Tropical Medicine Seminars

Thu 1 Oct 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

Tropical Medicine Global Health Seminars

NDM Building, Basement Seminar Room, Catering provided so please arrive promptly - First come, first served, Headington OX3 7FZ

The use of routine case record data to evaluate quality of inpatient hospital care for newborns and children in Kenya

Quality of care assessment is one of the ways of evaluating what the health system is providing and can allow monitoring and evaluation exercises to track progress and identify gaps. Such monitoring however depends on an ability to measure quality with the availability of high quality data being... Read more

Quality of care assessment is one of the ways of evaluating what the health system is providing and can allow monitoring and evaluation exercises to track progress and identify gaps. Such monitoring however depends on an ability to measure quality with the availability of high quality data being central to these assessments. In low-resource settings routine health or hospital information system data are very limited, often of poor quality, and are typically summarized (e.g. total cases per ward) before being entered into the national health information system database. Such routine data very rarely include any information on a patient’s clinical findings or treatment. Thus at present routine data that are collected do not provide for individual patient level analyses of the process of care. This work is from a group of studies that seek to demonstrate how case record data may be used to evaluate quality of care in routine hospital settings in Kenya and by doing this promote the availability of quality data and its effective use as one means to promote improvement in services provided in Kenyan hospitals. This work provides important insights into whether hospitalized children and newborns are receiving the correct care are using process of care assessments conducted in relatively large numbers of cases, across multiple locations and across time. We apply more advanced statistical methods including hierarchical modelling, propensity scores and multiple imputation as some of the approaches of getting the most from routine data. About the Speaker: David is a research officer with Health Systems Research Group (HSRG) at KEMRI/Wellcome Trust Research Programme Nairobi. He studied Bsc. Nursing at Moi University Kenya and holds a Master of Science in Epidemiology from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. He is currently a PhD student, registered at the University of Amsterdam. Since joining KEMRI/Wellcome Trust Research Programme in August 2008, his research work has spanned a range of disciplines including, clinical trials, evaluation of quality of care within hospitals and exploration of the application of various statistical methods (propensity score analysis, multi-level models and statistical process control) to routine data. David also hold different responsibilities including being an executive member of the International Epidemiology Association-Kenyan Chapter and in 2015 he was co-opted into the national Ministry of Health technical working group on Monitoring and Evaluation. David has broad interests’ health informatics and its integration with epidemiology to monitor disease trends, interventions effects, identify quality of care gaps and the use of this data for effective decision making.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Francois Van Loggerenberg

When arriving and leaving the building please use the marked pedestrian route, and not the road, due the building works.

Wed 21 Oct 2015 from 13:00 to 14:00

Tropical Medicine Global Health Seminars

NDM Building, Basement Seminar Room, Catering provided so please arrive promptly - First come, first served, Headington OX3 7FZ

Co-circulation of human monkeypox virus and varicella-zoster virus (chickenpox) in the Sankuru district, Democratic Republic of Congo

Chelsea McMullen

Monkeypox virus (MPXV) is an emerging zoonosis with dramatically increased incidence in forested regions of Central Africa in the past 30 years. It is considered the most important virus in the orthopoxvirus genus since the eradication of smallpox (variola), but causes milder clinical symptoms... Read more

Monkeypox virus (MPXV) is an emerging zoonosis with dramatically increased incidence in forested regions of Central Africa in the past 30 years. It is considered the most important virus in the orthopoxvirus genus since the eradication of smallpox (variola), but causes milder clinical symptoms similar to chickenpox, caused by varicella zoster virus (VZV). There have been reports of the co-circulation of MPXV and VZV; however, a sustained outbreak of both viruses has never been confirmed. Here, we use data from a 2005-2007 active surveillance program for human MPX in Kasai Oriental province, Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) to show that co-circulation has occurred in 9 health zones of the Sankuru District. The talk will present an overview of the study, the potential epidemiological significance of the findings, potential geographical factors involved in co-circulation, and the challenges researchers faced in the field. About the speaker: Chelsea McMullen joined the International Severe Acute Respiratory and Emerging Infection Consortium (ISARIC) in June as the Operational Support Officer. Before this, she completed a Master of Science in Global Health at Duke University, focusing on epidemiology of emerging zoonotic diseases and global health policy. She spent the second year of the programme doing fieldwork in DRC, studying interspecies transmission of respiratory viruses at Lola ya Bonobo primate sanctuary, and working on projects related to Ebola, schistosomiasis and HIV, vaccination coverage and monkeypox with the UCLA-DRC Research Group. Previously, she interned with WHO’s Global Malaria Programme as a Duke Global Health Fellow, and earned a BS in biology from the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, where she studied the pathogenesis of chordoma cancer.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Francois Van Loggerenberg

When arriving and leaving the building please use the marked pedestrian route, and not the road, due the building works.

