dr Rebecca Barnes

Background: Around one million primary care consultations happen in England every day. Despite this, much of what happens in these visits remains a “black box”. Aim: To establish the feasibility of creating an archive of video-recorded consultations based on a representative sample of routine... Read more

Background: Around one million primary care consultations happen in England every day. Despite this, much of what happens in these visits remains a “black box”. Aim: To establish the feasibility of creating an archive of video-recorded consultations based on a representative sample of routine face-to-face doctor-patient consultations and collecting linked data, gaining consent for use in research and training. Design and setting: Cross-sectional study in 12 General Practices (West of England) Method: Up to two general practitioners (GPs) from each practice were invited to video-record up to 20 consecutive patients over one to two days. Eligible patients were 18+ years, consulting on their own behalf, English-speaking and with capacity to consent. GP questionnaires were self-administered during the data collection period. Patient questionnaires were self-administered immediately pre- and post-consultation and GPs filled out a checklist after each recording. A follow-up questionnaire was sent to patients 10 days after the index recorded consultation, and data were extracted from medical records data after three months. Results: Between July 2014-April 2015, 421 (86%) of 491 patients approached were found to be eligible. 334 (79%) eligible patients consented to participate and 327 consultations with 23 GPs were successfully recorded (307 video, 20 audio only). The majority of patients (n=300, 89%) consented to use by other researchers, subject to specific ethical approval. Conclusion: Most patients were willing to allow their consultations to be video-recorded, and with very few exceptions, to allow recordings and linked data to be stored in a data repository for future use for research and training.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Karen Morecroft

Wed 16 Nov 2016 from 12:00 to 13:00

Experimental Medicine TGU Seminars

John Radcliffe Hospital - Main Building, Post Grad Centre Level 3, Headington OX3 9DU

Human Focus Group: Leedham Group

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Carolina Arancibia

Wed 16 Nov 2016 from 14:30 to 15:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

St Luke's Chapel, Woodstock Road OX2 6GG

How much is enough: what should we be spending on the NHS?

Anita Charlesworth, Director of Research and Economics

Before joining the Health Foundation in May 2014, Anita Charlesworth was Chief Economist at the Nuffield Trust for four years where she led the Trust’s work on health care financing and market mechanisms. She was Chief Analyst and Chief Scientific Advisor at the Department of Culture, Media and... Read more

Before joining the Health Foundation in May 2014, Anita Charlesworth was Chief Economist at the Nuffield Trust for four years where she led the Trust’s work on health care financing and market mechanisms. She was Chief Analyst and Chief Scientific Advisor at the Department of Culture, Media and Sport from 2007 to 2010 and, prior to this, she was Director of Public Spending at the Treasury from 1998-2007, where she led the team working with Sir Derek Wanless on his reform of NHS funding in 2002.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Catia Nicodemo

Thu 17 Nov 2016 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, Basement seminar room, NDM Building, Old Road Campus (please note, not ORCRB), Headington OX3 7FZ

Probing Cancer Epigenomes for New Therapeutic Strategies

Dr Cheryl Arrowsmith

Regulation of gene expression via chromatin associated factors and alterations of the cellular epigenome are fundamental to most biological processes, and many disease mechanisms. We are taking a protein family approach to understand how chromatin regulatory proteins recognize specific histone tail... Read more

Regulation of gene expression via chromatin associated factors and alterations of the cellular epigenome are fundamental to most biological processes, and many disease mechanisms. We are taking a protein family approach to understand how chromatin regulatory proteins recognize specific histone tail sequences and their posttranslational modifications. Proteins such as histone methyltransferases, demethylases, acetyltransferase, bromodomains and chromodomains mediate nuclear signaling networks that regulate epigenetic cellular states and gene expression programs. Systematic structural and biochemical analyses of these protein families are revealing key features of selectivity and regulation among these factors, enabling structure-based development of potent, selective, cell-active small molecule inhibitors of individual epigenetic regulatory proteins. Such compounds – Chemical Probes - are valuable tools for understanding epigenetic signaling mechanisms in cells and can link pharmacological tar are highly complementary to genetic methods and more closely mimic strategies for therapeutic translation. I will present our recent work on Chemical Probes for protein methyltransferases and their characterization in human cancer models. These studies include the targeting of “undruggable” oncogenic transcription factors via modulation of the methyltransferases on which they depend, and targeting the stem-like tumour initiating cell populations in colorectal cancer and glioblastoma.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Christina Woodward

