Seminars

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Thu 1 Feb 2018 from 10:30 to 11:30

Strubi seminars

Democratising live-cell high-speed super-resolution microscopy

Dr Ricardo Henriques

The extension of PALM and STORM based methods to live-cell dynamics is limited due to their reliance on intense phototoxic illumination and long acquisition times. In this talk I will describe a new approach, Super-Resolution Radial Fluctuations (SRRF), capable of achieving super-resolution with... Read more

The extension of PALM and STORM based methods to live-cell dynamics is limited due to their reliance on intense phototoxic illumination and long acquisition times. In this talk I will describe a new approach, Super-Resolution Radial Fluctuations (SRRF), capable of achieving super-resolution with illumination orders of magnitude lower than methods such as SMLM or STED. It also enables live-cell imaging with conventional fluorophores using modern widefield, confocal or TIRF microscopes, achieving resolutions better than 150nm at 1 frame per second. Meanwhile, in datasets suitable for SMLM analysis SRRF achieves resolutions matching standard analysis techniques (20nm). We demonstrate, using SRRF, live-cell super-resolution images of microtubule, mitochondrial dynamics, the dynamic nanoscale reorganisation of HIV-1 host receptors, as well as extensive cortical actin remodelling during the formation of the immunological T-cell synapse.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Agata Krupa

Thu 1 Feb 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Horton Hospital / Rheumatology

Dr Nikant Sabharwal, Prof Paul Wordsworth

Horton Hospital: "Bleeding hell", Dr Nikant Sabharwal -- Rheumatology: "35 years on: the changing face of metabolic bone disease", Prof Paul Wordsworth -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Horton Hospital: "Bleeding hell", Dr Nikant Sabharwal -- Rheumatology: "35 years on: the changing face of metabolic bone disease", Prof Paul Wordsworth -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Audience: Public

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Thu 1 Feb 2018 from 16:30 to 17:30

Experimental Medicine TGU Seminars

John Radcliffe Hospital - Main Building, GPEC Level 3 Seminar Room 2B, Headington OX3 9DU

Title TBC

Toby Phesse

Toby Phesse, European Cancer Stem Cell Research, Institute, School of Biosciences, Cardiff University

Toby Phesse, European Cancer Stem Cell Research, Institute, School of Biosciences, Cardiff University

Audience: Public

Organisers: Prof Holm Uhlig

Fri 2 Feb 2018 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Undergraduate Medical Curriculum Programme in South Sudan

Mr Hugh Grant

Mr James Turner, a Clinical Research Fellow in Global Surgery at NDORMS, will also talk about surgery in Ethiopia.

Mr James Turner, a Clinical Research Fellow in Global Surgery at NDORMS, will also talk about surgery in Ethiopia.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 2 Feb 2018 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Cytotoxic T cells send death in an envelope’

Dr Stefan Balint

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 2 Feb 2018 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, Basement seminar room, TDI building, Headington OX3 7FZ

A Tale of Two Evils: Aging and Cancer

Dr Curtis Harris

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Christina Woodward

Fri 2 Feb 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, Large Lecture Theatre, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Predatory insects as models to understand fast and accurate sensorimotor transformations in interception tasks

Dr Paloma T. Gonzalez-Bellido

For predatory insects, detecting a fast and small moving target and catching it mid-air is crucial for survival. Such ability is shared with other species, think for example, an outfielder intercepting the ball during a baseball game. Thus, interception is a task solved by brains of very different... Read more

For predatory insects, detecting a fast and small moving target and catching it mid-air is crucial for survival. Such ability is shared with other species, think for example, an outfielder intercepting the ball during a baseball game. Thus, interception is a task solved by brains of very different complexity. Do all predatory insects share the same flight strategy and underlying neural algorithm, or have individual species found solutions tailored to their eye size, ecosystem type and phylogeny? In this talk I will present work from my laboratory aimed at answering such questions; we are studying the behaviour, sensory performance, eye morphology and neural code of premotor neurons in aerial insect predators.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sally Collins

Fri 2 Feb 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM Occasional Seminars

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

"Is hard work enough to be successful?" A perspective from experiences in Government, Business and Health Care

Millie Banerjee

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sarah Butler

Fri 2 Feb 2018 from 17:00 to 18:30

AfOx insaka - a gathering for sharing ideas and knowledge about Africa-focused research

St Cross College, Lecture Theatre, West Wing, St Giles OX1 3LZ

AfOx insaka - a gathering for sharing ideas and knowledge about Africa-focused research

Professor Wale Adebanwi, Dr. Gladys Kalema-Zikusoka

Prof Wale Adebanwi: ‘The Slum, the City and the State: Social Action and Citizens’ Rights in a Lagos Slum’ Dr. Gladys Kalema-Zikusoka: ‘Can Health investments benefit conservation and sustainable development?’

Prof Wale Adebanwi: ‘The Slum, the City and the State: Social Action and Citizens’ Rights in a Lagos Slum’ Dr. Gladys Kalema-Zikusoka: ‘Can Health investments benefit conservation and sustainable development?’

Booking Required

Audience: Public

Organisers: Africa Oxford Initiative

Mon 5 Feb 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Autoimmunity versus anti-tumour Immunity: the flip sides of CD8 T cell responses

Prof Rose Zamoyska

Activation and termination of immune responses are balanced through cross-talk between tyrosine kinases and phosphatases immediately downstream of the T cell receptor. Changes in expression and point mutations in these molecules, in particular the cytoplasmic phosphatase PTPN22, have been linked to... Read more

Activation and termination of immune responses are balanced through cross-talk between tyrosine kinases and phosphatases immediately downstream of the T cell receptor. Changes in expression and point mutations in these molecules, in particular the cytoplasmic phosphatase PTPN22, have been linked to autoimmunity. We have been asking how these mutations perturb homeostasis and result in a failure of regulation, and at what point do perturbations in the homeostatic balance of the immune system tip into immunopathology and autoimmunity. On the flip side, can we use these mutations to improve responses of T cells, particularly in the context of immunotherapy to cancer? ---- Rose Zamoyska has been Professor of Immune Cell Biology at the University of Edinburgh since 2007. She obtained her PhD from the University of Cambridge and undertook postdoctoral training in Stanford, USA before moving to London where she established her research group first at University College and then as a tenured scientist at the National Institute for Medical Research in Mill Hill. The primary interest of the lab is in T cell signalling and how signals through the T cell receptor influence T cell homeostasis and the ability of T cells to be activated by antigens.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Laura Sánchez Lazo

Mon 5 Feb 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM MONDAY SEMINARS

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Tue 6 Feb 2018 from 10:30 to 11:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

St Luke's Chapel, Woodstock Road OX2 6GG

Smart glasses: Assessing a new technology for the visually impaired using qualitative methods

Dr Anne Ferrey, Iain Wilson

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Jenny Hirst

Tue 6 Feb 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

Targeting splicing in myeloid neoplasms - from bench to bedside

Professor David Steensma

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Tue 6 Feb 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Richard Doll Seminar - Lung Cancer CT screening, the UKLS and European experience - time to implement?

