Seminars

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Mon 3 Apr 2017 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Kynurenines and serine proteases: from brain to periphery and back

Professor Trevor W. STONE

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Gintare Kolesnikovaite

Mon 3 Apr 2017 from 12:00 to 13:00

CNCB Seminar Series

A Circuit Architecture for Angular Integration

Gaby Maimon

Mammalian brains store and update quantitative internal variables. Primates and rodents, for example, have an internal sense of whether they are 1 or 10 meters away from a landmark and whether a ripe fruit is twice or four times as appetizing as a less ripe counterpart. Such quantitative internal... Read more

Mammalian brains store and update quantitative internal variables. Primates and rodents, for example, have an internal sense of whether they are 1 or 10 meters away from a landmark and whether a ripe fruit is twice or four times as appetizing as a less ripe counterpart. Such quantitative internal signals are the basis of cognitive function; however, our understanding of how the brain stores and updates these variables remains fragmentary. I will discuss imaging and perturbation experiments in tethered, walking Drosophila whose goal is to determine how internal variables are calculated and how they influence behavior. Specifically, in the central complex a set of heading neurons have been described, whose activity tracks the fly’s orientation, similar to head direction cells in rodents. The circuit architecture that gives rise to these orientation tracking properties remains unknown. I will describe a set of clockwise- and counterclockwise-shifting neurons whose wiring and calcium dynamics provide a means to rotate the heading system’s angular estimate over time. Shifting neurons are required for properly tracking the fly's movements in the dark, and their stimulation induces a rotation of the heading signal in the expected direction and by the expected amount. The central features of this circuit are analogous to models proposed for head direction cells in rodents and may thus inform how neural systems, in general, perform integration.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Fiona Woods

Mon 3 Apr 2017 from 12:00 to 13:00

WTCHG Seminars

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Seminar room B , Headington OX3 7BN

Reaching the target for neglected tropical diseases

Dr Deirdre Hollingsworth

Several neglected tropical diseases are targeted for ‘elimination as a public health problem’ by 2020, reducing the burden amongst the poorest populations in the world, the ‘bottom billion’. As 2020 approaches there is a drive to use new tools and adapt existing strategies to achieve the... Read more

Several neglected tropical diseases are targeted for ‘elimination as a public health problem’ by 2020, reducing the burden amongst the poorest populations in the world, the ‘bottom billion’. As 2020 approaches there is a drive to use new tools and adapt existing strategies to achieve the goals in as many countries as possible. Alongside these efforts there also needs to be an assessment of whether true elimination is feasible and, if not, what strategies could be used to ‘hold the line’. Using the example of lymphatic filariasis, a mosquito-borne helminth which can cause debilitating symptoms such as elephantiasis, we will discuss the use of multiple models and, more recently, geo-spatial data, to inform control strategies at the international policy level through to endemic country level.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Susan Wilson

Tue 4 Apr 2017 from 10:00 to 11:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

ZEISS Lightsheet Z.1 imaging for cleared biological samples – to reveal the details deeper and clearer

Dr Katherine Lau

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Gintare Kolesnikovaite

Tue 4 Apr 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Evolution of tissue-specific enhancers across mammals

Dr Duncan Odom

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Wed 5 Apr 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

WTCHG Seminars

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Roosevelt Drive Oxford, OX3 7BN, Seminar room A & B, Headington OX3 7BN

Lexogen seminar highlighting the benefits of QuantSeq 3' mRNA-Seq library prepartion for Next Generation Sequencing

Professor Jernej Ule, Associate Professor André Furger

Lexogen in association with the Oxford Genomics Centre invites you to a lunchtime seminar highlighting the benefits of QuantSeq 3' mRNA-Seq library preparation for Next Generation Sequencing. Speakers: Professor Jernej Ule ‘High-resolution RNA maps demonstrate common principles of splicing and... Read more

Lexogen in association with the Oxford Genomics Centre invites you to a lunchtime seminar highlighting the benefits of QuantSeq 3' mRNA-Seq library preparation for Next Generation Sequencing. Speakers: Professor Jernej Ule ‘High-resolution RNA maps demonstrate common principles of splicing and polyadenylation regulation by TDP-43’. Associate Professor André Furger ‘The role of alternative cleavage and polyadenylation in gene regulation’.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Susan Wilson