Thu 17 Nov 2016 from 12:00 to 13:00

CNCB Seminar Series

From Single Cells and Columns to Cortical Networks: Coincidence Detection and Synaptic Transmission

Professor Bert Sakmann

While patch pipettes were initially designed to record elementary current events, the whole-cell and cell-attached recording configurations proved useful tools also for examining signaling within and between neurons. I will first summarize work on electrical signaling within single neurons,... Read more

While patch pipettes were initially designed to record elementary current events, the whole-cell and cell-attached recording configurations proved useful tools also for examining signaling within and between neurons. I will first summarize work on electrical signaling within single neurons, describing communication between their dendritic compartments, soma, and nerve terminals via forward and backward propagating action potentials. Dendritic excitability endows neurons with a capacity for coincidence detection of spatially separated subthreshold inputs, which is broadcast to other cells by the initiation of action potential bursts (AP bursts). AP bursts can trigger target cell-specific release mechanisms at different terminals of the same neuron and result in the induction of synaptic plasticity if pre- and postsynaptic AP bursts coincide. But what are the roles of active dendritic excitability in behaving animals? To answer this question, I will highlight the functional architecture of an averaged cortical column in the vibrissal (whisker) field of somatosensory cortex (vS1) and compare synaptic and unit responses of major cortical output neurons in layer 5 with responses of afferent neurons in primary somatosensory thalamus and one efferent target. The occurrence of AP bursts suggests that coincidence detection mechanisms operate in vivo; three-dimensional reconstructions indicate that combinations of thalamocortical and intra-columnar inputs could activate dendritic coincidence detection mechanisms. Recordings from efferent targets reveal the importance of AP bursts for signal transfer to these cells. vS1 cortex thus appears to transform the afferent sensory code, at least partially, from a rate to an interval (burst) code.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Fiona Woods

Thu 17 Nov 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Hospital, Lecture Theatre 1

Tropical Medicine Day

Dr Mehreen Datoo, Dr Sarah Rowland-Jones, Dr Nick Wong

Tropical Medicine: "Retro tropical", Dr Mehreen Datoo and Dr Sarah Rowland-Jones -- Tropical Medicine: "Double Trouble", Dr Nick Wong -- Chair: Prof Hugh Watkins

Tropical Medicine: "Retro tropical", Dr Mehreen Datoo and Dr Sarah Rowland-Jones -- Tropical Medicine: "Double Trouble", Dr Nick Wong -- Chair: Prof Hugh Watkins

Audience: Public

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Thu 17 Nov 2016 from 17:00 to 19:00

African Studies Seminar Series

St Antony's College, Pavilion Room, 62 Woodstock Road OX2 6JF

‘Cholera and the Politics of Disposability in Harare's High-Density Townships’

Simukai Chigudu

Please refer to our website for further information www.africanstudies.ox.ac.uk/events In August 2008, the impoverished high-density townships in Harare’s metropolitan area were engulfed by a devastating cholera epidemic. The disease rapidly spread throughout Zimbabwe resulting in an... Read more

Please refer to our website for further information www.africanstudies.ox.ac.uk/events In August 2008, the impoverished high-density townships in Harare’s metropolitan area were engulfed by a devastating cholera epidemic. The disease rapidly spread throughout Zimbabwe resulting in an unprecedented 98,000 cases and over 4,000 deaths, thereby becoming the largest and most extensive cholera outbreak in recorded African history. In the aftermath of the epidemic, questions of suffering, rescue, relief, and rehabilitation have persisted beyond the fixed scientific and statistical realities of disease epidemiology, body counts, and reconstruction costs. Rather, they have continued to exist in on-going processes of meaning-making through which people grasp and come to terms with the epidemic as a socio-political event. In Zimbabwe’s divided and contentious political environment, this involves polarised claims about what really happened and about who the heroes and villains of the outbreak were. In this presentation, I focus on the views of residents in the townships where the epidemic first fulminated. I ask how residents of Harare’s high-density townships understood and experienced the cholera outbreak in terms of Zimbabwe’s larger social, economic, and political dynamics. By examining the narratives of township residents, I suggest that the retelling of experiences of the outbreak is significant not only for bringing hitherto undocumented narratives to light, but also for what such retelling says of those narrators themselves and for the way that the social construction of the cholera disaster occurs and is committed to historical memory.