John Field has a Personal Clinical Chair in Molecular Oncology at the University of Liverpool and is Director of Research of the Roy Castle Lung Cancer Research Programme. He is the Chief Investigator for the UK Lung Cancer Screening Trial (UKLS). He is a previous recipient of the IASLC Joseph... Read more

John Field has a Personal Clinical Chair in Molecular Oncology at the University of Liverpool and is Director of Research of the Roy Castle Lung Cancer Research Programme. He is the Chief Investigator for the UK Lung Cancer Screening Trial (UKLS). He is a previous recipient of the IASLC Joseph Cullen Award at the World Conference on Lung Cancer in recognition of lifetime scientific achievements in lung cancer prevention research. He is the principle investigator of the Liverpool Lung Project, a molecular- epidemiological study into the early detection of lung cancer, which has now recruited 13,000 participants. The UKLS Trial and the Liverpool Lung Project form part of the National Cancer Research Institute Lung Cancer portfolio. He has contributed to the lung cancer genetic susceptibility ‘Lung Oncoarray’ project and is heavily involved in the identification of molecular markers in lung and head & neck cancers. In this seminar, Professor Field will discuss UKLS, the first lung cancer screening trial to take place in the UK.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Wed 7 Feb 2018 from 11:00 to 12:30

Population Health Seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar Room 0, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Ethox Seminar: Between the reasonable and the particular: Why English law does not, and should not, give primacy to respect for patient autonomy in regulating informed consent to medical treatment

Dr Michael Dunn

The law of informed consent to medical treatment has recently been extensively overhauled in England. The 2015 Montgomery judgement has done away with the long-held position that the information to be disclosed by doctors when obtaining valid consent from patients should be determined on the basis... Read more

The law of informed consent to medical treatment has recently been extensively overhauled in England. The 2015 Montgomery judgement has done away with the long-held position that the information to be disclosed by doctors when obtaining valid consent from patients should be determined on the basis of what a reasonable body of medical opinion agree ought to be disclosed in the circumstances. The UK Supreme Court concluded that the information that is material to a patient’s decision should instead be judged by reference to a new two-limbed test founded on the notions of the ‘reasonable person’ and the ‘particular patient’. The rationale outlined in Montgomery for this new test of materiality, and academic comment on the ruling’s significance, has focused on the central ethical importance that the law now (rightfully) accords to respect for patient autonomy in the process of obtaining consent from patients. In this presentation, I dispute the claim that the new test of materiality articulated in Montgomery equates with respect for autonomy being given primacy in re-shaping the development of the law in this area. I also defend this position, arguing that my revised interpretation of Montgomery’s significance does not equate with a failure by the courts to give due legal consideration to what is owed to patients as autonomous decision-makers in the consent process. Instead, I argue that Montgomery correctly implies that doctors are ethically (and legally) obliged to attend to a number of relevant normative considerations in framing decisions about consent to treatment, which will include subtle interpretations of the values of autonomy and well-being. Doctors should give appropriate consideration to how these values are fleshed out and balanced in context in order to specify precisely what information ought to be disclosed to a patient as a requirement of obtaining consent, and as a core component of shared decision-making within medical encounters more generally. If you would like to attend, please e-mail Jane Beinart at jane.beinart@ethox.ox.ac.uk.

Booking Recommended

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Carol Mulligan-John

Wed 7 Feb 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

Peter Medawar Building Seminars

Medawar Building, Level 30 Seminar Room, off South Parks Road OX1 3SY

Uncovering the dynamics of multi-strain pathogens from serological data

Adam Kucharski

Outbreaks of infections such as influenza can generate a substantial disease burden. However, understanding the dynamics of these infections remains challenging, because individuals can be infected by multiple strains over the course of their lifetime, and infection with one strain may generate a... Read more

Outbreaks of infections such as influenza can generate a substantial disease burden. However, understanding the dynamics of these infections remains challenging, because individuals can be infected by multiple strains over the course of their lifetime, and infection with one strain may generate a cross-reactive immune response to related viruses. I will talk about recent work we've done using mathematical models to estimate unobserved epidemiological and immunological dynamics from contemporary serological data. As well as looking at how these methods can provide insights into influenza outbreaks, I'll discuss broader applications to dengue and related flaviviruses.

Audience: UK Science Community

Organisers: Ramona Kantschuster

Please arrive 5 minutes before the Seminar begins to gain building access

Wed 7 Feb 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Richard Doll Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Richard Doll Seminar - Global surveillance of cancer survival

Dr Claudia Allemani’s background covers the range from applied mathematics to public health and education, via epidemiology and medical statistics. She graduated in mathematics from the University of Turin (Italy) in 1996, then completed a Masters in Statistical and Informatic Methods for data... Read more

Dr Claudia Allemani’s background covers the range from applied mathematics to public health and education, via epidemiology and medical statistics. She graduated in mathematics from the University of Turin (Italy) in 1996, then completed a Masters in Statistical and Informatic Methods for data analysis in the University of Milan (Italy) in 1998, followed by a specializzazione [PhD equivalent] in Medical Statistics in 2001 and a PhD in Public Health and Education in 2006, both in the University of Pavia (Italy). She was elected a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy in July 2012. She became an Honorary Member of the UK Faculty of Public Health (UKFPH) in March 2014. She was awarded the inaugural Global Public Health Award from the UKFPH in June 2016. She obtained a European Research Council Consolidator grant in November 2017 to carry out a world-wide study on inequalities in survival from cancers of the breast, cervix and ovary. Claudia was a Research Fellow in Medical Statistics and Epidemiology in Pavia (Italy) from 1998 to 2001. From 2001 to 2011, she worked as a Research Fellow in the Epidemiology Unit, Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milan (Italy), on EUROCARE (European Cancer Registry-based study of survival and care of cancer patients) and related studies, and on the HAEMACARE project (haematological malignancies). She has been working in the Cancer Survival Group at LSHTM since October 2011. Claudia’s main interests are in international comparisons of cancer survival, “high-resolution” studies and the estimation of avoidable premature deaths, with a focus on their impact on cancer policy. She has more than 15 years’ experience in this domain. She leads a team of five researchers on data management, quality control and survival analysis for the global surveillance of cancer survival (CONCORD), for which she is co-Principal Investigator. She has been a member of the European Network of Cancer Registries Advisory Committee, working with the European Union’s Joint Research Centre in Ispra (Italy), to produce a set of standardised data quality control procedures for European cancer registries. She has been an advisor to the Italian Ministry of Health on the EU programme for European guidelines on cancer control (CanCon). She has taught epidemiology and medical statistics in many countries.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Wed 7 Feb 2018 from 13:30 to 14:30