Thu 6 Apr 2017 from 10:30 to 11:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

Gibson Building, Room 3, Woodstock Road OX2 6HE

Evaluating Organizational Change in Health Care: The Patient-Centered Hospital Model

Dr Stefano Verzillo

We develop an ex post evaluation of the performance of hospitals moving from a functional to a patient-centered (PC) organizational model. We suggest a quantitative framework for overcoming some of the challenges in the evaluation of organizational models by taking advantage of the fortunate... Read more

We develop an ex post evaluation of the performance of hospitals moving from a functional to a patient-centered (PC) organizational model. We suggest a quantitative framework for overcoming some of the challenges in the evaluation of organizational models by taking advantage of the fortunate coincidence of a quasi-experimental setting regarding all the major diagnostic categories (MDCs) in three hospitals of an important region of Italy and of the availability of a unique administrative data set spanning nine years. The results show that both efficiency and effectiveness have significantly increased in the average MDC of PC hospitals. These results have important policy implications, which may also be of great interest to policy makers and hospital managers. Please send an email to catia.nicodemo@economics.ox.ac.uk if you would like to talk with the speaker

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Catia Nicodemo

Fri 7 Apr 2017 from 14:30 to 15:30

MRC HIU Wednesday Seminar Series

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

A role for immune cells in sterile injury

Paul Kubes

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Mon 10 Apr 2017 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Role of neutrophils in health and disease

Paul Kubes

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Gintare Kolesnikovaite

Wed 12 Apr 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

SGC Seminars

NDM Building, TDI Basement seminar room, Headington OX3 7FZ

Biophysical characterization of G6b-B: advancing the field of ITIM receptors

Prof Yotis Senis

Bio: Prof. Senis will present data pertaining to the type I TM IgSF ITIM receptor, G6b-B. This receptor contributes to fine tuning platelet responses to vascular injury, and also performs a vital and non-redundant role in platelet turnover. Prof. Senis would be really interested in working with the... Read more

Bio: Prof. Senis will present data pertaining to the type I TM IgSF ITIM receptor, G6b-B. This receptor contributes to fine tuning platelet responses to vascular injury, and also performs a vital and non-redundant role in platelet turnover. Prof. Senis would be really interested in working with the SGC and would like to meet with anyone that can help in the crystallography of G6b-B, which has so far been a little… challenging, as well as anyone that might be able to help with identifying small molecules that inhibit or modulate G6b-B activity to help clarify the role of this ITIM receptor in platelet function.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Natsumi Astley

Tue 18 Apr 2017 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Cytosolic RNA sensing in T-dependent immunity

Prof Cecile King

Associate Professor Cecile King is an immunologist/cell biologist investigating the regulation of immune responses in health and disease. A broad objective of this work is to analyse pathways that can be modulated to improve immunity in individuals during vaccination, and limit immune responses... Read more

Associate Professor Cecile King is an immunologist/cell biologist investigating the regulation of immune responses in health and disease. A broad objective of this work is to analyse pathways that can be modulated to improve immunity in individuals during vaccination, and limit immune responses that cause damage to both endogenous tissues and transplanted tissues in autoimmune diseases. A/Professor King received her PhD from the Telethon Institute for Child Health, University of Western Australia and completed her postdoctoral training at the Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, USA. She joined the faculty of the Department of Immunology at the Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Sydney, Australia in 2005 and is an Associate Professor at the Department of Medicine, University of New South Wales. Dr King continues to be intrigued by how the immune system maintains tolerance to self. Her research is focused on how interactions between the environment and immune system influence chronic inflammation and autoimmune disease. Dr King has made important contributions to our understanding of how cytokines influence adaptive immune responses, including T follicular helper cell differentiation during the germinal center reaction and the identification of IL-21 as a therapeutic target for autoimmune diabetes. Dr King’s interests include integrating the world of RNA sensing and genes within type 1 IFN regulatory pathways with autoimmune disease and adaptive immune responses.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Gintare Kolesnikovaite