Audience: Public

Fri 18 Nov 2016 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Addressing overtreatment of breast cancer

Professor Adele Francis

Professor Adele Francis is a Consultant Surgeon at University Hospital Birmingham and Honorary Professor in Cancer Sciences at University of Birmingham. She is the Royal College of Surgeons Specialty Lead for Breast Surgery Research and Chief Investigator of NEO-EXCEL and LORIS and NOSTRA... Read more

Professor Adele Francis is a Consultant Surgeon at University Hospital Birmingham and Honorary Professor in Cancer Sciences at University of Birmingham. She is the Royal College of Surgeons Specialty Lead for Breast Surgery Research and Chief Investigator of NEO-EXCEL and LORIS and NOSTRA Trials. Professor Francis is a member of the NCRI Breast Clinical Studies Group (CSG), the ABS Research committee and the breast CSG translational subgroup. Her research interests include neoadjuvant therapy and addressing overtreatment in surgery by increasing the current evidence base.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 18 Nov 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, DPAG, Large Lecture Theatre, Sherrington Building, off South Parks and Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PT - 01865 272500, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Int' Guest Spkr Prof Michaela Kuhn MD, Head of the Institute of Physiology, University of Würzburg : ‘Cell-specific actions of natriuretic peptides: lessons from genetic mouse models’

Cyclic GMP controls many cellular functions ranging from growth, viability and differentiation, to contractility, secretion and ion transport. The mammalian genome encodes seven transmembrane guanylyl cyclases (GCs), GC-A to GC-G, which mainly modulate submembrane cGMP microdomains. These GCs share... Read more

Cyclic GMP controls many cellular functions ranging from growth, viability and differentiation, to contractility, secretion and ion transport. The mammalian genome encodes seven transmembrane guanylyl cyclases (GCs), GC-A to GC-G, which mainly modulate submembrane cGMP microdomains. These GCs share a unique topology comprising an extracellular domain, a short transmembrane region, and an intracellular C-terminal catalytic (cGMP synthezising) region. GC-A mediates the endocrine effects of atrial and B-type natriuretic peptides regulating arterial blood pressure/volume and energy balance. GC-B is activated by C-type natriuretic peptide, stimulating endochondral ossification in autocrine way. GC-C mediates the paracrine effects of guanylins on intestinal ion transport and epithelial turnover. GC-E and GC-F are expressed in photoreceptor cells of the retina and their activation by intracellular Ca2+-regulated proteins is essential for vision. Finally in the rodent system two olfactorial GCs, GC-D and GC-G, are activated by low concentrations of CO2 and by peptidergic (guanylins) and non-peptidergic odorants as well as by coolness, which has implications for social behaviors. In the past years advances in human and mouse genetics as well as the development of sensitive biosensors monitoring the spatiotemporal dynamics of cGMP in living cells have provided novel relevant informations about this receptor family. This increased our understanding of the mechanisms of signal transduction, regulation and (dys)function of the membrane GCs, clarified their relevance for genetic and acquired diseases and, importantly, has revealed novel targets for therapies. The seminar by Michaela Kuhn will illustrate these different features of membrane GCs, with a special focus on GC-A and GC-B, the receptors for natriuretic peptides.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sarah Noujaim

Mon 21 Nov 2016 from 12:30 to 13:30

SGC Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Informatics methods for understanding drug action

Prof Russ Altman

About Prof Altman’s lab: Our lab has created a computational representation of protein microenvironments that captures their key biochemical and biophysical features. We have used this representation to build several capabilities that are useful for understanding drug action. These capabilities... Read more

About Prof Altman’s lab: Our lab has created a computational representation of protein microenvironments that captures their key biochemical and biophysical features. We have used this representation to build several capabilities that are useful for understanding drug action. These capabilities include (1) recognizing the similarities between protein pockets, (2) predicting the likelihood that a pocket specifically will bind a small molecule drug, (3) predicting small molecule fragments that may bind parts of a protein pocket, (4) predicting the side effects of a drug that binds a pocket based on its anticipated pattern of off-target binding, and (5) predicting the dose range for a drug that binds a pocket based on the expected tradeoff between promiscuity and selectivity. We are interested in using these tools for drug target identification and repurposing. If time allows, I will also discuss our work extracting gene-drug-disease associations from text using natural language processing techniques.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Natsumi Astley

Mon 21 Nov 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM MONDAY SEMINARS

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Control of B cell immunity and leukaemia by the transcription factor Pax5

Meinrad Busslinger

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Linda Roberts

Tue 22 Nov 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Use of single cell transcriptomics to study blood stem cells formation

Dr Christophe Lancrin

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Tue 22 Nov 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, The Richard Doll Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Richard Doll Seminars: The Mediterranean diet in cardiovascular prevention: PREDIMED and PREDIMED-PLUS trials