MRC HIU Wednesday Seminar Series

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Control of signal-driven gene expression in innate and adaptive lymphocytes

Dr Rahul Roychoudhuri

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Wed 7 Feb 2018 from 14:00 to 15:00

BDI seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar room 0, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

BDI Seminar: What Machine Learning and AI can do for Healthcare

Dr Timor Kadir

There is a great deal of excitement and controversy in the potential of machine learning and artificial intelligence applied to healthcare. Will ML/AI cure cancer? Will it replace doctors? In this talk, I'll discuss some of the real world applications of such technologies and go into some depth... Read more

There is a great deal of excitement and controversy in the potential of machine learning and artificial intelligence applied to healthcare. Will ML/AI cure cancer? Will it replace doctors? In this talk, I'll discuss some of the real world applications of such technologies and go into some depth on two particular areas: stratification of patients at risk of developing lung cancer and management of patients with chronic back pain. Both will be based around medical imaging and I'll discuss what ML/AI can provide beyond what has been possible to date and its impact on the role of clinicians. Timor Kadir graduated with an MEng in Electrical and Electronic Engineering from Surrey University in 1996 and studied for a DPhil at University of Oxford under Sir Michael Brady. He joined CTI/Siemens as a Research Scientist working on computer vision software and in 2009, during a management buy-out, Timor became CTO for Mirada Medical. Most recently, he founded Optellum, a company delivering machine learning based clinical risk stratification. He is currently the CTO of Optellum and visiting fellow at Oxford. He’s published a reasonable number of papers, filed a bunch of patents and his h-index isn’t bad either.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Carol Mulligan-John

Wed 7 Feb 2018 from 15:30 to 16:30

BDI seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar Room 1, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Big Data Ethics Forum

Professor Martin Landray, Professor Clare Mackay

The Big Data Ethics Forum (BDE Forum) is an innovative approach to the identification of ethical issues in the day-to-day practice of big data research. The BDE Forum provides a regular opportunity for scientists working in the BDI to discuss practical ethical problems arising in the development... Read more

The Big Data Ethics Forum (BDE Forum) is an innovative approach to the identification of ethical issues in the day-to-day practice of big data research. The BDE Forum provides a regular opportunity for scientists working in the BDI to discuss practical ethical problems arising in the development and conduct of their research and an opportunity for the sharing of models of good practice. Clare Mackay, Professor of Imaging Neuroscince, Department of Psychiatry: Plans and challenges for creating an open science community in the new Wellcome Centre for Integrative Neuroimaging Martin Landray, Professor of Epidemiology and Medicine, Nuffield Department of Population Health; Deputy Director, BDI: Maximising opportunities for participation in clinical trials

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Carol Mulligan-John

Thu 8 Feb 2018 from 11:00 to 12:00

Ludwig Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, Basement seminar room, TDI, Headington OX3 7FZ

The Role Of The Unfolded Protein Response In Determining Lifespan

Dr Rebecca Taylor

Activation of cellular stress responses can extend longevity in model organisms. One of these stress responses, the endoplasmic reticulum unfolded protein response (UPR), can increase lifespan when activated specifically within the nervous system of C. elegans, through an inter-tissue signaling... Read more

Activation of cellular stress responses can extend longevity in model organisms. One of these stress responses, the endoplasmic reticulum unfolded protein response (UPR), can increase lifespan when activated specifically within the nervous system of C. elegans, through an inter-tissue signaling pathway that communicates UPR activation between neurons and other tissues of the organism. In order to determine whether UPR activation can improve cellular protein folding conditions, either cell-autonomously or cell non-autonomously, we have combined tissue-specific UPR activation with tissue-specific expression of disease-associated misfolded proteins. Our findings suggest that activation of the UPR can reduce the toxicity of misfolded proteins, with differing effects depending upon the type and subcellular localization of the proteotoxic species. In addition, we have examined the metabolic changes that occur downstream of inter-tissue UPR signaling, and, surprisingly, have identified changes in lipid metabolism that may underlie some of the effects of cell non-autonomous UPR activation on both proteostasis and lifespan. These results indicate that UPR signaling affects longevity through changes in metabolism and proteostasis, and suggest that this pathway may represent a promising therapeutic

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Christina Woodward

Thu 8 Feb 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Geratology / Respiratory

Dr Nicola de Savary, Dr Michael Gomez, Dr Rob Hallifax, Dr Naj Rahman

Geratology: "Food for Thought", Dr Nicola de Savary and Dr Michael Gomez -- Respiratory: "Pneumothorax: An evidence free space", Dr Rob Hallifax and Dr Naj Rahman -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Geratology: "Food for Thought", Dr Nicola de Savary and Dr Michael Gomez -- Respiratory: "Pneumothorax: An evidence free space", Dr Rob Hallifax and Dr Naj Rahman -- Chair: Prof Chris Conlon

Audience: Public

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Thu 8 Feb 2018 from 14:00 to 15:00

ARUK Oxford Drug Discovery Institute Seminar Series

NDM Building, Basement Seminar Room, Headington OX3 7FZ

PINK1/Parkin and mitochondrial markers

Dr David Komander

Audience: Public

Organisers: Dr John Davis

Thu 8 Feb 2018 from 16:00 to 17:00

WTCHG High Profile Seminars

Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Rooms A&B, Headington OX3 7BN

SLE genetics: overview and an example of disease mechanism

Professor Tim Vyse

Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a generalised autoimmune disease that can affect virtually any organ/tissue. It exhibits marked sexual dimorphism, being ten times more prevalent in females; it is also more common in non-European populations. Genome-wide association studies have mapped... Read more

Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a generalised autoimmune disease that can affect virtually any organ/tissue. It exhibits marked sexual dimorphism, being ten times more prevalent in females; it is also more common in non-European populations. Genome-wide association studies have mapped approximately 80 risk loci that implicate a range of cells in both the innate and adaptive immune systems. The disease heterogeneity remains to be explained, however, our preliminary analyses suggest that genetic risk operates in a quantitative rather than qualitative manner. I will finally take one example of an SLE risk locus (TNFSF4) that encodes the lymphocyte costimulatory molecule OX40L. I will outline, how transancestral analysis, gene expression studies and the use of mouse models support a cellular mechanism through which the genetic risk alleles predispose to SLE.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Isabel Schmidt

Thu 8 Feb 2018 from 17:00 to 18:00

Health: fresh perspectives

Oxford Martin School, Corner of Catte and Holywell Streets, 34 Broad Street OX1 3BD

Prospects for new tools to control malaria

Professor Kevin Marsh

Malaria remains a global health threat. Over the last 15 years there has been major international investment for malaria control and there have been substantial gains in reducing malaria in many countries, but now there is evidence that these trends are slowing. New approaches are needed to achieve... Read more

Malaria remains a global health threat. Over the last 15 years there has been major international investment for malaria control and there have been substantial gains in reducing malaria in many countries, but now there is evidence that these trends are slowing. New approaches are needed to achieve the global goals of malaria control and elimination. Professor Kevin Marsh, Professor of Tropical Medicine at the Nuffield Department of Medicine in the University of Oxford, will talk about the current exciting areas in malaria research including vaccines, long acting drugs and genetic modification of the mosquito vectors.

Booking Required

Audience: Public

Organisers: Oxford Martin School

Fri 9 Feb 2018 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

Prostate cancer genomic surgery: A shifting paradigm

Mr Alastair Lamb

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 9 Feb 2018 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Potential for HIV Cure/Remission in Paediatric Infection

Prof. Philip Goulder

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 9 Feb 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, Large Lecture Theatre, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Cardioprotection in the setting of acute myocardial infarction: where do we stand in 2018?

Dr Gemma Vilahur

Myocardial infarction due to coronary heart disease is the major cause of death in developed countries and a major determinant for the development of heart failure. Within the last 30 years there has been intense research into cardioprotective therapies capable of limiting cardiac damage due to... Read more

Myocardial infarction due to coronary heart disease is the major cause of death in developed countries and a major determinant for the development of heart failure. Within the last 30 years there has been intense research into cardioprotective therapies capable of limiting cardiac damage due to infarction. However, despite a better comprehension of the molecular and cellular mechanisms triggered during the ischemic insult and further revascularization, and encouraging experimental studies and proof-of-concept clinical trials, very few of the tested agents/interventions have translated to successful clinical trials and none is on standard clinical use. The failure in translation of cardioprotection to clinical practice has been attributed to many factors, from inadequate animal models to poor clinical study designs. In addition, patients usually have cardiovascular risk factors, co-morbidities and concomitant medications that cannot be overlooked since they may interact with the cardioprotective response. Besides improving the design of the experimental and clinical studies the search for new cardioprotective agents must continue. The use of emerging “omic” technologies and bioinformatics tools holds great promise to identify novel targets of therapeutic relevance and new treatment approaches able to limit the damage of myocardial infarction and attenuate the consequent adverse left ventricular remodeling process.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sally Collins

Mon 12 Feb 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Citrullinated epitopes are excellent targets for cancer vaccines

Prof Lindy Durrant

The post-translational conversion of arginine residues to citrulline by peptidylarginine deiminase (PAD) enzymes requires millimolar concentrations of calcium. This can occur during apoptosis leading to precipitation of proteins and stimulation of CD4 and antibody responses which are associated... Read more

The post-translational conversion of arginine residues to citrulline by peptidylarginine deiminase (PAD) enzymes requires millimolar concentrations of calcium. This can occur during apoptosis leading to precipitation of proteins and stimulation of CD4 and antibody responses which are associated with autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Citrullination has also been shown to occur as a result of a degradation and recycling process called autophagy that is induced in stressed cells. As such autophagy and citrullination could be a method for alerting the immune response to any stressed cell including tumour cells. Peptide epitopes from these modified epitopes are presented on MHC-II and stimulate CD4 T cell responses. To this end, we have shown that stress-induced citrullinated peptide epitopes induce potent, cytotoxic CD4 T cell-mediated, anti-tumour responses that could constitute a new class of cancer treatment. ---- Lindy Durrant (LD) is a Prof of Cancer Immunotherapy in the Division of Cancer and Stem cells (CSC) and CSO of Scancell holdings plc.. LD’s research has focused on developing mAbs and vaccines for cancer therapy and she has 147 peer reviewed publications Lindy is the inventor on 66 patents 55 of which have been awarded. She currently has a mAb and a cancer vaccine in phase I/II clinical trials.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Laura Sánchez Lazo

Tue 13 Feb 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

OPDC Seminar Series (DPAG)

Sherrington Building, Sherrington Library, 2nd floor, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Immune and inflammatory mechanisms underlying risk for age-related neurodegenerative disease

Prof. Malú Tansey

The talk will cover the overall research interests in my lab and specifically highlight our work on HLA-DRA SNPs and LRRK2 in human peripheral blood immune cells from subjects with Parkinson’s (versus controls) and the potential role of the gut-brain axis in the pathogenesis of PD. Malú Gámez... Read more

The talk will cover the overall research interests in my lab and specifically highlight our work on HLA-DRA SNPs and LRRK2 in human peripheral blood immune cells from subjects with Parkinson’s (versus controls) and the potential role of the gut-brain axis in the pathogenesis of PD. Malú Gámez Tansey obtained her B.S/M.S in Biological Sciences from Stanford University and her Ph.D. in Physiology from The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas, Texas. Dr. Tansey spent two years in the biotech sector after post-doctoral training at Washington University in St. Louis before returning to academia and is now a tenured Professor of Physiology at Emory University in Atlanta, GA and a member of the Center for Neurodegenerative Disease. Dr. Tansey is the Senior Director of Graduate Studies (DGS) for the Emory Neuroscience Graduate Program and a member of the Executive Committee of the Emory Immunology and Molecular Pathogenesis (IMP) Graduate Program. As a Hispanic American, Dr. Tansey has served as a role model to numerous undergraduate, graduate and post-graduate trainees, many of them women from underrepresented minority groups. She serves as the new Director of Emory’s Initiative for Maximizing Student Development (IMSD) whose mission is to strengthen institutional efforts to enhance recruitment and retention of diverse student and faculty bodies at Emory, by providing research training and mentoring opportunities to both. The general research interests of Dr. Tansey’s laboratory include investigating mechanisms underlying the role of cytokine signaling and brain-immune system crosstalk in health and disease, in particular the role and regulation of central and peripheral inflammatory and immune system responses in modulating the gene-environment and gut-brain axis interactions that determine risk for development and progression of neurodegenerative diseases like Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s and related dementias, and neuropsychiatric diseases like depression.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Melanie Witt

Please note new time!

