Seminars

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Wed 1 Nov 2017 from 12:00 to 13:00

Department of Oncology

Old Road Campus Research Building, Meeting Rooms 71a, b and c, Headington OX3 7DQ

Polyadenylation as a therapeutic target in cancer

Cornelia H. de Moor, PhD

Audience: Members of the University only

Wed 1 Nov 2017 from 13:30 to 14:30

MRC HIU Wednesday Seminar Series

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Asymmetric signaling endosomes in asymmetric division

Professor Marcos Gonzalez-Gaitan

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Thu 2 Nov 2017 from 10:00 to 11:00

WIMM Occasional Seminars

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

“Definition and Analysis of an MLL-AF4 Gene Regulatory Network”

Ross Thorne

Audience: Members of the University only

Thu 2 Nov 2017 from 10:30 to 11:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

St Luke's Chapel, Woodstock Road OX2 6GG

It is not too late to claim your PPI - Talking honestly about patient and public involvement in the real world

Lynne Maddocks

Come and hear what it is really like and learn from the experiences of your colleagues- an open chance to share problems and queries Lynne Maddocks: Chairing your discussion Tricia Carver: Involving children in PPI Sarah Morrish: Running a virtual PPI group Jack O’Sullivan: Obtaining PPI... Read more

Come and hear what it is really like and learn from the experiences of your colleagues- an open chance to share problems and queries Lynne Maddocks: Chairing your discussion Tricia Carver: Involving children in PPI Sarah Morrish: Running a virtual PPI group Jack O’Sullivan: Obtaining PPI before you have funding Cynthia Srikesavan: Involving people in multi-stage testing Pip Bianchi: Making an advisory group meeting fun

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Lynne Maddocks

Thu 2 Nov 2017 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, Basement seminar room, TDI, Headington OX3 7FZ

Developing new models of CRC for stratifying therapy

Prof Owen Sansom

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Christina Woodward

Thu 2 Nov 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Dermatology / Jenner Institute

Dr Pedro Folegatti, Dr Sarah Gilbert, Dr Crystal Williams, Dr Rich Timms, Dr Greg-Neil Smith

Dermatology: "You look like a fungi to be with", Dr Crystal Williams, Dr Rich Timms and Dr Greg-Neil Smith -- Jenner Institute: "Flu vaccines for the elderly – how to improve on 0% efficacy", Dr Pedro Folegatti and Dr Sarah Gilbert -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Dermatology: "You look like a fungi to be with", Dr Crystal Williams, Dr Rich Timms and Dr Greg-Neil Smith -- Jenner Institute: "Flu vaccines for the elderly – how to improve on 0% efficacy", Dr Pedro Folegatti and Dr Sarah Gilbert -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Audience: Public

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Thu 2 Nov 2017 from 16:30 to 17:30

Experimental Medicine TGU Seminars

John Radcliffe Hospital - Main Building, Level 3 GPEC Seminar Room 2B, Headington OX3 9DU

Fri 3 Nov 2017 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Médecins Sans Frontières: The Role of Humanitarian Aid in Global Surgery

Professor Kathryn Chu

Kathryn Chu received her undergraduate degree at Stanford University. She graduated from the University of California-San Francisco School of Medicine where she also completed her general surgery residency. She was a colorectal fellow at the Lahey Clinic then joined the faculty at Johns Hopkins... Read more

Kathryn Chu received her undergraduate degree at Stanford University. She graduated from the University of California-San Francisco School of Medicine where she also completed her general surgery residency. She was a colorectal fellow at the Lahey Clinic then joined the faculty at Johns Hopkins Medical Institution as a colorectal surgeon. In 2007, she left academic practice to join Medecins Sans Frontieres as a surgeon and advisor where she worked for 4 years. She currently serves on the board of directors of MSF-Southern Africa. From 2012-4 she worked for Harvard Medical School in Rwanda training surgeons under the Human Resources for Health Program. Since 2014 she has worked in South Africa and is an associate professor at the University of Cape Town. Her research interests are in global surgery, in particular surgical delivery during humanitarian disasters and equitable access to surgical care.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 3 Nov 2017 from 12:00 to 13:00

Jenner Seminars

NDM Building, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 7FZ

Vaccination in crises: Minimizing the “muddle through”

Dr Rebecca Grais

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Lisbeth Soederberg

Fri 3 Nov 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, DPAG, Sherrington Library, Sherrington Building, off South Parks and Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PT - 01865 272500, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

BPS Bill Bowman Lecture & Burdon Sanderson Cardiac Science Seminar: Dr Aisah Aubdool, William Harvey Research Institute, QMUL - ‘Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide: A Neuropeptide of Many Talents in the Cardiovascular System"

Dr Aisah Aubdool

Sensory nerves contain and release the highly potent vasodilator calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). Whilst blocking the action of CGRP does not influence blood pressure regulation in healthy individuals, deletion or blockade of CGRP activity can worsen cardiovascular diseases in various animal... Read more

Sensory nerves contain and release the highly potent vasodilator calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). Whilst blocking the action of CGRP does not influence blood pressure regulation in healthy individuals, deletion or blockade of CGRP activity can worsen cardiovascular diseases in various animal models. Transient receptor potential ankyrin-1 (TRPA1) are non-selective cation channels that are widely expressed on sensory nerves, and using a murine model of local environmental cold exposure, we demonstrated that TRPA1 acts a primary vascular cold sensor. The cold-induced vascular response consists of vasoconstriction followed by vasodilatation. This vasodilator phase is critical for protecting the cutaneous tissues against cold injury. We have now identified that TRPA1 activation is required to initiate the constrictor response as well as the subsequent dilator response, mediated by the sensory nerve-derived dilator CGRP and nitric oxide. This highlights the major involvement of the TRPA1-CGRP dilator pathway in the physiological reflex to local cold exposure, and provides impetus for further research in developing therapeutic agents aimed at protecting the skin in peripheral vascular disease and adverse climates. However, the influence of the TRPA1-CGRP pathway is less easy to determine systemically in the cardiovascular system. Whilst TRPA1 deletion had no effect on blood pressure changes in hypertension, CGRP deletion led to a worsened hypertensive phenotype. Understanding the extent of the hypotensive properties of CGRP on cardiovascular protection will enable us to develop feasible ways to increase CGRP activity as a potential effective therapy for cardiovascular diseases. Our most recent findings supplemented this hypothesis; using a novel long lasting CGRP analogue in collaboration with Novo Nordisk we demonstrated that chronic treatment with a CGRP agonist protects against hypertension, reducing blood pressure, vascular, renal and cardiac hypertrophy, fibrosis and oxidative stress. These protective effects are consistent with further experiments in a model of heart failure where the CGRP agonist preserves cardiac function, and prevents cardiac remodelling and limits damage associated with the progression of heart failure. Whilst the activity of TRPA1 to release CGRP from sensory nerves appear to be site and stimulus specific, the role of CGRP, more generally when released endogenously or administered exogenously appears to be pivotal in cardiovascular disease. Our current findings provide evidence for a potential novel therapeutic strategy, with the concept that CGRP agonists are anti-hypertensive and cardioprotective, with limited adverse effects when treatment starts early onset of hypertension or heart failure.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sarah Noujaim

Fri 3 Nov 2017 from 15:30 to 17:00

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

St Luke's Chapel, Woodstock Road OX2 6GG

The new UK Life Sciences Strategy: implications for the Oxford regional innovation system

Dr Glenn Wells, Dr Nick Scott-Ram, Dr Marc Ventresca,

The UK should invest hundreds of millions of pounds in high-risk research programs and “moon shot” projects, according to a report on the Government's new Life Sciences Industrial Strategy. The report calls for investment in fields such as genomics, artificial intelligence, and digital health,... Read more

The UK should invest hundreds of millions of pounds in high-risk research programs and “moon shot” projects, according to a report on the Government's new Life Sciences Industrial Strategy. The report calls for investment in fields such as genomics, artificial intelligence, and digital health, to help pave the way for the emergence of entirely new industries in the UK over the next ten years. Such a vision requires sustained funding for science and infrastructure, as well as supporting formation of stronger strategic partnerships between universities, industry, and the NHS. Featuring presentations from well-placed guest speakers and audience discussion, this seminar will explore the opportunities and challenges for Oxford’s Biomedical Research Centre, Academic Health Science Centre, and Academic Health Science Network in helping to realize these ambitious goals in Oxford and the surrounding region. Speakers: Dr Glenn Wells Chief Operating Officer, Oxford Academic Health Science Centre Dr Nick Scott-Ram Director of Commercial Development Oxford Academic Health Science Network Dr Marc Ventresca Associate Professor of Strategic Management Said Business School, University of Oxford Chair: Professor Trish Greenhalgh Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences The seminar is co-organized by the Partnership for Health Wealth and Innovation Theme, NIHR Oxford BRC, and Health Policy and Systems Network, Green Templeton College.