Professor Miguel Angel Martinez-Gonzalez

Audience: Public

Organisers: Natasha Bowyer

Wed 23 Nov 2016 from 15:00 to 16:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Oral Pathobiont Regulation of n-3 Docosapentaenoic Acid-derived SPM in Inflammatory Arthritis

Dr Magdalena B. Flak

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Gintare Kolesnikovaite

Thu 24 Nov 2016 from 10:30 to 11:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

St Luke's Chapel, Woodstock Road OX2 6GG

Running meetings that include PPI Contributors

Lynne Maddocks

This seminar will give practical tips and guidance on: - how to support PPI contributors so they can give the input you need for your research; and - how to run meetings (e.g. focus groups or steering committees) involving PPI Contributors in a way which enables them to contribute.

This seminar will give practical tips and guidance on: - how to support PPI contributors so they can give the input you need for your research; and - how to run meetings (e.g. focus groups or steering committees) involving PPI Contributors in a way which enables them to contribute.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Jenny Hirst

Thu 24 Nov 2016 from 11:00 to 17:30

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Immunology Career Day

This year's Immunology Career Day is an opportunity to meet fellow immunologists working throughout Oxford and find out about career options post-PhD. This time we have a very special set of guest speakers talking about their experience in: Academia versus Industry Public Engagment Setting up a Biotech Science Writing The event is FREE and OPEN to all!

This year's Immunology Career Day is an opportunity to meet fellow immunologists working throughout Oxford and find out about career options post-PhD. This time we have a very special set of guest speakers talking about their experience in: Academia versus Industry Public Engagment Setting up a Biotech Science Writing The event is FREE and OPEN to all!

Booking Required

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Oxford Immunology Group

Thu 24 Nov 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Hospital, Lecture Theatre 1

Acute General Medicine Firm C / Radiology

Dr Jamie Franklin, Dr Abigail Ash

Acute General Medicine Firm C: "It's all in your head!", Dr Abigail Ash -- Radiology: "Oligometastases - in the spirit of Alexandre Dumas", Dr Jamie Franklin -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Acute General Medicine Firm C: "It's all in your head!", Dr Abigail Ash -- Radiology: "Oligometastases - in the spirit of Alexandre Dumas", Dr Jamie Franklin -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Audience: Public

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Fri 25 Nov 2016 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Anatomy for modern liver surgery and medical education

Professor Jean Fasel

Jean H.D. Fasel, born in Basel (Switzerland) in 1953, enjoyed a classical grammar school education (including Greek and Latin) before going on to study medicine. After spending his postgraduate training focusing mainly on the field of internal medicine, he specialised in clinical anatomy. He chose... Read more

Jean H.D. Fasel, born in Basel (Switzerland) in 1953, enjoyed a classical grammar school education (including Greek and Latin) before going on to study medicine. After spending his postgraduate training focusing mainly on the field of internal medicine, he specialised in clinical anatomy. He chose this discipline because it allowed him to combine his thirst for science and philosophy with his teaching abilities, while remaining close to patient care. He carried out most of his specialisation in Switzerland, rounding it off with a number of assignments abroad, notably in Vienna, Heidelberg, the Mayo Clinic (Rochester, MN, USA), and Kyoto (Japan). After his doctorate (MD) he became a private lecturer and associate professor, and was finally appointed as Chair of Clinical Anatomy at the Medical Faculty of the University of Geneva (Switzerland) in 2008, where he has worked ever since. The research conducted by Professor Fasel and his team is primarily concerned with the diagnosis and invasive treatment of lesions of the human brain, skull and liver. In the field of the brain and skull his particular interest lies with the blood vessels and aneurysmatic diseases affecting them. By combining traditional anatomical methods with advanced imaging and computer technologies, he has contributed to the development of now established endovascular therapies in interventional neuroradiology. His investigations into the liver have led to an innovative understanding of liver architecture. This academic achievement has been reflected in surgical practice in the form of refined, tissue-friendly operating techniques.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 25 Nov 2016 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

The Secret Life of HLA-E

Dr Simon Brackenridge, Lucy Walters, Professor Sir Andrew McMichael

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 25 Nov 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, DPAG, Large Lecture Theatre, Sherrington Building, off South Parks and Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PT - 01865 272500, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Guest Spkr Professor Thomas Voit, NIHR GOSH UCL Biomedical Research Centre, Great Ormond Street Hospital : 'Developing a gene therapy approach for Duchenne muscular dystrophy'