Wed 19 Apr 2017 from 13:30 to 14:30

MRC HIU Wednesday Seminar Series

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

New cancer immunotherapy strategies: the host is the target

Dr Tobias Janowitz

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Thu 20 Apr 2017 from 10:30 to 11:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

Gibson Building, Room 1, Woodstock Road OX2 6HE

* CANCELLED * Title TBC

Dr Annette Hauskov Graungaard

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Susan Kirkpatrick

CANCELLED

Thu 20 Apr 2017 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, TDI, Basement Seminar Room, Headington OX3 7FZ

DNA methylation in mammals: a DNA methyltransferase can hide another

Dr. Déborah Bourc'his

Déborah Bourc'his’ team is focused on understanding the nature and the role of the epigenetic information in gametogenesis, fertilization and early embryonic development. Her work is mostly centered on DNA methylation, how it influences gametic production and integrity, and impacts on phenotypes... Read more

Déborah Bourc'his’ team is focused on understanding the nature and the role of the epigenetic information in gametogenesis, fertilization and early embryonic development. Her work is mostly centered on DNA methylation, how it influences gametic production and integrity, and impacts on phenotypes at following generations. Studying the epigenetic setting of germ cells allows investigation of several crucial aspects of mammalian biology such as transposon control, genomic imprinting and early lineage commitment. Studying DNA methylation in the window of conception leads also to mechanistic insights into the spatio-temporal control of genomic methylation specificity, including components of histone modification and RNA-directed pathways. Her work uses fine developmental and molecular dissection, combined with genetic tools (CRISPR) and genome-wide sequencing approaches.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Mary Muers

Thu 20 Apr 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Hospital, Lecture Theatre 1

Infectious Diseases / Acute General Medicine Firm D

Dr David Lewis, Dr Zehanah Izmeth, Mr Alex Green, Prof Nick White

Infectious Diseases: "Malaria elimination", Prof Nick White -- Acute General Medicine Firm D: "Loin pain haematuria syndrome: an individualised approach", Dr David Lewis, Dr Zehanah Izmeth and Mr Alex Green -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Infectious Diseases: "Malaria elimination", Prof Nick White -- Acute General Medicine Firm D: "Loin pain haematuria syndrome: an individualised approach", Dr David Lewis, Dr Zehanah Izmeth and Mr Alex Green -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Audience: Public

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Mon 24 Apr 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM MONDAY SEMINARS

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

The A to Zika of Guillain-Barre syndrome

Hugh Willison

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Linda Roberts

Tue 25 Apr 2017 from 10:00 to 11:00

DPAG Postdoctoral Society Events

Sherrington Building, Small Lecture Theatre, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Postdoctoral Society - Head of Department Talk

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Mattea Finelli

Tue 25 Apr 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

MHU Student Presentations

Tomasz Dobrzycki; Akiko Hashimoto; Dominic Owens

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Tue 25 Apr 2017 from 13:00 to 15:00

Thom Building, Lecture Hall 2, Parks Road OX1 3PJ

Challenges in MedTech Innovation - A product designer’s viewpoint on developing medical innovations

Patrick Hall

Oxford University’s product design ‘Expert in Residence’ Patrick Hall is a consultant with long experience of developing clever innovations into commercial products. In this talk he will talk about some of the challenges, including managing technical risk, usability and some of the pitfalls of project management.

Oxford University’s product design ‘Expert in Residence’ Patrick Hall is a consultant with long experience of developing clever innovations into commercial products. In this talk he will talk about some of the challenges, including managing technical risk, usability and some of the pitfalls of project management.

Booking Required

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Victoria Green

Pizza lunch will be provided. Please book via Eventbrite.

