Tropical Medicine Seminars

Thu 14 Apr 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

Tropical Medicine Global Health Seminars

NDM Building, Basement seminar room, Headington OX3 7FZ

RAPIDE Platform for Ebola treatment studies

Professor Peter Horby

The RAPIDE platform was a unique & novel platform for assessing potential treatments for Ebola virus disease. The trial design was pragmatic and aimed to achieve answers quickly and appropriately within the context of an unprecedented infectious disease. The Wellcome Trust were able to rapidly fund... Read more

The RAPIDE platform was a unique & novel platform for assessing potential treatments for Ebola virus disease. The trial design was pragmatic and aimed to achieve answers quickly and appropriately within the context of an unprecedented infectious disease. The Wellcome Trust were able to rapidly fund the study. There was a remarkable collaborative effort between the affected countries, humanitarian organisations, governments, public health agencies and National Health Staff. The study examined two potential treatments using a phase II trial: Brincidofovir was tested in Liberia and TKM-130803 was tested in Sierra Leone. Professor Horby will discuss the difficulties with running clinical trials under such challenging conditions.   More about the speaker: Peter is a clinical academic who trained in adult medicine, infectious diseases and public health in the UK and Australia. He is Director of the Epidemic Diseases Research Group at Oxford (ERGO) where he is involved in conducting clinical and epidemiological research on epidemic and emerging infections. He has previously held positions with the UK Health Protection Agency, WHO, and was the founding Director of the Oxford University Clinical Research Unit at the National Hospital for Tropical Diseases, Hanoi, Vietnam. He has worked extensively in resource constrained settings and has led research on a range of emerging and epidemic infections, including variant CJD, SARS, H5N1, H7N9, dengue, cholera, measles, Streptococcus suis, and Hand Foot and Mouth Disease. He is the Principal Investigator of the Wellcome Trust funded platform for evaluating experimental therapeutics for Ebola – Rapid Assessment of Potential Interventions and Drugs for Ebola (RAPIDE). His team have been evaluating an intravenous anti-Ebola preparation (TKM-Ebola) in Sierra Leone and Peter supporting the evaluation of convalescent plasma in Sierra Leone and Guinea.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Francois Van Loggerenberg

Refreshments are provided, please arrive in good time.

Fri 15 Apr 2016 from 14:00 to 15:00

Tropical Medicine Global Health Seminars

NDM Building, Basement seminar room, Headington OX3 7FZ

Ebola: Response, sequencing, vaccines and survivors

Professor Miles W Carrol

The European Mobile Laboratory (EMLab) was the first EBOV diagnostics unit deployed to the outbreak epicentre by WHO in March 2014. This enabled access to many thousands of EBOV positive samples which were transported back to Europe and analysed by deep sequencing platforms to reveal the virus... Read more

The European Mobile Laboratory (EMLab) was the first EBOV diagnostics unit deployed to the outbreak epicentre by WHO in March 2014. This enabled access to many thousands of EBOV positive samples which were transported back to Europe and analysed by deep sequencing platforms to reveal the virus mutation rate and gain in site into pathogen transmission (Carroll et al Nature 2015). Using the MinION, miniature sequencing device, the EMLab subsequently performed NGS on positive samples within Guinea in as little as 24 hours from receipt of positive samples. This enabled the provision of real time molecular epidemiology that helped guide the frontline activities of contact tracing to help halt the transmission chains (Quick et al Nature 2016). The research arm of the EMLab, EVIDENT, also established a study to dissect the immune response of EBOV disease survivors and make comparisons with that induced by vaccination. Additional studies on direct contacts of people infected with EBOV, indicates that many of them have immunity to the virus suggesting the official number of those infected during the outbreak is a significant underestimate. EVIDENT also supported the phase III ring vaccine trial and the favipiravir JIKI therapeutic trial. Miles Carroll joined Public Health England as Deputy Director, Head of Research at Porton Down in September 2008. In his current role he is responsible for > 250 scientists and support services personnel. He also has strategic and operational control to ensure that the Department is at the forefront of translational research in the areas of emerging diseases, diagnostics and decontamination, host pathogen interactions, infectious disease vaccines and therapeutics. Miles gained his PhD from the Medical Faculty at the University of Manchester which enabled him to obtain an International Fogarty Fellowship and continue his studies on recombinant poxviruses at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, USA. On his return to the UK, Miles Joined Oxford Biomedica as Vice President of Immunotherapy. At OBM Miles invented the cancer vaccine, TroVax and led the pre-clinical and Phase II development programme. Miles has authored >60 publications primarily in the field of recombinant vaccines and emerging diseases, and has >10 granted patents. He has acted as an advisor to several biotech companies, appeared as an expert witness in both European and US patent cases. He also serves on the Scientific Review Boards of both Animal and Plant Health Institute (Weybridge) and Defence Science and Technology Laboratories. Miles is honorary Professor of Vaccinology at the Medical Faculty of the University of Southampton.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Francois Van Loggerenberg

Please note new time. Refreshments provided - please arrive early

Tue 19 Apr 2016 from 12:00 to 13:00

Tropical Medicine Global Health Seminars

NDM Building, Basement Seminar Room, Catering provided so please arrive promptly - First come, first served, Headington OX3 7FZ