Professor Thomas Voit

Gene therapy (GT) for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is facing a number of important challenges: (i) the size of the organ skeletal muscle which makes up ~40% of the total body mass, requires large scale industrial GMP production, a challenge about to be mastered for Adeno-associated virus (AAV)... Read more

Gene therapy (GT) for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is facing a number of important challenges: (i) the size of the organ skeletal muscle which makes up ~40% of the total body mass, requires large scale industrial GMP production, a challenge about to be mastered for Adeno-associated virus (AAV) as a GT shuttle; (ii) the strongly degenerative nature of the disease which poses a series of problems such as biodistribution of a transgene into fibrotic tissue, unfavourable oxidative cell environment, and progressive transgene loss; (iii) multi-organ involvement including heart and brain with different dystrophin isoforms conferring distinct functions; and (iv) the general problem of immune reaction both to the GT shuttle such as the AAV capsid and potentially against the transgene. Finally, the economic model for an expensive ‘one act’ therapy with uncertain clinical effect in the long term is not established today, and this uncertainty has dampened enthusiasm to invest heavily into this therapeutic domain in the past. Several research groups have attempted to surmount these problems, and positive results for loco-regional application or systemic application of either an exon-skipping AAV8-U7-antisense GT or a minigene-based AAV-microdystrophin therapy have been reported in the mdx mouse and in the dystrophin-deficient Golden Retriever Muscular Dystrophy (GRMD) dog model. In addition, in vitro and in vivo experiments have shown possible ways forward to counteract unfavourable tissue environment or progressive transgene loss after delivery. The next years will see the first AAV-based gene therapy trials likely using a microdystrophin approach come to the bedside. Lessons learned from the animal experiments as well as extrapolations of these GT approaches to the human will be discussed.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sarah Noujaim

Fri 25 Nov 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM Science Career Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Planning your career: what helps?

Dr Bill Dunn, Dr Rachel Bray

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Alice Mayer

Mon 28 Nov 2016 from 09:00 to 17:00

Centre for Personalised Medicine Seminars

St Anne's College, Woodstock Road OX2 6HS

Personalised Medicine in Practice Seminar Series: Cancer

Professor Ian Tomlinson, Professor Rebecca Fitzgerald, Dr Tjalling Bosse, Dr Marco Gerlinger, Professor Tim Maughan, Dr Louis Vermeulen, Dr Sergio Quezada, Dr James Brenton

The Centre for Personalised Medicine is delighted to invite you to the Personalised Medicine in Practice Seminar Series: Cancer. The integration of molecular and sequencing technology in research has given significant insight into cancer biology and treatment. This one-day seminar featuring leading... Read more

The Centre for Personalised Medicine is delighted to invite you to the Personalised Medicine in Practice Seminar Series: Cancer. The integration of molecular and sequencing technology in research has given significant insight into cancer biology and treatment. This one-day seminar featuring leading UK and international researchers will explore the scientific advances, and highlight the issues surrounding the personalisation of cancer diagnosis, patient stratification and therapy. Sessions include: Predisposition and Screening, Risk Stratification, Molecular Heterogeneity and Cancer Therapy. The event is free to attend, but booking is required, and you can do so here: https://goo.gl/forms/dpqorjzMbYT1A94q1. Please note that these timings are preliminary, and will be finalised closer to the time. For any queries, please email: cpm@well.ox.ac.uk

Booking Required

Audience: All interested people are invited to attend.

Organisers: Catherine Lidbetter

Mon 28 Nov 2016 from 11:00 to 12:00

Department of Oncology

Old Road Campus Research Building, 71A, B and C, Headington OX3 7DQ

Early diagnosis of Pancreatic cancer using a simple blood sample

Professor Carl Borrebaeck

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Eric O'Neill

Mon 28 Nov 2016 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Innate lymphoid cells orchestrate organ homeostasis

Prof Andreas Diefenbach

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Gintare Kolesnikovaite

Tue 29 Nov 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, The Richard Doll Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Richard Doll Seminars: Dionysis, Dinosaurs and the Politics of Alcohol

Professor Nick Sheron

Audience: Public

Organisers: Natasha Bowyer

Tue 29 Nov 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Stem cell dynamics in homeostasis and cancer

Dr Edward Morrissey

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Tue 29 Nov 2016 from 14:00 to 15:00

WTCHG Spotlight Series

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Rooms A&B, Headington OX3 7BN

Spotlight on Diabetes

TBC

TBC

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Professor Catherine Green