Tue 25 Apr 2017 from 15:00 to 16:00

MRC HIU Wednesday Seminar Series

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Novel Technologies For Rapid Generation Of Custom-Designed Animal Models

Dr Matthew Wheeler

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Tue 25 Apr 2017 from 16:00 to 17:00

OPDC Seminar Series (DPAG)

Sherrington Building, Sherrington Library, please note doors are locked at 4pm, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Gene-environment interactions: a success story in Parkinson’s disease

Prof Beate Ritz

Professor Beate Ritz joined the faculty of the School of Public Health at UCLA in 1995 and is currently Professor and Vice Chair of the Epidemiology Department and holds co-appointments in the Environmental Health department at the UCLA School of Public Health and in Neurology, UCLA School of... Read more

Professor Beate Ritz joined the faculty of the School of Public Health at UCLA in 1995 and is currently Professor and Vice Chair of the Epidemiology Department and holds co-appointments in the Environmental Health department at the UCLA School of Public Health and in Neurology, UCLA School of Medicine. Her research focuses on the health effects of occupational and environmental toxins such as pesticides, ionizing radiation, and air pollution on chronic diseases including neurodegenerative and neurodevelopmental disorders (Parkinson's disease, autism cognition), cancers, and adverse birth outcomes and asthma. She previously investigated the causes of cancer in chemical toxin and radiation exposed workers and assessed the impact of ergonomic work-place factors on musculo-skeletal disorders. For the past two decades, she studied the effects of air pollution on adverse birth outcomes as well as asthma, autism, and cancers in children in Southern California. In 2006, she received the Robert M Zweig Memorial award for outstanding achievement in air quality and medicine from the South Coast Air Quality Management District and in 2012 she has been appointed a member of the CA-EPA Scientific Review Panel on Toxic Air Contaminants. Since 1997, she has been investigating the long-term effects of pesticide exposures on Parkinson's disease and cancers and is currently conducting a project to implement a Parkinson's disease registry required by a 2004 law in California. In 2011 she recieved an award from the American Parkinson's Disease Association (APDA) for outstanding contributions to the advancement of Parkinsons research. In her research she uses geographic information system (GIS) modeling of environmental exposures including pesticide use and traffic related air pollution in California and investigates links between genetic susceptibility factors and environmental exposures in populations. She is directing and collaborating in a large number of federally (NIH, DOD), state (California Air Resources Board), and foundation (Michael J Fox Foundation, Komen) funded research projects.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Melanie Witt

Tue 25 Apr 2017 from 16:30 to 18:00

Oxford GCRF Seminars

Oxford GCRF Seminars: Leave no-one behind

Prof Kevin Marsh

This theme's aim is to create new knowledge and drive innovation that helps to ensure that everyone across the globe has access to Secure and resilient food systems supported by sustainable marine resources and agriculture; Sustainable health and well-being; Inclusive and equitable education; Clean... Read more

This theme's aim is to create new knowledge and drive innovation that helps to ensure that everyone across the globe has access to Secure and resilient food systems supported by sustainable marine resources and agriculture; Sustainable health and well-being; Inclusive and equitable education; Clean air, water and sanitation; Affordable, reliable, sustainable energy. These seminars are aimed at established researchers, both at the University of Oxford and other organisations in the UK, interested in working with Oxford on Global Challenges Research Fund programmes. Join this series of four seminars, discussing the challenges and opportunities with the GCRF. Some of our leading scientists from across all four Divisions will share ground breaking ideas in the development of new interdisciplinary collaborations. The reception provides a unique opportunity to delve deeper into the issues and forge new partnerships.

Booking Required

Audience: Members of the University only

Wed 26 Apr 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Assessing the effect of single nucleotide variants on the expression of key human genes

Professor Merlin Crossley

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Thu 27 Apr 2017 from 10:30 to 11:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

Gibson Building, Room 1, Woodstock Road OX2 6HE

Enabling personalised cohort studies from large repositories of clinical practice data.

Dr Blanca Gallega Luxan, Dr Thierry Wendling

While clinicians provide treatment decisions and prognoses for individual patients, traditional models of evidence are mostly based on averages over potentially heterogeneous populations, and often fail to represent patients with common comorbidities or medications. Conventional subgroup analyses... Read more