Booking Required

Audience: Public

Organisers: Dr Alex Rushford

Mon 6 Nov 2017 from 11:00 to 12:00

Department of Oncology

Old Road Campus Research Building, Meeting rooms 71a, b and c, Headington OX3 7DQ

Schizophrenic DNA repair: establishment and instability of a RNA/DNA hybrid genome

Giovanni Maga PhD

Audience: Members of the University only

Mon 6 Nov 2017 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Sweet immunomodulation

Dr Luisa Martinez-Pomares

LUISA MARTINEZ-POMARES is Associate Professor at the School of Life Sciences, University of Nottingham. The main focus of her work is to unravel the contribution of lectin receptors to the modulation of immune responses. Luisa is recognized, in particular, for her research on the mannose receptor... Read more

LUISA MARTINEZ-POMARES is Associate Professor at the School of Life Sciences, University of Nottingham. The main focus of her work is to unravel the contribution of lectin receptors to the modulation of immune responses. Luisa is recognized, in particular, for her research on the mannose receptor (CD206, MR) [J. Leuk. Biol. (2012)92(6):1177-86]. Luisa is Section Editor Journal of Leukocyte Biology and Associate Editor Molecular Antigen Presenting Cell Biology Section of Frontiers in Immunology. Luisa trained as a virologist working on African Swine Fever virus for her PhD at Universidad Autonoma de Madrid and Rabbitpox virus during her Post-Doctoral research at the University of Florida. After developing an immense curiosity for the workings of the immune system, Luisa joined Prof Siamon Gordon’s laboratory at Oxford University in 1994. At Oxford Luisa investigated binding properties, tissue expression and contribution to antigen presentation of MR. Findings on MR fuelled her interest on macrophage heterogeneity in lymphoid organs; specifically metallophilic macrophages in the spleen and subcapsular sinus macrophages in lymph nodes which play important roles in antigen handling. Luisa joined the University of Nottingham in 2005 where she continued and expanded her interest on MR unveiling, among others, its important contribution to allergen recognition and promotion of Th2 differentiation. Current work at Luisa’s lab funded by the MRC and CRUK focuses on the use of novel high affinity MR ligands developed in collaboration with Drs Mantovani and Mastrotto (University of Nottingham) to modulate macrophage activation. In addition Luisa has initiated a research programme on bacteria pathogenesis in collaboration with Profs Camara and Williams (University of Nottingham). Current research funded by the MRC focuses on the contribution of MR and another important C-type lectin receptor, DC-SIGN (CD209), to chronic infection with the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Laura Sánchez Lazo

Mon 6 Nov 2017 from 12:30 to 13:30

Tropical Medicine Seminars

Webinar: Managing uncertainty in clinical trials: the role of adaptive trial designs

Professor Steve Webb

Uncertainty about populations, interventions, comparators, effect size, and heterogeneity of treatment effect, applies to all clinical trials, but it particularly affects trials that test the effectiveness of interventions during epidemics. Another major challenge to conducting clinical trials... Read more

Uncertainty about populations, interventions, comparators, effect size, and heterogeneity of treatment effect, applies to all clinical trials, but it particularly affects trials that test the effectiveness of interventions during epidemics. Another major challenge to conducting clinical trials during fast-moving epidemics is the lead-time needed to commence them. This presentation will discuss adaptive trial design as well as how such trials can deal with uncertainty and be implement-ready (but modifiable) prior to an epidemic.

Booking Required

Audience: Public

Organisers: Giuseppe Paparella

The webinar will be recorded and later made available on the public facing website of GloPID-R

Mon 6 Nov 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM MONDAY SEMINARS

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Mitochondrial DNA disease: challenges and solutions

Professor Sir Doug Turnbull

Audience: Public

Organisers: Linda Roberts

Mon 6 Nov 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

NDM Seminar Series

Henry Wellcome Building of Cellular and Molecular Physiology, Seminar Rooms A&B, Roosevelt Drive OX3 7BN

Mon 6 Nov 2017 from 14:00 to 15:00

ARUK Oxford Drug Discovery Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, Basement Seminar Room, Headington OX3 7FZ

Synaptic and immune system changes in the brains of mice with rising amyloid beta. Can we improve mouse models for Alzheimer's disease?

Professor Frances Edwards

Frances Edwards is Professor of Neurodegeneration at the Department of Neuroscience Physiology and Pharmacology, University College London. Frances is also currently affiliated with the Editorial Boards of FEBS Letters and BMC Neuroscience, the Chair of Examiners for MSc Neuroscience at UCL, and is... Read more

Frances Edwards is Professor of Neurodegeneration at the Department of Neuroscience Physiology and Pharmacology, University College London. Frances is also currently affiliated with the Editorial Boards of FEBS Letters and BMC Neuroscience, the Chair of Examiners for MSc Neuroscience at UCL, and is a Core member of Institute of Healthy Ageing at UCL. Alzheimer’s disease is a devastating condition and its increasing prevalence in our ageing society imposes an increasing personal and financial burden. So far there is no treatment available to prevent, cure or delay its progression and this has become one of the most urgent challenges of our time. A major impediment to progress has been the lack of animal models in which rising amyloid beta leads to Tau pathology and consequent neurodegeneration. The models we have are however useful for understanding the earliest changes that occur as amyloid beta rises in the brain. In this seminar I present our results on the earliest synaptic changes and the interaction of amyloid pathology and the immune system in mouse models of Alzheimer’s disease. How do changes in mouse models relate to our knowledge of the human condition and how can we use this information to develop improved animal models?

Audience: Public

Organisers: Keely Jones

Tue 7 Nov 2017 from 10:30 to 11:30

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Tue 7 Nov 2017 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Leukocyte navigation in complex environments

Dr Michael Sixt

Michael Sixt's laboratory is interested in morphodynamic processes both at the cellular and at the tissue level. We mainly focus on the immune system and try to understand the molecular and mechanical principles underlying leukocyte dynamics during processes such as migration and intercellular... Read more

Michael Sixt's laboratory is interested in morphodynamic processes both at the cellular and at the tissue level. We mainly focus on the immune system and try to understand the molecular and mechanical principles underlying leukocyte dynamics during processes such as migration and intercellular communication. Here we work at the interface of cell biology, immunology and biophysics and currently investigate how the cytoskeleton generates force to deform the cell body, how this force is transduced to the extracellular environment and how the cells are polarized and guided within tissues. To obtain a holistic view of the process we are also studying tissue architecture as well as the distribution and presentation of guidance cues (chemokines) within these tissues. We developed a number of in vitro tools that allow us to observe cytoskeletal dynamics in real time using different life cell imaging approaches. These are all based on advanced light microscopy like total internal reflection, fast confocal and multiphoton technology. We combine these approaches with genetic and pharmacological interference as well as substrate manipulations like surface micropatterning and microfluidics. A general aim of the lab is to test in vitro findings also in the context of living tissues. To this end we also developed ex vivo (tissue explant) and in vivo imaging setups that allow us to monitor leukocytes together with their physiological environment. Finally we are also interested to test the implications of our findings for physiological immune responses.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Laura Sánchez Lazo

Tue 7 Nov 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Floor meeting - 2 groups will give an update on the research work in their laboratory

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Tue 7 Nov 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

Richard Doll Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Richard Doll Seminar: The genetic analysis of biomedical big data

Professor Gil McVean

Audience: Members of the University only

Wed 8 Nov 2017 from 10:30 to 11:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

St Luke's Chapel, Woodstock Road OX2 6GG

Engagement between the NHS and industry on digital health

Tony Bowden, Sara Shaw

My experiences of growing a digital health company in the UK - Tony Bowden, Chief Executive Officer, Helicon Health At a time when NHS resources are apparently stretched to breaking point, you could be forgiven for thinking that a digital platform for stroke prevention would be a no brainer for... Read more

