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On 12 Feb 2019, Professor Arjen Dondorp published a new book: Sepsis Management in Resource-limited Settings. The result of a 3-year project led by MORU and the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine (ESICM), the book was written by critical care physicians from around the globe.

Researcher in a hospital

Coordinated by honorary MORU member Marcus Schultz, Professor of Intensive Care Medicine in Amsterdam, with Martin Dünser, an intensivist from Austria, and Arjen Dondorp, Head of Malaria and Critical Illness (MORU), Sepsis Management in Resource-limited Settings critically evaluates the “surviving sepsis campaign” guidelines and adapts these for hospitals in resource-limited settings with constraints in human and material resources and examines the different causes of sepsis in the tropical world.

Sepsis guidelines from high-income settings are often not applicable to resource-limited settings because of differences in human and material resources and causes of sepsis. Systematic reviews of evidence generated in resource-poor settings, supplemented by the experiences from authors working in these settings provide a rich source of practical advice for the management of severe sepsis. A wide range of topics are covered in the 10 chapters of the book.

With support from the Wellcome Trust the book has been published in open access format by Springer. The authors hope it will be used widely.

In the foreword, Sir Jeremy Farrar, director of the Wellcome Trust, says: “This book, authored by people all looking after patients with sepsis today, is inspiring; a brilliant summary of what is known, how to best apply what is known wherever you work; and a pleasure to read whatever your personal experience or qualifications.”

Please join us in congratulating Arjen, Martin and Marcus for this important achievement!

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