While clinicians provide treatment decisions and prognoses for individual patients, traditional models of evidence are mostly based on averages over potentially heterogeneous populations, and often fail to represent patients with common comorbidities or medications. Conventional subgroup analyses are ineffective because they tend to subdivide populations based on pre-specified single characteristics. Since there are many circumstances under which treatments may work for some patients but not for others, this lack of personalisation results in inefficient and potentially unsafe care. We work on the extension and validation of methods that can leverage the information contained in large, routinely collected health datasets, by enabling personalised cohort studies on demand. Findings from these studies can be used to crowdsource prioritisation of clinical questions in need of further evidence. They can also provide an avenue to discuss and support treatment recommendations at the point-of-care. Speakers: Dr Blanca Gallego Luxan (B.Phys, M.Sc., Ph.D.): Dr Gallego leads the Health Analytics research program at the Australian Institute of Health Innovation, Macquarie University. Her group generates new methods that enable the use of routinely collected health data to improve and transform healthcare delivery. Trained as a physicist, she obtained a PhD in modelling and predicting climate dynamics from the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). She later on moved to Australia where she worked on environmental economics before joining the Australian Institute of Health Innovation in 2006. Dr Gallego has extensive international research experience in data analysis and computational modelling. She has been the recipient of three research awards, two research fellowships, and over $4 million in funding. Dr Thierry Wendling (Pharm.D., Ph.D.): Dr Wendling graduated in 2012 as a pharmacist at the Faculty of Pharmaceutical and Biological Sciences of the University Paris Descartes (France), where he also completed a Master in Pharmacology. He did his Master Thesis in the department of Clinical Pharmacology at Novartis Institutes for Biomedical Research (NIBR) in Basel (Switzerland), during which he studied the pharmacokinetics of a new intramuscular formulation of an antipsychotic drug. He then graduated with a PhD in Pharmacometrics at Manchester Pharmacy School of the University of Manchester (UK). During his PhD (2013-2015), he worked together with NIBR on the development and application of methods for robust mechanistic (i.e. knowledge-based) modelling of clinical pharmacology data. Since March 2016, Thierry is a post-doctoral researcher in Health Analytics at the Australian Institute of Health Innovation at Macquarie University (Australia). His research interests are now in the fields of evidence-based and personalised medicine, pharmacoepidemiology, machine learning, and clinical informatics. He has been focussing on developing statistical methods that can analyse high-dimensional data from electronic health records to accurately estimate the benefits or harms of medical interventions specifically for individual patients.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr James Sheppard

Thu 27 Apr 2017 from 12:30 to 13:30

WIMM Occasional Seminars

Genomic instability and disease: opportunities for clinical translation

Dr Gabriel Balmus

Genomic instability (GIN) is a central feature of cancer and ageing that if prevented would lead to disease improvement thus representing an important therapeutic avenue. Our cells are constantly bombarded by external (e.g. ionizing radiations) and internal (e.g. replication stress) factors that... Read more

Genomic instability (GIN) is a central feature of cancer and ageing that if prevented would lead to disease improvement thus representing an important therapeutic avenue. Our cells are constantly bombarded by external (e.g. ionizing radiations) and internal (e.g. replication stress) factors that create DNA lesions (DNA damage). These injuries can range from simple nicks to highly toxic double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs) and are counteracted by the DNA damage response (DDR). The DDR comprises a collection of signal transduction pathways that sense DNA damage and trigger appropriate responses such as DNA repair, temporary or permanent cell cycle arrest (senescence), or cell death (apoptosis or autophagy). Failure to implement these responses results in GIN and initiation of diverse pathologies including cancer and ageing. To explore genetic mechanisms of GIN accumulation, we have performed genetic and drug screens aimed at identifying therapeutic opportunities to alleviate disease. Our results show how different nodes in the disease related pathways can be taken advantage off in order to understand cancer cell resistance/relapse to therapies (e.g. in the context of ATM tumour suppressor gene) or delay ageing (e.g. in the context of Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome). Moreover, we use these findings to translate our results to mouse models of disease, pushing closer towards considering these avenues in clinical settings. We emphasize there should be a renewed appreciation both for the importance of studying gene interactions and for addressing these questions in a unified, quantitative manner that will aid the diagnosis and treatment of debilitating disease including cancer and ageing.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Penny Berry

Thu 27 Apr 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Hospital, Lecture Theatre 1