Tue 13 Feb 2018 from 13:00 to 13:40

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Student presentations

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Tue 13 Feb 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Richard Doll Seminar - Plant foods, antioxidants and the risk of cardiovascular disease, cancer, all-cause and cause-specific mortality

Professor Dagfinn Aune

Dagfinn is Associate Professor at Bjørknes University College in Oslo and Postdoctoral Researcher at Imperial College London. He has worked for several years in the Continuous Update Project of the World Cancer Research Fund, focusing on large-scale systematic reviews and meta-analyses of dietary... Read more

Dagfinn is Associate Professor at Bjørknes University College in Oslo and Postdoctoral Researcher at Imperial College London. He has worked for several years in the Continuous Update Project of the World Cancer Research Fund, focusing on large-scale systematic reviews and meta-analyses of dietary factors, obesity, physical activity and smoking and the associated risks of cardiovascular disease, cancer, type 2 diabetes, other chronic diseases and mortality. His main interests are in nutrition, lifestyle and the prevention of chronic diseases and premature mortality. In this seminar he will explore recommendations regarding intake of fruit and vegetables for the reduction of cardiovascular disease, cancer and mortality, including evidence behind eating 5 servings per day and whether specific types of fruits and vegetables may be particularly beneficial for the prevention of chronic disease. He will also discuss evidence behind intake of grain and nuts.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Wed 14 Feb 2018 from 10:30 to 11:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

St Luke's Chapel, ROQ site, OX2 6GG, Woodstock Road OX2 6GG

Doing the Self: An Ethnographic Analysis of the Quantified Self

Dr Farzana Dudhwala

Abstract Self-quantifying technologies are becoming less 'maverick' and more 'mundane' by the day. Once, they were seen the preserve of a few 'avant garde eccentrics' in the Bay Area, but now Fitbits, heart rate straps and mood apps are part and parcel of daily life. But what is the effect of using... Read more

Abstract Self-quantifying technologies are becoming less 'maverick' and more 'mundane' by the day. Once, they were seen the preserve of a few 'avant garde eccentrics' in the Bay Area, but now Fitbits, heart rate straps and mood apps are part and parcel of daily life. But what is the effect of using these technologies? What is happening when technologies like these are being used to increase 'knowledge' about ourselves? Drawing upon a four year ethnography of the group known as the 'Quantified Self', I discuss how the use of technologies to track and measure the self changes the very nature of the self and its behaviours. I show how these technologies and the surrounding practices of self-quantification are not merely representing or recording the self, innocuously increasing knowledge about a pre-existing self, but are actively and continually complicit in producing the self as it is being measured and 'entracted'. Bio Farzana is currently involved in research within the Digital Health team in HERG. She is part of the INQUIRE project team, trying to understand how online patient feedback and experiences may be used to improve the quality of NHS services. Her theoretical and methodological interests are in the field of Science and Technology Studies (STS), specifically theories of agency, performativity, multiplicity, and enactment, and qualitative methodologies such as ethnography. Farzana has an undergraduate degree in Social and Political Sciences from the University of Cambridge and an MPhil in Innovation, Strategy, and Organisations from the Judge Business School, also at the University of Cambridge. She did her PhD at the University of Oxford at the Saïd Business School, and it involved a four year ethnography with the ‘Quantified Self’ to understand the ways in which self-monitoring and self-quantifying technologies are implicated in the ‘doing’ of the self.

Audience: University non-academia, and members of the public

Organisers: Dr Chrysanthi Papoutsi

Wed 14 Feb 2018 from 11:00 to 12:30

Population Health Seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar Room 0, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Ethox Seminar: Transformative experience and adolescent capacity to refuse life-prolonging treatment

Dr Isra Black

The paper that Isra presents stems from collaborative work with Lisa Forsberg (Oxford) and Anthony Skelton (Western). In several English cases in which adolescents have sought to refuse life-prolonging treatment (LPT) (Re E, Re S, Re L), the court refers to a lack of knowledge about what it is... Read more

The paper that Isra presents stems from collaborative work with Lisa Forsberg (Oxford) and Anthony Skelton (Western). In several English cases in which adolescents have sought to refuse life-prolonging treatment (LPT) (Re E, Re S, Re L), the court refers to a lack of knowledge about what it is like to die as grounds for finding decision-making incapacity. By contrast, the court has found no adult incompetent to refuse LPT on phenomenal grounds. Indeed, such a requirement was deprecated in Re MB and Re W. L. A. Paul’s work on transformative experience provides analytical guidance with respect to these cases. Paul argues that decisions over choices whose options include radically new experience, and whose selection may change an individual’s personal preferences, cannot be taken rationally in the sense normative decision theory requires. This is because individuals lack access to information about the relevant phenomena and their own future preferences necessary to assign values to the outcomes of transformative options—a requirement of decision theory. We argue the decision to refuse LPT involves transformative choice. Most do not know what it is like to die, or how dying might alter their preferences. This matters because the tests for decision-making capacity are decision-theoretic in nature. If one cannot assign values to transformative choices, it seems that few, whether adults or adolescents, possess legal capacity to refuse LPT. This presents a problem for those wishing to treat adolescents and adults differently in respect of refusing LPT on this ground. We argue that consistency requires either that both are treated according to the standard that currently governs adults or that both are governed by some higher standard such as the one governing adolescents. If lack of knowledge is insufficient to differentiate adolescents and adults in respect of the capacity to refuse LPT, treating adolescent refusals differently must be done on some other (principled) grounds. If you would like to attend, please e-mail Jane Beinart at jane.beinart@ethox.ox.ac.uk.