My experiences of growing a digital health company in the UK - Tony Bowden, Chief Executive Officer, Helicon Health At a time when NHS resources are apparently stretched to breaking point, you could be forgiven for thinking that a digital platform for stroke prevention would be a no brainer for most health economies. Drawing on recent experience, Tony will present insights on what works and what doesn’t or hasn’t and will bring colour and texture to the result. Why is it so hard for industry to work with the NHS? - Sara Shaw, Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Science, University of Oxford There is a strong policy push in the UK to harness the potential of digital technologies, with the NHS and industry regarded as key to delivering this. However, despite repeated attempts to facilitate cross-sector working in the name of ‘innovation’, ‘accelerated access’ or ‘new models of care’, the NHS and industry often struggle to fully engage. Drawing on recent national-level interviews with executives from industry, policy and practice, this presentation will explore the reasons why industry finds it so hard to work with the NHS. BIOGRAPHIES Tony Bowden, Chief Executive Officer, Helicon Health Ltd. (www.heliconhealth.co.uk) Tony was appointed Chief Executive Officer of Helicon Health in May 2015, having advised the Board on Strategy and Business Development for the preceding year. Tony has over 30 years leadership experience in the Healthcare and Education technology sectors, during which time he founded and led two early stage businesses in the UK and Europe and acted as Business Development Director for both iSOFT & Computer Science Corporation Healthcare division. Tony has a wealth of experience in taking healthcare and education technology companies to highly successful exits with multi-national companies such as IBM, CSC and Discovery Communications. Tony is a Partner and Deputy Chair at The IT Health Partnership, advising the NHS and suppliers to the NHS and private healthcare sectors in the drive towards joining up digital health and care. His early career was spent at Thorn Software (which became IBM Global Services) where he developed and ran the London based vertical market division, for which he had full P&L responsibility across Healthcare, Public Sector and Financial Services. Tony is an angel investor in a number of high growth start-ups. He is passionate about supporting SMEs and promoting their role in driving economic growth and prosperity. Sara Shaw - Senior Researcher, co-Lead of the Interdisciplinary Research in Health Sciences (IRIHS) Research Group, Department of Primary Care Health Sciences, and Fellow at Green Templeton College Dr Sara Shaw is a Senior Researcher at the University of Oxford. She has a background in medical sociology and policy studies and her research focuses on the organisation and development of healthcare policy and practice. Her particular interests lie in the development of health and social policies, how these are understood and interpreted by patients, practitioners, professionals and policymakers, and how policies shape organisational processes, routines and decision-making. She has considerable experience of developing and applying qualitative methods and has undertaken work on topics ranging from NHS commissioning and integrated care to health research policy and research governance. Sara is committed to working across boundaries. In addition to her position at University of Oxford, she is Honorary Reader at Queen Mary University of London and Visiting Senior Fellow at the Nuffield Trust, an independent UK charity focused on researching health policy and the organisation and delivery of health care. She has undertaken work for the Department of Health, Royal College of General Practitioners, Faculty of Public Health, National Institute for Health Research and NHS R&D Forum. She is on the Editorial Board of Sociology of Health & Illness, is Associate Editor for BMC Health Services Research; and has published widely on topics including shaping national health research policy, critical approaches to understanding and analysing policy and the organisation of health and social care.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Chrysanthi Papoutsi

Wed 8 Nov 2017 from 13:30 to 14:30

Richard Doll Seminars

Big Data Institute, BDI LG Seminar Room 0, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Richard Doll Seminar: Complexity of Susceptibility to Cancer

Dr Stephen Chanock

Dr Chanock is a leading expert in the discovery and characterisation of cancer susceptibility regions in the human genome. He has received numerous awards for his scientific contributions to our understanding of common inherited genetic variants associated with cancer risk and outcomes. Dr Chanock... Read more

Dr Chanock is a leading expert in the discovery and characterisation of cancer susceptibility regions in the human genome. He has received numerous awards for his scientific contributions to our understanding of common inherited genetic variants associated with cancer risk and outcomes. Dr Chanock received his M.D. from Harvard Medical School and completed clinical training at Boston Children’s Hospital and the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston. From 2001-7, he was a tenured investigator in the Genomic Variation Section of the Pediatric Oncology Branch in the NCI Center for Cancer Research and also served as co-chair of NCI's Genetics, Genomics and Proteomics Faculty. In 2001, he was appointed as Chief of the Cancer Genomics Research Laboratory, and in 2007 as Chief of the Laboratory of Translational Genomics, both within DCEG. From 2012-3, he served as Acting Co-Director of the NCI Center for Cancer Genomics and was appointed Director of DCEG in 2013. Since 1995, Dr Chanock has served as the Medical Director for Camp Fantastic, a week-long recreational camp for paediatric cancer patients.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Natasha Bowyer

Note change to usual location: LG Seminar Rooms, Big Data Institute, Old Road Campus

Thu 9 Nov 2017 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, TDI, Basement meeting room, NDM Research Building, Headington OX3 7FZ

Breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility: what have we learned from large international consortia?

Dr Antonis Antoniou

Advances in genomic technologies have enabled more rapid, less expensive genetic sequencing than was possible a few years ago. These technologies allow for the comprehensive genetic profiling for assessing risks to breast and ovarian cancers and include multiplex sequencing panels of several genes... Read more

Advances in genomic technologies have enabled more rapid, less expensive genetic sequencing than was possible a few years ago. These technologies allow for the comprehensive genetic profiling for assessing risks to breast and ovarian cancers and include multiplex sequencing panels of several genes and panels of common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). However, the clinical utility of such multiplex gene and SNP panels depends on having accurate estimates of cancer risks for mutations in the genes included in such panels as well as cancer risk prediction models that consider the multifactorial aetiology to cancer susceptibility. Over the past decade international consortia, such as the Breast and Ovarian Cancer Association Consortia, the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 and the International BRCA1/2 Carrier Cohort Study have enabled us to accurately characterise the cancer risks for rare and common cancer susceptibility genetic variants; to understand how the genetic variants interact with each other; and how genetic variants interact with other lifestyle/hormonal risk factors for the disease. The presentation will review the key recent advances by these international consortia and how these are helping us to realise a more personalised risk-based cancer prevention and cancer control.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Christina Woodward

Thu 9 Nov 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Cardiology / OCDEM

Dr Neil Herring, Dr Christine May

Cardiology: "Weathering a VT storm", Dr Neil Herring -- OCDEM: "Cortisol - highlights and pitfalls", Dr Christine May -- Chair: Prof Chris Pugh

Cardiology: "Weathering a VT storm", Dr Neil Herring -- OCDEM: "Cortisol - highlights and pitfalls", Dr Christine May -- Chair: Prof Chris Pugh

Audience: Public

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Thu 9 Nov 2017 from 13:30 to 14:30

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Glucocorticoid receptor action in osteoimmunology

Prof Jan Tuckermann

Glucocorticoids (GCs) as stress hormones have pleiotropic roles controlling metabolism, inflammation and tissue integrity. GCs can have beneficial effects, such as suppression of inflammation but also elicit adverse effects such as insulin resistance and osteoporosis. Using conditional mutant mice... Read more

Glucocorticoids (GCs) as stress hormones have pleiotropic roles controlling metabolism, inflammation and tissue integrity. GCs can have beneficial effects, such as suppression of inflammation but also elicit adverse effects such as insulin resistance and osteoporosis. Using conditional mutant mice we defined the tissue specfic requirements of the GR and its molecular mechanism for GC effects. I will present a non-canonical role of GR in controlling inflammation and demonstrate novel functional target genes of GR controling bone integrity. Our findings about the physiological functions of the GR are necessary to modify rationales for steroid application and to understand stress-associated diseases. Prof. Dr. Tuckermann studied Biology performed his graduate studies in the labs of Peter Herrlich (Karlsruhe, Germany) and Peter Angel (Heidelberg, Germany) and his postdoc with Günther Schütz (Heidelberg, Germany). He then worked as a group leader in at the Fritz LIpmann Institute (Jena, Germany) and was appointed as a full professor to head the Institute of Comparative Molecular Endocrinology at the University of Ulm (Germany). Dr. Tuckermann made major contributions to the molecular mechanisms of corticosteroids in beneficial and side effects of steroid therapy. With the help of conditional and function selective knockout mice for the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) he identified the critical cell types and novel mechanisms for anti-inflammatory activities of glucocorticoids in different inflammatory disease models. A second focus of his work contents the effects of glucocorticoids on bone integrity, since glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis is the most secondary osteoporosis.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Laura Sánchez Lazo

Thu 9 Nov 2017 from 14:00 to 15:00

Jenner Seminars

Old Road Campus Research Building, Seminar Room, Lower Ground Floor , Headington OX3 7DQ

Development of a Human Adenovirus 5 Ebola Vaccine

Dr Xuefeng Yu (CEO), Dr Dongxu Qui (CBO)

Audience: Members of the University only

Fri 10 Nov 2017 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Challenges of being an academic surgeon and journal editor

Professor Prokar Dasgupta

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 10 Nov 2017 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Gp130 defects as cause of immunodeficiency and craniosynostosis

Dr Dominik Aschenbrenner

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 10 Nov 2017 from 12:00 to 13:00

CNCB Seminar Series

Oxford Martin School, 34 Broad Street OX1 3BD

Ensemble Coding in Amygdala Circuits

Andreas Luthi

Classical fear conditioning is one of the most powerful models for studying the neuronal substrates of associative learning and for investigating how plasticity in defined neuronal circuits causes behavioral changes. In my talk, I will focus on the organization and function of the neuronal... Read more

Classical fear conditioning is one of the most powerful models for studying the neuronal substrates of associative learning and for investigating how plasticity in defined neuronal circuits causes behavioral changes. In my talk, I will focus on the organization and function of the neuronal circuitry of fear. I will discuss how functionally, anatomically, and genetically defined types of amygdala neuron are precisely connected within the local circuitry and within larger-scale neuronal networks, and how they contribute to the acquisition and expression of conditioned fear behavior.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Fiona Woods

Fri 10 Nov 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, DPAG, Large Lecture Theatre, Sherrington Building, off South Parks and Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PT - 01865 272500, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Fri 10 Nov 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM Science Career Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Fostering the next generation of scientists: Could we do better?

