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The Crossing Boundaries III forum on health systems research got off to an exciting start with a good number of guests in attendance. The two-day forum provided useful insights in ongoing research in low and middle income countries. Some of the topics discussed were on were on task shifting, interdisciplinary research methods, antimicrobial resistance, mental health and governance amongst others.

Attendees in a talk

The crossing boundaries III forum on health systems research at the Green Templeton College in Oxford, got off to an exciting start with a good number of guests in attendance. The two - day results dissemination and sharing forum provided useful insights and inputs in ongoing research in low and middle income countries. These studies have the potential impact of improving care for sick newborns and neonates and latest findings from the HSD-N research programme, identified current coverage and gaps in the care of newborns/neonatal services in Kenya.

The project is led by Professor Mike English and Dr Georgina Murphy via the KemriWellcome Trust in Nairobi and from their base at Nuffied Department of Medicine and the University of Oxford. Findings from this meeting focused on and the role of nursing in neonatal care provision, gaps in nursing numbers and potential solutions. Topics discussed were on task shifting, interdisciplinary research methods, antimicrobial resistance, mental health and governance amongst others. The two-day meeting was from the 4-5th of December 2017.

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