Booking Recommended

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Wed 14 Feb 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

Peter Medawar Building Seminars

Medawar Building, Level 30 Seminar Room, off South Parks Road OX1 3SY

The role of host and pathogen population structure in the dynamics of drug and multi-drug resistance

Sonja Lehtinen

Understanding the short- and long-term dynamics of drug and multi-drug resistance is important for public health. Yet, there are pervasive trends in resistance dynamics that have not been fully explained. Firstly, antibiotic sensitive and resistant strains coexist robustly, despite prolonged... Read more

Understanding the short- and long-term dynamics of drug and multi-drug resistance is important for public health. Yet, there are pervasive trends in resistance dynamics that have not been fully explained. Firstly, antibiotic sensitive and resistant strains coexist robustly, despite prolonged selection pressure from antibiotics. Secondly, resistance to different antibiotics tends to co-occur on the same strains, leading to high frequencies of multi-drug resistance (MDR). First, we present a model in which coexistence is maintained by variation in duration of carriage within the pathogen population (e.g. pneumococcal serotypes differing in duration of carriage) because the fitness effect of resistance depends on duration of carriage. Second, we show that this model is structurally similar to other plausible models of coexistence where the coexistence-maintaining mechanism is based on variation in the fitness benefit of resistance, and that models with this structure also give rise to high MDR frequencies, because resistance against all antibiotics is concentrated in the sub-populations where the fitness advantage gained from resistance is high. We find that predictions about patterns of resistance and multi-drug resistance from this model are qualitatively consistent with trends observed in multiple Streptococcus pneumoniae datasets. This model provides a parsimonious explanation for the pervasiveness of high MDR frequencies and allows us to reconcile this trend with observed long-term stability in the prevalence of resistance.

Audience: UK Science Community

Organisers: Ramona Kantschuster

Please arrive 5 minutes before the Seminar begins to gain building access

Thu 15 Feb 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

Medical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

ICU / Renal

Dr Claire Colebourn, Dr Jodie Smythe, Dr Paul Harden, Dr Matthew Brook

ICU: "The hungry heart: echocardiographic changes in anorexia nervosa", Dr Claire Colebourn and Dr Jodie Smythe -- Renal: "Not just a flash in the PAN - Diagnosis and longer term outcomes in polyarteritis nodosa", Dr Matthew Brook and Dr Paul Harden -- Chair: Prof Hugh Watkins

ICU: "The hungry heart: echocardiographic changes in anorexia nervosa", Dr Claire Colebourn and Dr Jodie Smythe -- Renal: "Not just a flash in the PAN - Diagnosis and longer term outcomes in polyarteritis nodosa", Dr Matthew Brook and Dr Paul Harden -- Chair: Prof Hugh Watkins

Audience: Public

Audience: Members of the University and NHS clinical staff.

Thu 15 Feb 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

NDPH Seminar - Measuring premature mortality and disability from cardiovascular diseases worldwide: Evidence from the Global Burden of Disease Study

Alan Lopez, MS, PhD, is a Melbourne Laureate Professor and the Rowden-White Chair of Global Health and Burden of Disease Measurement at the University of Melbourne. He is also Director of the Global Burden of Disease Group in the Melbourne School of Population and Global Health. He is an Affiliate... Read more

Alan Lopez, MS, PhD, is a Melbourne Laureate Professor and the Rowden-White Chair of Global Health and Burden of Disease Measurement at the University of Melbourne. He is also Director of the Global Burden of Disease Group in the Melbourne School of Population and Global Health. He is an Affiliate Professor of Global Health at the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME) at the University of Washington. He held prior appointments as Professor of Medical Statistics and Population Health, Professor of Global Health, and Head of the School of Population Health at the University of Queensland from 2003 to 2012. Prior to joining the University, he worked at the World Health Organization (WHO) in Geneva, Switzerland for 22 years where he held a series of technical and senior managerial posts including Chief Epidemiologist in WHO’s Tobacco Control Program, Manager of WHO’s Program on Substance Abuse, Director of the Epidemiology and Burden of Disease Unit, and Senior Science Advisor to the Director-General. Professor Lopez is a highly cited author whose publications have received worldwide acclaim for their importance and influence in health and medical research. He is the co-author with Christopher Murray of the seminal Global Burden of Disease Study (1996), which has greatly influenced debates about priority setting and resource allocation in health. He is the co-author with Sir Richard Peto of the Peto-Lopez method, which is widely used to estimate tobacco-attributable mortality to support policy action. In June of 2016, Dr. Lopez was appointed Companion of the Order of Australia (AC) in the Queen’s Birthday Honours List for his remarkable contributions to health science and the advancement of public health in developing countries.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Fri 16 Feb 2018 from 08:00 to 09:00

Surgical Grand Rounds

John Radcliffe Academic, Lecture Theatre 1, Headington OX3 9DU

vascular biomechanics applied to disease research and the medical device industry

Professor Christopher Cheng

Professor Chris Cheng is an Adjunct Professor in the Division of Vascular Surgery at Stanford, and splits his time between the medical device industry and running the Stanford Vascular Intervention Biomechanics & Engineering Lab (vibelab.stanford.edu). On the industry side, Professor Cheng has... Read more

Professor Chris Cheng is an Adjunct Professor in the Division of Vascular Surgery at Stanford, and splits his time between the medical device industry and running the Stanford Vascular Intervention Biomechanics & Engineering Lab (vibelab.stanford.edu). On the industry side, Professor Cheng has worked on several cardiovascular devices at large and small companies, and is currently CEO of Kōli, Inc., an early-stage medical device company developing a percutaneous solution to gallstone disease. For this Grand Round, Professor Cheng will present work from the VIBE Lab, which focuses on quantifying the dynamic vascular system using medical imaging. While the VIBE Lab’s research pursuits seek to add to the fundamental understanding of cardiovascular biomechanics, all of the projects are directly related understanding disease processes and improving medical device design, evaluation, regulation, and their use in clinical practice. Professor Cheng is currently serving as an "Expert in Residence" with the Medical Sciences Division. https://www.medsci.ox.ac.uk/support-services/teams/business-development/industry-experts-in-residence/surgical-technologies

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Tarryn Ching

Fri 16 Feb 2018 from 09:15 to 10:15

MRC HIU Friday Morning Lab Meetings

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Pathogenic immune responses in spondyloarthritis

Dr Hussein Al-Mossawi

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer

Fri 16 Feb 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

CNCB Seminar Series

Oxford Martin School, 34 Broad Street OX1 3BD

Toward Circuit Optogenetics

Valentina Emiliani

Parallel holographic illumination has emerged as a technique of choice for two-photon optogenetic control of neuronal circuits organized in three dimensions. Complementary variants of 3D holographic illumination are optimized for simplicity, temporal precision, or axial resolution. The possibility... Read more