Dr Gary McDowell

Gary McDowell is Executive Director of Future of Research (FoR), a non-profit organization in the US aimed at improving the scientific research endeavor, with a focus on early career researchers. He has been appointed to the National Academies of Science, Engineering and Medicine “Next... Read more

Gary McDowell is Executive Director of Future of Research (FoR), a non-profit organization in the US aimed at improving the scientific research endeavor, with a focus on early career researchers. He has been appointed to the National Academies of Science, Engineering and Medicine “Next Generation Researchers Initiative” study, which is examining the policy and programmatic steps required to ensure the successful launch and sustainment of careers among the next generation of researchers in biomedical sciences in the US, including the full range of NIH-supported health sciences.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Alice Mayer

Mon 13 Nov 2017 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Innate host defence: a playing field for the ubiquitin machinery

Dr Mads Gyrd Hansen

The Gyrd-Hansen laboratory studies molecular mechanisms governing pro-inflammatory signalling during innate immune responses. Through this, they aim to understand the molecular mechanisms that on one hand protect against pathogens, but that also contribute to chronic inflammation, tumor development... Read more

The Gyrd-Hansen laboratory studies molecular mechanisms governing pro-inflammatory signalling during innate immune responses. Through this, they aim to understand the molecular mechanisms that on one hand protect against pathogens, but that also contribute to chronic inflammation, tumor development and cancer progression. A central focus of the lab is to elucidate the role and regulation of non-degradative ubiquitin modifications in these processes. Ultimately, they aim to identify ubiquitin-handling factors that can be targeted to modulate inflammation and antagonize cancer. Professor Gyrd-Hansen’s recent work has focused on the role of Met1-linked ubiquitin chains (also known as linear ubiquitin chains) in inflammatory signaling. These chains are generated by the Linear UBiquitin Assembly Complex (LUBAC), which is a key component of inflammatory signaling pathways, including those activated downstream of the cytoplasmic PRRs NOD1 and NOD2 that serve as sensors for intracellular bacteria. They have uncovered and characterised several factors that regulate the function of LUBAC in signaling. Future work in the group will focus on elucidating the function, regulation and interplay of individual ubiquitin chain types (of which there are at least eight) in the cellular response to infection.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Professor Irina Udalova

Mon 13 Nov 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM MONDAY SEMINARS

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Zika virus interactions with host cells and tropism

Dr Alain Kohl

Audience: Public

Organisers: Linda Roberts

Mon 13 Nov 2017 from 15:00 to 16:00

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

St Luke's Chapel, Woodstock Road OX2 6GG

Meat, Health & Global Food Security

Professor Andrew Salter

Meat represents an important source of high quality dietary protein and key micronutrients (particularly iron, zinc and vitamin B12) for a large proportion of the global population. However, excessive consumption has been associated with increased susceptibility to a range of chronic diseases,... Read more

Meat represents an important source of high quality dietary protein and key micronutrients (particularly iron, zinc and vitamin B12) for a large proportion of the global population. However, excessive consumption has been associated with increased susceptibility to a range of chronic diseases, including cardiovascular disease, type 2-diabetes and colorectal cancer. Furthermore, in the face of population growth and global warming, there is also increasing concern about the sustainability of farm animal production. My talk will briefly describe some of the work we are involved in to develop novel feed ingredients in improve the sustainability of meat product alongside strategies for reducing intake in developed countries. For example, we have demonstrated that insect larvae may represent an alternative high value protein source to commonly used feed ingredients such as soya and fish meal. In the ‘Eat Less Meat’ study, healthy, non-obese omnivores were provided with a range of non-meat alternative and challenged to reduce their fresh and processed red meat intake by 50% for 3 months. Most participants comfortably achieved the target and this was accompanied by modest reductions in total and LDL cholesterol in males, but not females. However, this was also accompanied by some potentially detrimental effects on haematological variables, with 40% of subjects displaying neutropenic profiles. The implications of this work on the future meat production and consumption will be discussed.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Prof. Susan Jebb

Tue 14 Nov 2017 from 12:00 to 14:00

Tropical Medicine Seminars

NDM Building, Basement seminar room, Headington OX3 7FZ

High profile seminar: Antimalarial drug resistance

Professor Sir Nick White

A highly drug resistant falciparum malaria parasite lineage from western Cambodia, which the press have dubbed a “malaria superbug” has spread to Thailand, Laos and now southern Vietnam. This is a serious threat to malaria control and eradication efforts. In the light of these recent... Read more

A highly drug resistant falciparum malaria parasite lineage from western Cambodia, which the press have dubbed a “malaria superbug” has spread to Thailand, Laos and now southern Vietnam. This is a serious threat to malaria control and eradication efforts. In the light of these recent developments, Professor Sir Nick White will talk about Antimalarial Drug Resistance. Lunch will be provided. This seminar will be followed by RSTMH presenting their new strategy.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Claire-Lise Kessler

Tue 14 Nov 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Visualisation in biology: much more than pretty pictures

Dr. Monica Zoppe

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Tue 14 Nov 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

Richard Doll Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Richard Doll Seminar: Large-scale epidemiology in South Korea: findings from 1.5 million adults

Professor Sun Ha Jee

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Natasha Bowyer

Wed 15 Nov 2017 from 11:00 to 12:00

WTCHG Seminars

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Seminar Room A, Headington OX3 7BN

High-throughput sequencing reveals insights into the relationships between B-cell antibody repertoire, phenotype and function in health, cancer and autoimmune disease

Dr Rachael Bashford-Rogers

The adaptive immune response selectively expands B and T-cell clones following antigen recognition by the B- or T-cell receptors (BCR and TCR) respectively. BCRs are the membrane-bound form of antibodies and are generated through DNA recombination, with potential to recognise a vast array of... Read more

The adaptive immune response selectively expands B and T-cell clones following antigen recognition by the B- or T-cell receptors (BCR and TCR) respectively. BCRs are the membrane-bound form of antibodies and are generated through DNA recombination, with potential to recognise a vast array of pathogens. Currently, little is known about the interplay between B-cell differentiation, BCR somatic hypermutation, class switching, and antigen specificity in health and disease. Here we describe novel methods to characterise the human adaptive immune response by high-throughput sequencing of B-cell receptor antigen-binding regions and antibody class (isotype), which can be used to quantify multiple aspects of B-cell immune status from single blood samples. Using these methods, we demonstrate for the first time, the relationships between B-cell differentiation, diversification through somatic hypermutation, and changes in function through isotype usages. We provide a comprehensive analysis of how distinct B-cell populations contribute to total peripheral blood, and how these can be used to infer the immune B-cell status of an individual. We demonstrate how B-cell receptor repertoire sequencing can be used to understand B-cell population changes in a range of autoimmune diseases and leukeamia, giving unique insights into B-cell pathology. We further demonstrate the effect of different therapies on B-cell populations, including analysis of B-cell reconstitution after immunosuppression, and the nature of persistent B-cell clones. These methods enable tracking of pathogenic B-cell clones in serial patient samples with unprecedented sensitivity, and allow for phylogenetic reconstruction of the clonal history of these B-cell clones, thus giving insights into the mechanisms of clonal diversification and disease relapse. These findings give a unique perspective into the clonal dynamics and function of B-cells in health and disease, and provides an exciting platform for understanding the impact of different immuno-modulatory treatments.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Isabel Schmidt

Wed 15 Nov 2017 from 11:00 to 12:30

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Ethox Seminar - The role of male partners in women’s decisions to use PrEP during pregnancy

: Implementation of PrEP in pregnancy has potential to avert HIV infections in HIV-exposed pregnant women. However, during the transition from clinical trials to implementation questions remain about drug safety during pregnancy and social and cultural acceptability. In many countries with a high... Read more