Putting Programmers into Programs: modelling and capacity building in malaria control programs

Prof Lisa White

There is no “one size fits all” intervention for malaria elimination due to the spectrum of available sub-optimal interventions acting at different stages of the parasite life-cycle and the heterogeneous transmission landscape. Every district of every country has its own unique challenges,... Read more

There is no “one size fits all” intervention for malaria elimination due to the spectrum of available sub-optimal interventions acting at different stages of the parasite life-cycle and the heterogeneous transmission landscape. Every district of every country has its own unique challenges, conditions and solutions. Mathematical modelling is the best available approach for combining the many interacting factors that must be considered. This approach would increase the cost-effectiveness of a national elimination strategy if it were integrated into the national malaria control program. However, mathematical modelling is a relatively new discipline and has yet to reach many of the countries where malaria elimination is being implemented. A project is underway to simultaneously develop bespoke mathematical models for the Asian setting and train a new group of mathematical modelers embedded within their national malaria control programs. These modelers have formed a network where expertise and model programs are shared freely within the group. Through their national modelers, national control programs are able to access the full suite of models developed by the project staff and modify them to answer nationally relevant questions. More about the speaker: Lisa White is currently the head of an Oxford University mathematical and economic modelling (MAEMOD) group based in Thailand at the Mahidol-Oxford Tropical Medicine Research Unit whose research focus is on tropical infections and primarily malaria. MAEMOD coordinates an international network of infectious disease modellers and modelling research beneficiaries working in the Tropics (TDModNet). Her work on malaria combines within and between host infection models with multi-strain/species modelling to consider the characterisation, emergence and spread of antimalarial drug resistance and its containment. She has strong collaborative links with the National Center of Malaria Control (CNM) in Cambodia and members of the WHO concerned with the containment of artemisinin resistance in its focus in Western Cambodia. She is also an active member of Malaria Eradication Research Agenda (malERA) an international consultative initiative aimed at identifying current knowledge gaps and new tools needed for malaria eradication. She is now developing mathematical models to be used as tools for national and international malaria elimination strategy design in the Asia-Pacific region. A large part of this approach will be to build capacity in the region for performing mathematical modelling research and for policymakers to access these new human resources effectively.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Francois Van Loggerenberg

Refreshments provided - please arrive early

Fri 3 Jun 2016 from 13:00 to 14:00

Tropical Medicine Global Health Seminars

NDM Building, Basement Seminar Room, Catering provided so please arrive promptly - First come, first served, Headington OX3 7FZ

A round-trip journey developing evidence-based guidelines for Kenyan children with indrawing pneumonia

Dr. Ambrose Agweyu

More about the topic: The presentation will begin with a comparison of the World Health Organization (WHO) recommendations for empirical treatment of childhood pneumonia pre-2013 and post-2013, along with the rationale supporting the change from injectable to oral antibiotics for indrawing... Read more

More about the topic: The presentation will begin with a comparison of the World Health Organization (WHO) recommendations for empirical treatment of childhood pneumonia pre-2013 and post-2013, along with the rationale supporting the change from injectable to oral antibiotics for indrawing pneumonia. Ambrose will then describe the initial rejection of the proposed new recommendation by national expert panel in Kenya illustrating the position of policy makers in many other regions of sub-Saharan Africa. A clinical trial conducted to address the gaps in evidence that emerged from concerns raised by the Kenyan policy makers is then presented. The talk ends by revisiting the recommendation initially proposed to Kenyan guideline panelist alongside the new local evidence. More about the speaker: Ambrose is a Kenyan paediatrician with Masters training in epidemiology, based at the KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research Programme in Nairobi. Working closely with the Kenyan Ministry of Health in 2009, his early research involved conducting systematic reviews for a national exercise to adapt the World Health Organization paediatric clinical practice guidelines using the GRADE methodology. Following this, Ambrose was invited to support similar exercises in Uganda and Rwanda. More recently, he was the principal investigator on a large pragmatic clinical trial comparing antibiotic treatments for childhood pneumonia. The findings of this study contributed towards a recent major revision in the Kenyan guidelines, and are likely to eventually influence practice in the region. As he approaches the end of his PhD training, he is currently considering future areas of work that build on his interest in conducting pragmatic trials for interventions to improve the care and outcomes of hospitalized children in sub-Saharan Africa.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Francois Van Loggerenberg

Thu 9 Jun 2016 from 12:30 to 13:30

Tropical Medicine Global Health Seminars

NDM Building, Basement Seminar Room, Catering provided so please arrive promptly - First come, first served, Headington OX3 7FZ

Pay for performance in health systems: Theory, evidence and case studies

Professor Richard Scheffler

Professor Scheffler will provide a conceptual framework that shows how pay for performance works in health. Then he will present the results of a survey on pay for performance in Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) countries. Finally, Dr. Scheffler will discuss the results... Read more

Professor Scheffler will provide a conceptual framework that shows how pay for performance works in health. Then he will present the results of a survey on pay for performance in Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) countries. Finally, Dr. Scheffler will discuss the results of selected case studies on P4P and end with a discussion of what the benefits and limitations are for using pay for performance in health.

Audience: Members of the University only

Organisers: Dr Francois van Loggerenberg