Parallel holographic illumination has emerged as a technique of choice for two-photon optogenetic control of neuronal circuits organized in three dimensions. Complementary variants of 3D holographic illumination are optimized for simplicity, temporal precision, or axial resolution. The possibility of reaching hundreds of targets in 3D volumes has prompted the development of low-repetition-rate amplified laser sources that achieve high total exit power while keeping low the average power exposure of each cell. These advances allow neuronal circuits distributed between different brain areas to be optically interrogated and controlled with millisecond temporal precision and single-cell resolution. I will review past accomplishments and necessary future developments in circuit optogenetics.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Fiona Woods

Fri 16 Feb 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

DPAG Head of Department Seminar Series

Sherrington Building, Large Lecture Theatre, off Parks Road OX1 3PT

Regulation of the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) by hormonal and local mediators

Professor Christoph Korbmacher

The epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) is a member of the ENaC/degenerin family of ion channels. ENaC is localized in the apical membrane of epithelial cells and is the rate limiting step for sodium absorption in epithelial tissues including the aldosterone-sensitive distal nephron (ASDN), the distal... Read more

The epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) is a member of the ENaC/degenerin family of ion channels. ENaC is localized in the apical membrane of epithelial cells and is the rate limiting step for sodium absorption in epithelial tissues including the aldosterone-sensitive distal nephron (ASDN), the distal colon and respiratory epithelia. Abnormal ENaC activation in the ASDN may cause renal sodium retention and arterial hypertension. This is evidenced by gain-of-function mutations of ENaC which cause Liddle syndrome (pseudohyperaldosteronism), a severe form of salt-sensitive hypertension. In the ASDN hormonal and local mediators contribute to ENaC regulation in a highly complex manner with aldosterone-dependent and -independent mechanisms. A unique feature of ENaC is its proteolytic activation which involves specific cleavage sites and the release of inhibitory peptide fragments. Under pathophysiological conditions abnormal ENaC activation by urinary proteases may contribute to sodium retention in nephrotic syndrome. The identity of physiologically relevant tubular proteases involved in proteolytic ENaC activation remains to be elucidated. In addition, renal interstitial proteases may stimulate ENaC mediated transepithelial transport through PAR2 (protease-activated receptor 2) localized in the basolateral membrane of tubular epithelial cells. This may be relevant in inflammatory renal disease. Recently, bile acids known to activate BASIC (bile acid-sensitive ion channel), another member of the ENaC/degenerin family of ion channels, have been shown to modify ENaC function. It is tempting to speculate that bile acids or other endogenous amphiphilic substances may affect ENaC function by interacting with specific channel regions.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Sally Collins

Fri 16 Feb 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Richard Doll Seminars: Population Science in Africa

Dr Majinder Sandhu

Manj’s research seeks to improve our understanding of genomic diversity and the development of and susceptibility to complex diseases by integrating population genetics, epidemiology and genomic wide technologies. His research is focused on low and middle income countries and particularly those... Read more

Manj’s research seeks to improve our understanding of genomic diversity and the development of and susceptibility to complex diseases by integrating population genetics, epidemiology and genomic wide technologies. His research is focused on low and middle income countries and particularly those in Africa and South-East Asia. He led the development and delivery of the African Genome Variation Project – a major resource that provides insights into population genome diversity in Africa and is engaged in a programme of work to study ancient DNA and indigenous populations groups. He established and co-directs the African Partnership for Chronic Disease Research (APCDR), an international network of scientists committed to strengthening research capacity and undertaking chronic disease research in Africa. Alongside this he is the co-director of the Ugandan Medical Informatics Centre (UMIC) an integrated data centre providing computational resources to African institutions across the region.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Mon 19 Feb 2018 from 12:00 to 13:00

Kennedy Institute Seminars

Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bernard Sunley Lecture Theatre, Headington OX3 7LF

Non-coding RNAs in immunity and inflammation

Dr Dimitris Lagos

I will discuss novel mechanistic links between long and short non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) and mammalian immune responses in the context of chronic inflammation with a particular focus on CD4+ T cell responses and gene regulation in the endothelium. Data from human primary cells and whole animal models... Read more

I will discuss novel mechanistic links between long and short non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) and mammalian immune responses in the context of chronic inflammation with a particular focus on CD4+ T cell responses and gene regulation in the endothelium. Data from human primary cells and whole animal models of deficiency of highly conserved miRNAs or lncRNAs will be presented. The overarching implication of this work is that ncRNAs are non-redundant regulators of immunity and that studying ncRNAs can provide critical insights into unique features of the mammalian immune system. ---- Dimitris Lagos is a Senior Lecturer in Immunology at the University of York. After completing his training as a chemical engineer in Athens he moved to Sheffield to pursue a PhD in monoclonal antibody engineering, spending time in AstraZeneca and the University of Zurich. Following his PhD, he moved to the CRUK Viral Oncology Group at UCL to study host responses to oncogenic viruses. There he developed a strong interest in immune gene expression regulation and specifically non-coding RNAs, which remains the focus of his group. His work has been supported by the MRC (including New Investigator, Global Challenges Research Fund, and Confidence in Concept research grants), The Wellcome Trust, and the BBSRC.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Laura Sánchez Lazo

Mon 19 Feb 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

WIMM MONDAY SEMINARS

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Toasting the genome - How alcohol and endogenous aldehydes damage stem cells

Professor KJ Patel

Audience: Public

Organisers: Kevin Clark

Mon 19 Feb 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

SGC Seminars

NDM Building, TDI seminar room, Headington OX3 7FZ

Human stem cells for drug discovery

Dr Nicola Beer

Abstract: Dr Nicola Beer heads up the Department of Stem Cell Engineering at the Novo Nordisk Research Centre Oxford. Her team uses human stem cells to derive metabolically-relevant cells and tissues such as islets, hepatocytes, and adipocytes to discover novel secreted factors and corresponding... Read more