: Implementation of PrEP in pregnancy has potential to avert HIV infections in HIV-exposed pregnant women. However, during the transition from clinical trials to implementation questions remain about drug safety during pregnancy and social and cultural acceptability. In many countries with a high HIV burden, men play an important role in the health decisions of their female partners, particularly during pregnancy. Understanding men and women’s perspectives on the role of partners when considering prevention decisions for use of PrEP has important practical and ethical implications for designing implementation programs and moving to clinical use. We conducted a qualitative study linked to the PrEP Demonstration Project in Kenya, relying on focus groups and individual interviews with women, partners, and clinicians to characterize the social, biologic, and ethical considerations surrounding treatment decisions during pregnancy for investigational interventions, focusing particularly on experiences surrounding PrEP use. Here we report the findings related to the role of partners in decision-making during pregnancy. Overall, our study found that both women and men in this socio-cultural context viewed the role of male partners as important but varied on the reasons and degree of involvement. Women’s views about the need to involve male partners in investigational prevention decisions during pregnancy varied, ranging from pragmatic deference to partners, willing shared decision-making, to strong views about a woman’s right to make independent decisions. Whereas most men believed that they should be consulted before women participate in biomedical research during pregnancy–with a few male partners taking the strong position that their female partners should not participate without the husband’s direct consent to have her participate. These findings raised challenging ethical questions about how to reconcile respect for women’s autonomy while planning implementation programs that are culturally sensitive. Reflecting on this data, we consider ways to reconcile ethical requirements for individual consent of pregnant women in treatment or research decisions with sociocultural norms that ranged from strongly paternalistic to supporting shared decision-making between partners. Understanding and addressing partner concerns and clarifying the role of partners in decisions to participate in implementation of new interventions during pregnancy are important factors for expanding the interventions available to women during pregnancy.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Wed 15 Nov 2017 from 12:00 to 13:00

Peter Medawar Building Seminars

Medawar Building, Level 30 Seminar Room, off South Parks Road OX1 3SY

Can kissing give you tuberculosis?

Helen A Fletcher

An exploration of immune correlates of risk of developing TB disease in infants in the Western Cape of South Africa.

An exploration of immune correlates of risk of developing TB disease in infants in the Western Cape of South Africa.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Prof Lynn Dustin

Please arrive 5 minutes early for building access

Wed 15 Nov 2017 from 13:30 to 14:30

MRC HIU Wednesday Seminar Series

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Catch me if you can – illuminating the onset of adaptive immunity

Professor Robert Tampé

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Wed 15 Nov 2017 from 15:00 to 16:00

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

Gibson Building, Meeting room 3, Woodstock Road OX2 6HE

"Does choice and competition in public services improve the performance of non-altruistic providers, but worsen the performance of altruistic providers?"

Dr Matthew Skellern, Tom O'Keeffe

In an influential application of David Hume’s famous proposition that “in contriving any system of government, every man ought to be supposed a knave”, Julian Le Grand argues that providing public services using markets, choice and competition can help to align the behaviour of ‘knavish’... Read more

In an influential application of David Hume’s famous proposition that “in contriving any system of government, every man ought to be supposed a knave”, Julian Le Grand argues that providing public services using markets, choice and competition can help to align the behaviour of ‘knavish’ (e.g. self-interested, lazy, avaricious, time-serving) providers with that of ‘knightly’ (e.g. altruistic, public-service-motivated) ones. Studying the English National Health Service (NHS) during the 2000s, we provide evidence that, while competition can indeed improve the behaviour of ‘knaves’, it may worsen the behaviour of ‘knights’. We obtain this evidence by estimating the effect of a major competition-promoting reform in which patients were allowed to choose which hospital they attended for elective surgery, on clinical quality as captured by mortality from acute myocardial infarction, using measures of hospital-level altruism drawn from the NHS Staff Survey. Our estimates indicate that non-altruistic hospitals responded to competition by improving care quality, but that the response of altruistic hospitals was attenuated and – more tentatively – perhaps even negative. These findings are consistent with predictions from economic theory that, when prices are fixed, hospital competition will lead to care quality improvements when hospitals are not altruistic, but will have more ambiguous effects – including possibly negative effects – on altruistic hospitals. We conclude by discussing implications for future public service reform efforts.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Catia Nicodemo

Wed 15 Nov 2017 from 16:00 to 17:00

OPDC Seminar Series (DPAG)

Sherrington Building, Sherrington Library, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Biomarkers in Parkinson’s disease

Dr Brit Mollenhauer

Brit Mollenhauer is an Assistant Professor and movement disorder specialist with specialty training in neurochemistry. She is an expert in biomarkers for PD, including assay development and validation with focus on α-synuclein and other proteins. She is a member of executive steering committee of... Read more

Brit Mollenhauer is an Assistant Professor and movement disorder specialist with specialty training in neurochemistry. She is an expert in biomarkers for PD, including assay development and validation with focus on α-synuclein and other proteins. She is a member of executive steering committee of the Parkinson Progression Marker Initiative (PPMI) study (MJFF) and co-chair of the bioanalytics core of PPMI.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Melanie Witt

Thu 16 Nov 2017 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, TDI, Basement meeting room, NDM Research Building, Headington OX3 7FZ

Host Proteostasis Modulates RNA Virus Evolution

Matthew Shoulders

Predicting and constraining RNA virus evolution require understanding the molecular factors that define the mutational landscapes accessible to these pathogens. RNA viruses typically have high mutation rates, resulting in frequent production of protein variants with compromised biophysical... Read more

Predicting and constraining RNA virus evolution require understanding the molecular factors that define the mutational landscapes accessible to these pathogens. RNA viruses typically have high mutation rates, resulting in frequent production of protein variants with compromised biophysical properties. Viral evolution is necessarily constrained by the consequent challenge to protein folding and function. It follows that host proteostasis mechanisms hijacked by viruses could be significant determinants of the fitness of viral protein variants, serving as a critical force shaping viral evolution. I will discuss a series of experiments designed to test this possibility by integrating chemical tools to regulate host proteostasis with both quantitative and qualitative strategies to assess the consequences for influenza and HIV evolution. Results from these studies are providing new insights into features of host–pathogen interactions that shape viral evolution, and into the potential design of host proteostasis-targeted antiviral therapeutics that are refractory to resistance.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Christina Woodward

Thu 16 Nov 2017 from 12:00 to 13:00

BDI seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar Room 0, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

BDI Seminar: Using big genetic data to understand disease – beyond the next GWAS”

Professor Tim Frayling

The availability of very large open access human phenotype, electronic medical record and genotype resources is changing the way we can do research. Instead of focusing on a particular problem and gathering data to address that problem, we can now ask “what problems can we address given we have... Read more

The availability of very large open access human phenotype, electronic medical record and genotype resources is changing the way we can do research. Instead of focusing on a particular problem and gathering data to address that problem, we can now ask “what problems can we address given we have 1000s of datapoints in 100,000s of people?” I will present some examples of our recent use of UK Biobank and other big human genetic resources to test hypotheses about genetic variation and mechanisms of disease, with a particular focus on obesity, body fat distribution and related traits. These examples include i) the characterisation of “favourable adiposity” alleles and their potential use to “uncouple” higher body fat from its adverse metabolic consequences; ii) advancing our understanding of gene x lifestyle interactions that are features of obesity, and iii) characterisation of the phenotypes associated with genetic variation, unbiased by any clinical selection, including X chromosome aneuploidy.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Thu 16 Nov 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Tropical Medicine Day

Dr Mark Campbell, Prof Brian Angus

Tropical Medicine: "Triple Tropical Trouble", Dr Mark Campbell — Tropical Medicine: "An unusual cause of hoarseness in a heavy smoker", Prof Brian Angus — Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Tropical Medicine: "Triple Tropical Trouble", Dr Mark Campbell — Tropical Medicine: "An unusual cause of hoarseness in a heavy smoker", Prof Brian Angus — Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Audience: Public

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Fri 17 Nov 2017 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Novel approaches to the treatment of prostate cancer

Dr Richard Bryant

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 17 Nov 2017 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Dendritic cell migration in the lymphatics – new insights into biology and mechanisms

Dr Louise Johnson

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 17 Nov 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, DPAG, Sherrington Library, Sherrington Building, off South Parks and Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PT - 01865 272500, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

INT'L GUEST SPEAKER: Professor Linda R. Peterson MD, Washington University School of Medicine, ‘"Beeting" disability in heart failure: nitrate metabolism and muscle function’

Professor Linda Peterson Linda R. Peterson, MD, FAHA, FACC, FASE

Dr. Peterson has earned top honors throughout her academic education. She was valedictorian of her class in high school in Appleton, Wisconsin. At Georgetown University, she graduated magna cum laude and was awarded the Frances Graham medal for academic and athletic achievement. She attended... Read more