Thu 12 Nov 2015 from 14:15 to 18:00

Tropical Medicine Seminars

John Radcliffe Hospital, Lecture Theatre 2

Tropical Medicine Day 2015

Dr Chris Paton, Professor Kevin Marsh, Professor Trudie Lang, Prof Philippe Guerin, Dr Amanda Rojek, Dr Georgina Murphy, Professor Hilton Whittle

Audience: Public

Tue 24 Nov 2015 from 12:00 to 13:00

Tropical Medicine Global Health Seminars

NDM Building, Basement Seminar Room, Catering provided so please arrive promptly - First come, first served, Headington OX3 7FZ

Research papers that make a difference: discussing research waste, reproducibility and impact

Dr Iveta Simera

Poor reporting seriously affects the integrity of health research literature and critically limits the use and impact of published studies. Publications that lack or selectively present important information are one of the major contributors to the avoidable waste of financial and human investments... Read more

Poor reporting seriously affects the integrity of health research literature and critically limits the use and impact of published studies. Publications that lack or selectively present important information are one of the major contributors to the avoidable waste of financial and human investments in medical research. The EQUATOR (Enhancing the QUAlity and Transparency Of health Research) Network is an international programme of work set up to improve the reliability and usability of health research publications. It provides a free online portal with essential resources for researchers, authors, journal editors, peer reviewers and everyone involved in health research and its publication (www.equator-network.org). The EQUATOR team supports the use of these resources through education and training activities and assists in the development, dissemination and implementation of reporting guidelines. In my talk I will outline key problems identified in the current health research literature, highlight the consequences of inadequate reporting of research and will discuss some possible solutions to improve transparency, usability and impact of research papers, including the use of reporting guidelines and other resources hosted by the EQUATOR Network.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Francois Van Loggerenberg

Refreshments provided - please arrive early. First come, first served.

Fri 4 Dec 2015 from 14:30 to 15:30

Tropical Medicine Global Health Seminars

NDM Building, Basement Seminar Room, Catering provided so please arrive promptly - First come, first served, Headington OX3 7FZ

Moving the Centre of Gravity of Research in Africa

Professor Kevin Marsh

Africa has 15% of the worlds population and 25% of its health problems but less than 1% of its researchers. This represents a major challenge in a world where science technology and innovation are widely seen as being key drivers of development. However there are signs of change, with most... Read more

Africa has 15% of the worlds population and 25% of its health problems but less than 1% of its researchers. This represents a major challenge in a world where science technology and innovation are widely seen as being key drivers of development. However there are signs of change, with most African countries having strong economic growth, key heath indicators improving and a renewed commitment to science as a central pillar of the continents future. I will provide an overview of the landscape of science, particularly health research, in Africa and discuss recent key changes in the approach to building scientific capacity.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Francois Van Loggerenberg

Spaces are limited

Tue 8 Dec 2015 from 08:30 to 18:00

Tropical Medicine Seminars

Saïd Business School, Park End Street OX1 1HP

Crossing Boundaries 2 – Health Research Relevant to LMIC Across Oxford’s Disciplines and Divisions

This Conference aims to showcase the diversity and quality of Health Research being undertaken in or relevant to improving health in Low and Middle Income Countries’ that is linked to Oxford; to illustrate the range of disciplines engaged in supporting the development of LMIC health systems and... Read more

This Conference aims to showcase the diversity and quality of Health Research being undertaken in or relevant to improving health in Low and Middle Income Countries’ that is linked to Oxford; to illustrate the range of disciplines engaged in supporting the development of LMIC health systems and to promote multi- disciplinary collaborations; to showcase Oxford’s DPhil Research in Global Health. Sessions will be delivered by experts from: The Nuffield Department of Medicine; The Department of Education; The Institute of Biomedical Engineering; The Department of Primary Health Care; The Ethox Centre; The Department of Clinical Healthcare Brookes University; The Department of Social Policy and Intervention. Current or recently graduated DPhil students are encouraged to submit abstracts for combined rapid oral & poster presentation with a special session devoted to this during the meeting. Prizes wlll be awarded for the best student presentation & project.

Booking Required

Audience: Members of the University only