Clinical Immunology / Dermatology

Dr James Gilchrist, Dr Siraj Misbah, Dr Gorav Wali, Dr Noma Mathe

Clinical Immunology: "Adult-onset recurrent bacterial meningitis and immunological red herrings", Dr James Gilchrist and Dr Siraj Misbah -- Dermatology: "Starter for TEN", Dr Noma Mathe and Dr Gorav Wali -- Chair: Prof Chris O'Callaghan

Clinical Immunology: "Adult-onset recurrent bacterial meningitis and immunological red herrings", Dr James Gilchrist and Dr Siraj Misbah -- Dermatology: "Starter for TEN", Dr Noma Mathe and Dr Gorav Wali -- Chair: Prof Chris O'Callaghan

Audience: Public

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Thu 27 Apr 2017 from 17:00 to 18:00

The Hill Expert-in-Residence Programme 2017

John Radcliffe Academic, Tingewick Hall & Foyer, Academic Centre, John Radcliffe Hospital, Headington, Oxford, OX3 9DU, Headington OX3 9DU

Digital Health Experts in Residence

Stefania Marcoli, Neil Bacon, Alex Pasteur, June Thomson, David Cole

As part of the parent programme being run by the Medical Sciences Division at the University of Oxford, TheHill team are delighted to announce that we will be running a five-month long "Digital Health Experts in Residence" programme, with five fantastic industry experts 'in residence' for one day... Read more

As part of the parent programme being run by the Medical Sciences Division at the University of Oxford, TheHill team are delighted to announce that we will be running a five-month long "Digital Health Experts in Residence" programme, with five fantastic industry experts 'in residence' for one day per month, with a half-day of 1-on-1 sessions, followed by a public evening seminar, each on the final Thursday of the month from April through to August. This programme gives the community access to world-leading expertise and advice. Clinicians, engineers, entrepreneurs, researchers, students and others can arrange meetings with our experts to discuss their ideas and projects with no strings attached. We expect that this advice and support will help scientists develop the translational strategy for their projects/technologies. We will also be running evening seminars on these evenings, on topics to raise the level of awareness and understanding of realities of technological development and commercialisation. More information on our Experts-in-Residence can be found on TheHill website - http://www.thehill.co/experts-in-residence/ Our first EiR evening seminar will be a panel discussion with our experts and several leading figures from Oxford, and will be held in the Tingewick Hall of the John Radcliffe Hospital, followed by a short drinks reception in the Tingewick Foyer. Please book your place for that evening here: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/the-hill-experts-in-residence-april-27th-tickets-33677512346?aff=ehomecard Also, if you are interested in talking with one of our experts on the afternoon of Thursday 27th April, please email geraldine.murphy@oxfordahsn.org. We have a limited number of slots, so please register early to avoid disappointment.

Booking Required

Audience: Public

Organisers: The Hill

Part of a series to run last Thursday of the month in April, May, June, July and August

Fri 28 Apr 2017 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

'Gastric bypass; from intestinal glucose transport to diabetes. What is the expected duration?'

Professor François Pattou

François Pattou is Professor of Surgery at the Faculty of Medicine of Lille, France, and Head of the Department of General and Endocrine Surgery at Lille University Hospital. Professor Pattou also leads a research group at the University of Lille, INSERM U1190, devoted to the clinical development... Read more

François Pattou is Professor of Surgery at the Faculty of Medicine of Lille, France, and Head of the Department of General and Endocrine Surgery at Lille University Hospital. Professor Pattou also leads a research group at the University of Lille, INSERM U1190, devoted to the clinical development of biotherapies for treating diabetes and a funding member of the LABEX European Genomic Institute for Diabetes (EGID). Professor Pattou’s research is devoted to the surgical treatment of endocrine and metabolic diseases and focused on cell therapy for type 1 diabetes and metabolic surgery for type 2 diabetes. He has authored more than 250 papers in peer review journals. He is also the principal investigator of several ongoing clinical trials of islet cell transplantation and metabolic surgery. The recipient of numerous research grants from national and international institutions (European Commission, Innovative Medicine Initiative, Agence Nationale de la Recherche, Juvenile Diabete Research Fundation, Fondation Francophone pour le recherche sur le diabète), Professor Pattou has been awarded by several prizes (National Academy of Medicine, Rachmine Levine scientific achievement award, Matmut award).