Dr. Peterson has earned top honors throughout her academic education. She was valedictorian of her class in high school in Appleton, Wisconsin. At Georgetown University, she graduated magna cum laude and was awarded the Frances Graham medal for academic and athletic achievement. She attended Washington University School of Medicine and pursued training in Internal Medicine and Cardiology at Barnes Hospital. As a resident, she won the poster contest at both the state and national level of the American College of Physicians competition for her presentation on Ehrlichiosis, a new disease at the time. She also won the Knowlton Incentive for Excellence, which honors resident physicians “who have demonstrated the ability to balance exceptional, compassionate care with a commitment to being leaders in the science of internal medicine.” Dr. Peterson’s translational research has altered our understanding of the human heart – its metabolism, structure, and function – both in health and disease. Her earliest contribution to science refined our understanding of the prognostic value of exercise peak VO2 testing in heart failure. One of her papers in the Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation, helped to set the new cut-points that are currently used to aid clinicians better determine the timing of cardiac transplantation in patients with heart failure. Her later research on the effects of obesity and diabetes on the heart produced some of the seminal papers in the field. Two of her publications, in Circulation and the Journal of the American College of Cardiology are citation classics with over 100 citations each. These papers defined obesity’s detrimental effects on myocardial metabolism, structure, and function in the human heart. Because of inherent connections among metabolism, structure, and function, Dr. Peterson’s research has highlighted possible targets for treatment of obesity-related heart failure. She has further defined the effect of weight loss on the human heart, and it is this research published in Obesity, which has pointed to one of the likely metabolic mechanisms of obesity-related cardiac dysfunction – excessive oxygen consumption and probable reactive oxygen species production. In the process of her research on obesity, she was the first to note and publish on the major effects of sex on myocardial metabolism in health and disease using positron emission tomography. In her latest work, she showed that dietary nitrate improves skeletal muscle function – muscle speed of contraction, muscle power, and aerobic capacity – as well as decreasing work of breathing in patients with heart failure. The paper in Circulation: Heart Failure describing these effects and her similar findings in normal subjects was featured in an interview by National Public Radio and subsequently picked up by the lay press in many countries around the globe. She is now working to expand these findings to a multi-center randomized clinical trial. Lastly, in collaboration with Jean Schaffer and Dan Ory and investigators at the Framingham Heart Study, she has patented a novel test for specific lipidomic markers as predictors of cardiovascular disease, coronary heart disease, and heart failure, and overall mortality (even after accounting for currently known cardiovascular risk factors). These lipidomic species may not only be a biomarker of disease and portents of outcomes, but some data suggest that they may be involved in the pathogenesis of heart disease. This work is currently under review at the Eur Heart J. In addition to her achievements in research, Dr. Peterson is also an outstanding mentor and teacher. As a resident, she won the Barnes Hospital resident teaching award. She has given didactic cardiology lectures to medical students and fellows at Washington U.. Linda has also given several Medical Grand Rounds at Washington University and Cardiovascular Research Conference lectures that are very well-received. She is a sought-after lecturer in the U.S. and abroad, having given a plenary lecture at the AHA, several grand rounds at distinguished universities such as Cornell University and the University of Utah, and research symposia at Oxford University in the U.K., and the University of Tromsø. Current Research Interests • Nutritional treatments for myocardial and skeletal muscle • Lipidomics • Effects of obesity and diabetes on cardiac metabolism, structure, and function • Insulin resistance

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sarah Noujaim

Mon 20 Nov 2017 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Stromal cell niches in secondary lymphoid organs: how they develop and function in adaptive immunity

Dr Sanjiv Luther

Sanjiv Luther studied cell biology at the ETH in Zürich. He received his PhD in 1996 from the University of Lausanne for his work on anti-viral immune responses in the laboratory of Hans Acha-Orbea. He then moved to the laboratory of Jason Cyster at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute of the... Read more

Sanjiv Luther studied cell biology at the ETH in Zürich. He received his PhD in 1996 from the University of Lausanne for his work on anti-viral immune responses in the laboratory of Hans Acha-Orbea. He then moved to the laboratory of Jason Cyster at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute of the University of California San Francisco where he investigated the role of chemotactic factors in lymphoid tissue development and function. In 2003 he joined the Department of Biochemistry of the University of Lausanne as Assistant Professor funded by a career-development award from the Swiss National Science Foundation. Since 2009 he is Associate Professor there. His current research focuses on the characterization of fibroblastic stromal cells found within secondary lymphoid organs and sites of chronic inflammation, using modern mouse genetics.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Laura Sánchez Lazo

Mon 20 Nov 2017 from 12:00 to 13:00

CNCB Seminar Series

Oxford Martin School, 34 Broad Street OX1 3BD

Hippocampal Dynamics and Memory Processing

Thanos Siapas

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Fiona Woods

Tue 21 Nov 2017 from 10:30 to 11:30

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

NPEU Seminar - Midwifery Science in the Netherlands; looking for evidence in turbulent times

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Manisha Nair

Tue 21 Nov 2017 from 11:00 to 12:30

Population Health Seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar Room 0, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Tue 21 Nov 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Forward programming and gene editing: the tools for making blood cells with added clinical benefit

Dr Cedric Ghevaert

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Tue 21 Nov 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

Richard Doll Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

* CANCELLED * Richard Doll Seminar: Understanding multiple risk behaviour in adolescence

Professor Rona Campbell

Audience: Members of the University only

Wed 22 Nov 2017 from 12:00 to 13:00

Peter Medawar Building Seminars

Medawar Building, Please arrive 5 minutes early for access to the building, off South Parks Road OX1 3SY

Towards a real-time genomic surveillance of arboviruses in the Americas

Nuno Faria

My research focuses on investigating the patterns of gene flow in pathogen populations. I am particularly interested in phylogenetic methods of sequence analysis that combine genetic, spatial and ecological information. Specific questions involve (i) uncovering the spatiotemporal dynamics of human... Read more

My research focuses on investigating the patterns of gene flow in pathogen populations. I am particularly interested in phylogenetic methods of sequence analysis that combine genetic, spatial and ecological information. Specific questions involve (i) uncovering the spatiotemporal dynamics of human and animal pathogens, (ii) identifying factors underlying pathogen spread and dynamics at different scales (e.g. geographic regions, body compartments) and (iii) investigating the drivers of cross-species transmission and host shifts.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Prof Lynn Dustin

Wed 22 Nov 2017 from 15:00 to 16:00

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

St Luke's Chapel, Woodstock Road OX2 6GG

Behavioural drivers of obesity in Malaysia

Geeta Appannah

Audience: Members of the University only

Wed 22 Nov 2017 from 16:00 to 17:00

BDI seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar rooms, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

BDI Inaugural Lecture: The Nature of Nurture

Augustine Kong

Using logical reasoning, mathematical modelling, and empirical data, we demonstrate that there is a genetic component to nurture. Recognising this effect will not only affect how we think about the question of Nature versus Nurture, there are implications for many areas of quantitative genetics.... Read more

Using logical reasoning, mathematical modelling, and empirical data, we demonstrate that there is a genetic component to nurture. Recognising this effect will not only affect how we think about the question of Nature versus Nurture, there are implications for many areas of quantitative genetics. Topics touched on Include the interpretation of GWAS results, parent-of-origin effects, pleiotropy, nurture from siblings, heritability, and selection and evolution.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Thu 23 Nov 2017 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, TDI, Basement meeting room, NDM Research Building, Headington OX3 7FZ

Targeting cancer therapy using oncolytic viruses

Prof Len Seymour

Oncolytic adenoviruses replicate and amplify themselves within tumour cells, mediating targeted cytotoxicity as well as allowing tumour-selective expression of encoded biologics such as cytokines or checkpoint inhibitor antibodies, for secretion into the tumour microenvironment. We have developed... Read more

Oncolytic adenoviruses replicate and amplify themselves within tumour cells, mediating targeted cytotoxicity as well as allowing tumour-selective expression of encoded biologics such as cytokines or checkpoint inhibitor antibodies, for secretion into the tumour microenvironment. We have developed adenoviruses suitable for i.v. delivery to disseminated disease in humans, and are now ‘arming’ them to express bispecific T cell engagers (BiTEs) capable of activating endogenous T cells to attack endogenous tumour cells. This new generation of viruses can combine targeted cytotoxicity, local reversal of immune suppression and intratumoural activation of T cells to give a combined therapeutic effect that can be rapidly translated into the clinic.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Christina Woodward

Thu 23 Nov 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Medical Director's Office / Radiology

Dr Katie Jeffery, Dr Tony Berendt, Prof Fergus Gleeson

Medical Director's Office: "Rx: a Large Dose of Humble Pie", Dr Tony Berendt and Dr Katie Jeffery -- Radiology: "Quality control in Medicine/Radiology. Why don’t we measure it?", Prof Fergus Gleeson -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Medical Director's Office: "Rx: a Large Dose of Humble Pie", Dr Tony Berendt and Dr Katie Jeffery -- Radiology: "Quality control in Medicine/Radiology. Why don’t we measure it?", Prof Fergus Gleeson -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Audience: Public