Abstract: Dr Nicola Beer heads up the Department of Stem Cell Engineering at the Novo Nordisk Research Centre Oxford. Her team uses human stem cells to derive metabolically-relevant cells and tissues such as islets, hepatocytes, and adipocytes to discover novel secreted factors and corresponding signalling pathways which modify cell function, health, and viability. By combining in vitro-differentiated human stem cell-derived models with CRISPR and other genomic targeting techniques, the team assay cell function from changes in a single gene up to a genome-wide scale. Understanding the genes and pathways underlying cell function (and dysfunction) highlights potential targets for new Type 2 Diabetes therapeutics. Dr Beer will talk about the work ongoing in her team, as well as more broadly about the role of human stem cells in drug discovery and patient treatment. Short bio: Dr Nicola Beer is Head of the Department of Stem Cell Engineering at the Novo Nordisk Research Centre Oxford. Prior to joining Novo Nordisk, Nicola was a Naomi Berrie Fellow in Diabetes within the group of Professorss McCarthy and Gloyn at the University of Oxford, and prior to that was a Fulbright-Diabetes UK Post-Doctoral Fellow in the laboratory of Professor David Altshuler in the Medical and Population Genetics Program at the Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT. She conducted her PhD in Clinical Medicine in the Oxford Centre for Diabetes, Endocrinology, and Metabolism (OCDEM) under the supervision of Professors Anna Gloyn and Patrik Rorsman, and has also spent time working in the laboratory of Professor Francis Collins at the National Institutes of Health (MD, USA) and the Cardiovascular and Gastrointestinal Drug Discovery department of the pharmaceutical company AstraZeneca.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Natsumi Astley

Mon 19 Feb 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Richard Doll Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Richard Doll Seminar - Mylotarg from clinical trial to licensing: A fifteen year odyssey

Professor Robert Hills

Robert Hills is Professor of Translational Statistics at the Centre for Trials Research, Cardiff University, and Lead for Clinical Cancer Research Methodology. His interests include novel trial designs to maximise data from patients in increasingly genetically delineated conditions, and... Read more

Robert Hills is Professor of Translational Statistics at the Centre for Trials Research, Cardiff University, and Lead for Clinical Cancer Research Methodology. His interests include novel trial designs to maximise data from patients in increasingly genetically delineated conditions, and meta-analyses of data from different trials, including a recent individual patient data meta-analysis of gemtuzumab ozogamicin (mylotarg) which has been used to support licensing applications in The United States and the EU. Since 2006 he has worked in Cardiff as statistician for the NCRI Trials in Acute Myeloid Leukaemia, including introducing the multi-arm multi-stage Pick-A-Winner design for older patients not suitable for intensive chemotherapy, which has so far accumulated data on a dozen comparisons. The NCRI AML trials have also accumulated over 10,000 samples, which has allowed investigations of both prognostic and predictive markers. These results have enabled improved risk stratification and the identification of patients who are not well served by current therapy. In his talk he will explore the story of Mylotarg, from the first randomised controlled trial (AML15) in 2002 through to the recent approval by the FDA last autumn, including the role of the IPD meta-analysis.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Tue 20 Feb 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

Molecular Haematology Unit, WIMM

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Seminar room, Headington OX3 9DS

How chromatin organises in mammalian cells - lessons from 3D super-resolution microscopy

Dr. Lothar Schermelleh

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Liz Rose

Tue 20 Feb 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Richard Doll Seminar - SGLT2 inhibition for treating diabetes – an approach which achieves far more than just lowering glucose?

Professor David Matthews

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Wed 21 Feb 2018 from 10:30 to 11:30

Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences - Department research seminars

St Luke's Chapel, Woodstock Road OX2 6GG

To engage or involve? PE and PPI explored

Helen Adams

Helen Adams and Lynne Maddocks will explore the interface between engaging the public in your research and involving them. They will answer your questions on this relating to your specific projects.

Helen Adams and Lynne Maddocks will explore the interface between engaging the public in your research and involving them. They will answer your questions on this relating to your specific projects.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Lynne Maddocks

Wed 21 Feb 2018 from 11:00 to 12:30

Population Health Seminars

Big Data Institute, Seminar Room 0, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Ethox Seminar: Genes wide open - A qualitative study to explore the motives, experiences and attitudes of individuals who openly share their genomic data

Tobias Haeusermann

Direct-to-consumer genetic testing companies (DTC-GT) market their service as tools for empowering consumers to make more informed and, arguably, better decisions about their health, wellness and lifestyle. Their business model, however, also entails collecting large privately owned genetic... Read more

Direct-to-consumer genetic testing companies (DTC-GT) market their service as tools for empowering consumers to make more informed and, arguably, better decisions about their health, wellness and lifestyle. Their business model, however, also entails collecting large privately owned genetic databases which can be exploited commercially. Openly sharing genetic and genomic data, in turn, carries highly valuable scientific yield and bears the potential to not only serve as a primary research tool for established scientists but also pave the way for participant-driven research initiatives. The aim of this study was to explore the motives, experiences and attitudes of individuals who openly share their DTC-GT results without any privacy protection and without institutional oversight on the non-profit platform openSNP. In this talk I will report the findings of a qualitative follow-up study to a structured questionnaire, with a view to support the further exploration of open genetic data sharing and its implications for genetic privacy and genomic utility.

Booking Recommended

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Wed 21 Feb 2018 from 13:00 to 14:00

Population Health Seminars

Richard Doll Building, Richard Doll Lecture Theatre, Old Road Campus OX3 7LF

Richard Doll Seminar - Your Face Tomorrow: Prevention in the era of big data and miniaturized disease models

Professor Dr. Cornelia van Duijn is a professor of Genetic Epidemiology at the Erasmus University Medical Center and Translational Epidemiology at the University of Leiden. For over 25 years, her work has focused on discovering genes involved in age related disorders including Alzheimer disease,... Read more

Professor Dr. Cornelia van Duijn is a professor of Genetic Epidemiology at the Erasmus University Medical Center and Translational Epidemiology at the University of Leiden. For over 25 years, her work has focused on discovering genes involved in age related disorders including Alzheimer disease, glaucoma, dyslipidemia and hypertension. She has been a leading figure in various international genome wide association consortia including the International Genetics of Alzheimer Disease Project (IGAP) and the ADSP (Alzheimer Disease Sequencing Project). At present, she combines genomics research with high-throughput metabolomics in large scale epidemiological biobanks and organ-on-chip models to translate finding to prevention and care.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Graham Bagley

Wed 21 Feb 2018 from 13:30 to 14:30

MRC HIU Wednesday Seminar Series

MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, WIMM Seminar Room, Headington OX3 9DS

Targeting immune regulation within tumours

Professor Sergio Quesada

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Anne Farmer