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 28 Apr 2017 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Analysis of gonorrhoea in coastal Kenya

Dr Ana Cehovin

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 28 Apr 2017 from 11:00 to 11:45

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

CHD7 in CHARGE: the implications of neural crest specific regulation of chromatin remodeller CHD7 in CHARGE syndrome

Günes Taylor

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

VIVA SEMINAR

Fri 28 Apr 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, DPAG, Large Lecture Theatre, Sherrington Building, off South Parks and Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PT - 01865 272500, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

GUEST SPEAKER Professor Adrian Hobbs, Professor of Cardiovascular Pharmacology QMUL : ‘Pivotal Cardiovascular Homeostatic role for C-type natriuretic peptide’

Professor Adrian Hobbs

‘C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) is highly concentrated in endothelial cells but its physiological role(s) in the cardiovascular system are poorly defined. Prof. Hobbs’ lab has a long-standing interest in the physiology, pathophysiology and pharmacology of this peptide, and developed novel... Read more

‘C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) is highly concentrated in endothelial cells but its physiological role(s) in the cardiovascular system are poorly defined. Prof. Hobbs’ lab has a long-standing interest in the physiology, pathophysiology and pharmacology of this peptide, and developed novel pharmacological and genetic tools to dissect the key processes CNP regulates in both the vasculature and the heart.’ His work has identified a fundamental vasoprotective role of endothelium-derived CNP in modulating vascular tone, blood vessel morphology, the reactivity of leukocytes and platelets, and the development of atheroma and aneurism. More recently, these approaches have revealed critical physiological and pathological roles of CNP in the myocardium.’

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sarah Noujaim

Fri 28 Apr 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

SGC Seminars

NDM Building, TDI Basement seminar room, Headington OX3 7FZ

A vision for an academic-industry hybrid type 2 diabetes early biology research institute in Oxford

Prof Jim Johnson

Biosketch – 2017 NNRCO Launch James D. Johnson, Ph.D. Jim Johnson is Professor in the Department of Cellular and Physiological Sciences, and the Department of Surgery at the University of British Columbia, in Vancouver Canada. He is also Leader of the Life Sciences Institute Diabetes Research... Read more

Biosketch – 2017 NNRCO Launch James D. Johnson, Ph.D. Jim Johnson is Professor in the Department of Cellular and Physiological Sciences, and the Department of Surgery at the University of British Columbia, in Vancouver Canada. He is also Leader of the Life Sciences Institute Diabetes Research Group. He is co-founder of the Institute for Personalized Therapeutic Nutrition, a non-profit that seeks to translate his studies on hyperinsulinemia into personalized therapeutic nutrition guidelines. He was recently appointed inaugural Director of the Novo Nordisk Research Centre in Oxford, a new hybrid academic-industry Institute that will focus on the fundamental biology of type 2 diabetes. In Oxford, he is a Senior Fellow at Harris-Manchester College. He started his independent laboratory at UBC in 2004, after a post-doctoral fellowship on diabetes research with Ken Polonsky and Stan Misler at Washington University in St. Louis, and PhD training on pituitary physiology with John Chang at the University of Alberta. A world-leader in the fundamental biology of pancreatic islets, insulin action, diabetes and related conditions, he is the author of >115 peer-reviewed articles since 2000. His research has been published in prestigious journals including Cell Metabolism, Nature Communications, PNAS, Diabetes, and Diabetologia. Prof. Johnson is Editor-in-Chief of the journal Islets, and on the Editorial Boards of Diabetes and Endocrinology. He is dedicated to training the next generation of scientists, with several who are now successful professors or senior scientists. Prof. Johnson was named the top research under 45 by the Canadian Diabetes Association in 2016, and has held grants and scholarships from this agency and others. Jim is actively involved in outreach and science-related discourse on Twitter @JimJohnsonSci.

Audience: Public

Organisers: Natsumi Astley

Fri 28 Apr 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM Science Career Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

A career as a Patent Attorney

Dr Kapil Tuladhar

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Alice Mayer