Fri 24 Nov 2017 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

How to ask the right questions

Professor Wytske Fokkens

'How to ask the right questions' will be a talk about the journey of learning to do research and asking yourself the right questions. Wytske J. Fokkens is Professor at the Department of Otorhinolaryngology at the Academic Medical Center in Amsterdam. Her main field of interest is sinus/skullbase... Read more

'How to ask the right questions' will be a talk about the journey of learning to do research and asking yourself the right questions. Wytske J. Fokkens is Professor at the Department of Otorhinolaryngology at the Academic Medical Center in Amsterdam. Her main field of interest is sinus/skullbase surgery and mucosal pathology of the upper and lower airways. She is the secretary general of the ERS. She is the Chairman of the European Position Paper on Rhinosinusitis and Nasal Polyps (EPOS). Dr. Fokkens is a member of the executive committee of ARIA, and workpackage and center leader of GA2LEN, the EU network of excellence. She is the author of more than 350 papers on rhinology and allergy that have been published in peer-reviewed journals. She has written a textbook on Rhinology: Rhinology and Skull Base Surgery, From the Lab to the Operating Room – An Evidence Based Approach, (Thieme ). Since 15 years she organizes an advanced sinus surgery course. She serves as Editor in chief of Rhinology and Associate Editor of Allergy and Clinical Respiratory Journal. Recently she received the EAACI Paul Ehrlich award for improving experimental research. She is honorary member of EAACI, the Spanish and Roumanian Rhinologic Society. She is married and has three children.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 24 Nov 2017 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

The unfolding story of HLA-E (G.Gillespie/L.Walters) & Showing restraint: NK cell regulation of HIV-1 broadly neutralising antibody induction (I.Pedroza-Pacheco)

Dr Geraldine Gillespie, Lucy Walters, Dr Isabela Pedroza-Pacheco

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 24 Nov 2017 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, Basement seminar room, TDI, Headington OX3 7FZ

Dynamic network models complement machine learning to improve cancer treatment

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Christina Woodward

Fri 24 Nov 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, DPAG, Large Lecture Theatre, Sherrington Building, off South Parks and Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PT - 01865 272500, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

INT'L GUEST SPEAKER - Professor Thomas Braun MD, Director, Max Planck Inst for Heart & Lung Research : ‘Pathways controlling cardiac morphogenesis and skeletal muscle regeneration’

Professor Thomas Braun, Director at the Max-Planck-Institute for Heart and Lung Reseach

Thomas Braun, Max-Planck-Institute for Heart and Lung Research. Ludwigstr. 43, 61231 Bad Nauheim, Germany Congenital heart disease (CHD) represents the most prevalent inborn anomaly. Only a minority of CHD cases is attributed to genetic causes, suggesting a major role of environmental factors.... Read more

Thomas Braun, Max-Planck-Institute for Heart and Lung Research. Ludwigstr. 43, 61231 Bad Nauheim, Germany Congenital heart disease (CHD) represents the most prevalent inborn anomaly. Only a minority of CHD cases is attributed to genetic causes, suggesting a major role of environmental factors. Nonphysiological hypoxia during early pregnancy induces CHD, but the underlying reasons are unknown. We found that cells in the mouse heart tube are hypoxic, while cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs) expressing ISL1 in the secondary heart field are normoxic. In ISL1+ CPCs, induction of hypoxic responses caused CHD by repressing Isl1 and activating Nkx2.5, resulting in decreased cell proliferation and enhanced cardiomyocyte specification leading to CHD. Mechanistically, hypoxia-induced arrest of Isl1+ CPC proliferation is due to complex formation of HIF1α with the Notch effector HES1 and the protein deacetylase SIRT1 at the Isl1 gene. Our results indicate that spatial differences in oxygenation of the developing heart serve as signals to control CPC expansion and cardiac morphogenesis. We propose that physiological hypoxia coordinates homeostasis of CPCs, providing mechanistic explanations for some nongenetic causes of CHD. Cardiomyocytes in the adult heart show a decline of differentiated functions and acquisition of immature, “embryonic” properties under various disease processes, which seems to protect cells from hypoxia by reduction of ATP consumption. Cardiomyocyte dedifferentiation in mice depends on the OSM receptor leading to the release of multiple cytokines including Reg3b, which is required for efficient homing of macrophages to the damaged myocardium. In a search for posttranscriptional regulatory processes controlling cardiomyocyte dedifferentiation, we identified miRNAs that suppress the FGFR and OSMR pathways, which are instrumental for the control of postnatal cardiomyocyte proliferation and dedifferentiation. In contrast to the heart muscle, skeletal muscles contain dedicated stem cells enabling muscle regeneration throughout adult life. We have conducted a large high-resolution mass spectrometry-based analysis of proteins expressed in satellite cells combined with a non-biased high-throughput lentiviral RNAi screen to analyze the function of chromatin-modifying enzymes in muscle stem cells. We discovered that skeletal muscle stem cells primarily carry facultative heterochromatin, which, after differentiation of satellite cells to myofibers, switches to a combination of euchromatin and constitutive heterochromatin. Inactivation of the chromatin modifier Suv4-20h1 in muscle stem cells results in widespread chromatin rearrangements and loss of PCR-dependent H3K27me3 modifications, which causes relocation of the MyoD locus from the nuclear periphery and precocious MyoD expression. Other epigenetic modifiers repress expression of components of the necroptosis pathway in muscle stem cells. Reduced expression of such modifiers under inflammatory conditions increases necroptosis of muscle stem cells and compromises skeletal muscle regeneration.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sarah Noujaim

Fri 24 Nov 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

NDM Seminar Series

Henry Wellcome Building of Cellular and Molecular Physiology, Seminar Rooms A&B, Roosevelt Drive OX3 7BN

Resistant Malaria & Hypoxia, HIF-2 and the Carotid Body

Professor Nicholas J White, Dr Tammie Bishop

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Kathryn Smith

Fri 24 Nov 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM Science Career Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Chopping and changing: from microtome to drug hunter

Dr. Adrian Moore

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Alice Mayer

Fri 24 Nov 2017 from 17:00 to 18:00

AfOx insaka - a gathering for sharing ideas and knowledge about Africa-focused research

Oxford Martin School, 34 Broad Street OX1 3BD

AfOx insaka - a gathering for sharing ideas and knowledge about Africa-focused research

Simukai Chigudu, Ana Namburete

The AfOx insaka is a gathering for sharing ideas and knowledge about Africa-focused research with speakers from diverse and varied academic disciplines. This insaka features Dr Ana Namburete whose talk is titled 'Beyond the Cranial Vault: Imaging the Fetal Brain using Ultrasound' and Dr Simukai Chigudu who will speak on ‘The Politics of Cholera, Crisis and Citizenship in Zimbabwe’

The AfOx insaka is a gathering for sharing ideas and knowledge about Africa-focused research with speakers from diverse and varied academic disciplines. This insaka features Dr Ana Namburete whose talk is titled 'Beyond the Cranial Vault: Imaging the Fetal Brain using Ultrasound' and Dr Simukai Chigudu who will speak on ‘The Politics of Cholera, Crisis and Citizenship in Zimbabwe’

Booking Required

Audience: Public

Organisers: Africa Oxford Initiative

Mon 27 Nov 2017 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Chondrocytes and snoRNAs: lost in translation?

Dr Mandy Peffers

Mandy Peffers undertook a degree in Animal Science at the University of Leeds, followed by a veterinary degree at The Royal Veterinary College, qualifying as a veterinarian in 1995. She then spent 11 years in industry, private practice and having a family before returning to academia to undertake a... Read more

Mandy Peffers undertook a degree in Animal Science at the University of Leeds, followed by a veterinary degree at The Royal Veterinary College, qualifying as a veterinarian in 1995. She then spent 11 years in industry, private practice and having a family before returning to academia to undertake a PhD entitled ‘Proteomic and transcriptomic signatures of cartilage ageing and disease’ in 2013. Further Wellcome Trust supported PDRA was on ‘A Systems Biology Approach to Musculoskeletal Ageing’ for which she was awarded a Fellowship of the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons. She is currently a Wellcome Trust Clinical Intermediate Fellow studying ‘The role of small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs) in cartilage ageing and disease’. Her particular research interests include the role of non-coding RNAs in cartilage ageing and osteoarthritis, understanding the pathogenesis of tendinopathy and identification of biomarkers for osteoarthritis. She is based at the University of Liverpool in the Institute of Ageing and Chronic Disease were her small group which currently includes four PhD students.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Laura Sánchez Lazo

Tue 28 Nov 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Mechanisms behind mammalian early embryogenesis in vitro and in vivo

Prof Magdalena Zernicka-Goetz

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

SEMINAR POSTPONED TO THE NEW YEAR DUE TO ILLNESS

Tue 28 Nov 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

Richard Doll Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Wed 29 Nov 2017 from 11:00 to 12:30

Population Health Seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar Room 0, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Ethox seminar - Consenting conundrums in adolescent mental health

Mina Fazel

Booking Required

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Wed 29 Nov 2017 from 12:00 to 13:00

Strubi seminars

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Meeting rooms A & B, Headington OX3 7BN

Structure-assisted Design of Universal Vaccines and Therapeutics against Influenza Virus

Dr Ian Wilson

Influenza virus remains a constant threat to global health. The 1918 H1N1 pandemic caused around 50 million deaths worldwide and up to 30-50% mortality has been reported for recent emerging viruses, such as H5N1 and H7N9, in those hospitalized. Therefore, there is an urgent need to design a much... Read more

Influenza virus remains a constant threat to global health. The 1918 H1N1 pandemic caused around 50 million deaths worldwide and up to 30-50% mortality has been reported for recent emerging viruses, such as H5N1 and H7N9, in those hospitalized. Therefore, there is an urgent need to design a much more effective vaccine to protect against the multiple subtypes and types of influenza virus. Until relatively recently, it was thought that antibodies to influenza virus were strain-specific and could protect only against highly related strains within the same subtype. However, since 2008, many potent human antibodies have been isolated that target the hemagglutinin glycoprotein (HA) and are much broader in their neutralization of influenza virus. We have determined crystal structures of a number of these broadly neutralizing human antibodies (bnAbs) and have shown that they bind to the highly conserved functional sites on the HA: the stem (fusion domain) and the receptor binding site. We have also determined structures of small proteins, peptides and small molecules that also bind to functional sites on the HA. Thus, structural and functional characterization of these bnAbs with the HA have provided exciting new opportunities for design of novel vaccines and therapeutics that afford greater protection against influenza virus.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Agata Krupa

Wed 29 Nov 2017 from 12:00 to 13:00

Peter Medawar Building Seminars

Medawar Building, Please arrive 5 minutes for access to the Building, off South Parks Road OX1 3SY

Antibiotic footprint - Do we need it?

Direk Limmathurotsakul

The seminar will highlight what is happening in South East Asia to tackle AMR. Direk will challenge how we understand 'antibiotic free' labels on retail meat packs and discuss better ways of communicating our human 'antibiotic footprint'.

The seminar will highlight what is happening in South East Asia to tackle AMR. Direk will challenge how we understand 'antibiotic free' labels on retail meat packs and discuss better ways of communicating our human 'antibiotic footprint'.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Andrea Kastner

Wed 29 Nov 2017 from 16:00 to 17:00

SGC Seminars

NDM Building, TDI seminar room, Headington OX3 7FZ

Global Biochemical Profiling for Problem Solving in Biology and Disease

Saul H. Rosenberg, PhD.

The BCL-2 family proteins are central regulators of cell death. Anti-apoptotic members (e.g. BCL-2, BCL-XL, MCL-1) contribute to tumor initiation, disease progression and drug resistance. While these proteins represent attractive drug targets for anticancer therapy, antagonism of their function... Read more

The BCL-2 family proteins are central regulators of cell death. Anti-apoptotic members (e.g. BCL-2, BCL-XL, MCL-1) contribute to tumor initiation, disease progression and drug resistance. While these proteins represent attractive drug targets for anticancer therapy, antagonism of their function requires disruption of large surface area protein-protein interactions. We have used nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based screening, parallel synthesis and structure-based design to develop small molecules that bind with high affinity to multiple anti-apoptotic BCL-2 family proteins including BCL-XL and BCL-2. The 1st-generation dual BCL-2/BCL-XL inhibitor navitoclax exhibited single-agent activity in patients with relapsed or refractory CLL. Platelets, however, are dependent on BCL-XL for survival and as predicted by preclinical data, clinical inhibition of BCL-XL by navitoclax induced a rapid, concentration-dependent and dose-limiting decrease in circulating platelets. Therefore, we re-engineered navitoclax using structure-guided rational design to create the highly potent, orally bioavailable and BCL-2–selective inhibitor venetoclax (ABT-199), which has recently been approved for the treatment of patients with high-risk relapsed-refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Bio: Saul Rosenberg is Senior Director of Oncology Discovery at AbbVie. He received his BS degree from MIT and then moved to the University of California at Berkeley where he earned a Ph.D. degree in organic chemistry in the laboratories of Professor Henry Rapoport. He began his career at Abbott (which became AbbVie in 2013) in the area of Cardiovascular Research where he discovered the renin inhibitor zankiren. He subsequently moved to the Oncology area and currently holds the title of Senior Director. In this capacity, he has overseen the advancement of multiple compounds to the status of clinical candidate, including the Bcl-2 family inhibitors navitoclax and venetoclax and the PARP inhibitor veliparib. He has authored more than 130 publications, is an inventor on 25 U.S. patents and has been invited speak at numerous venues. His current research efforts are focused on the areas of apoptosis, epigenetics and cell cycle regulation.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Natsumi Astley

Wed 29 Nov 2017 from 18:00 to 19:15

Mathematical Institute, Lecture Theatre 2, Woodstock Road OX2 6GG

Ann McPherson Memorial Lecture 2017

Clare Marx

Miss Clare Marx, has just finished a 3-year term as President of the Royal College of Surgeons of England, the first woman to have held the post in their 207 year history. During that time she was credited with changing the culture of the organisation to concentrate on a focus of excellence in... Read more

Miss Clare Marx, has just finished a 3-year term as President of the Royal College of Surgeons of England, the first woman to have held the post in their 207 year history. During that time she was credited with changing the culture of the organisation to concentrate on a focus of excellence in patient care, even when that meant challenging the profession to change. Both internally and externally she championed and encouraged clinical leadership, in particular the need for women to step into such roles. The world of medicine has changed slowly for women in the profession and there remain challenges to overcome. Clare Marx’s lecture will explore this history with a focus on institutional and personal challenges.

Booking Required

Audience: Public

Organisers: Ruth Loseby

Thu 30 Nov 2017 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, TDI, Basement meeting room, NDM Research Building, Headington OX3 7FZ

Understanding infection and pathogenesis from the epithelial point of view

Dr Francesco Boccellato

The forefront of the gastrointestinal mucosa consists mainly of a continuous polarized epithelial monolayer, protected by mucus. This strong defense barrier can be colonized by pathogens that trigger acute and chronic inflammation. This exceptional colonization ability is associated with an... Read more

The forefront of the gastrointestinal mucosa consists mainly of a continuous polarized epithelial monolayer, protected by mucus. This strong defense barrier can be colonized by pathogens that trigger acute and chronic inflammation. This exceptional colonization ability is associated with an increased risk of developing adenocarcinomas at the sites of infection. Indeed epidemiological studies have described a strong correlation between the chronic infection with Helicobacter pylori and gastric cancer as well as a correlation between Salmonella enterica carriage and the onset of gallbladder cancer. Considering the epithelium as center court for infection, inflammation and cancer we have regenerated the epithelial monolayers of the gallbladder and of the human gastric mucosa in vitro. The infection of these human primary cell models reveals novel insight into bacterial induced host genotoxicity, inflammation and epithelial defence mechanisms.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Christina Woodward

Thu 30 Nov 2017 from 12:30 to 13:30

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

“Molecular Regulation and Function of GATA2 in the Programming of Haemogenic Endothelium”

Tomasz Dobrzycki

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sarah Butler

VIVA SEMINAR

Thu 30 Nov 2017 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Acute General Medicine Firm A / Silver Star

Dr Aparna Pal, Dr Meena Bhatia, Dr Charlotte Frise, Dr Lucy Mackillop

Acute General Medicine Firm A: "Psychotic fatigue", Dr Aparna Pal -- Silver Star: "Pregnancy: should this be viewed as a vascular risk factor?", Dr Meena Bhatia, Dr Charlotte Frise and Dr Lucy Mackillop -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Acute General Medicine Firm A: "Psychotic fatigue", Dr Aparna Pal -- Silver Star: "Pregnancy: should this be viewed as a vascular risk factor?", Dr Meena Bhatia, Dr Charlotte Frise and Dr Lucy Mackillop -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Audience: Public

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Thu 30 Nov 2017 from 14:30 to 15:30

MRC HIU Wednesday Seminar Series

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Discovery of Novel and Misfit Lipids that Control Human Macrophage Activation and T cell Response

Professor Branch Moody

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer