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In partnership with the Wellcome Innovations Flagship Programme, MORU launched its Critical Care Asia Network project with its first investigators’ meeting on 19-20 Aug in Bangkok. The project will establish an Asian ICU network across 42 ICUs in nine countries and implement a setting-adapted electronic registry.

Group photo of Critical care workshop attendees

Using the registry as well as qualitative methods, this project will evaluate the quality of critical care within the network, which will then lead into locally-led quality improvement interventions aiming to improve ICU performance and patient outcomes.

Building on methodology developed by our partners in Sri Lanka, Pakistan and India, the electronic registry will provide epidemiological data and map processes of care, involving caregivers and patients and family members. This will be complemented by qualitative evaluations of care processes, with the aim to empower healthcare teams to identify targets for improvement. Quality improvement interventions and research will be driven by priorities set by the network collaborators. The project works in close collaboration with the Flagship project lead by the OUCRU team on developing new low-cost technologies for ICUs in low/middle income countries. The network will also provide a platform for clinical trials planned for the next phase of the project. Follow the project on Twitter, as well via Rashan’s Twitter handle.

Above photo, collaborators at the Bangkok meeting (front row, from left): Dr Khamsay Detleuxay, Dr Nguyen Thien Binh, Dr Lakshmi Rangananthan, Dr Sophie Yacoub, Dr Rebecca Inglis, Dr Gyan Kayastha, Dr Mavuto Mukaka, Dr Victoria Adewole, Dr Louise Thwaites; (middle row): Dr Nguyen Thanh Nguyen , Dr Dong Phu Khiem, Dilanthi Gamage, Dr Lam Minh Yen, Dr Kathleen Thomas, Dr Bui Thi Hanh Duyen,  Dr Duong Bich Thuy, Dr Madiha Hashmi, Prof Ramani Moonesinghe, Dr Rozina Sultana, Abi Beane, Dr Syed Muhammad Muneeb Ali; (back row): Dr Arshad Taqi, Dr Dinh Minh Duc, Dr Rashan Haniffa, Dr Will Schilling, Ishara Udayanga, Prof. Marcus Schultz, Dr Swagata Tripathy, Prof Arjen M. Dondorp, Dr Muhammad Hayat, Dr Diptesh Aryal. Absent: Dr Steve Harris, Dr Bharath Kumar, Dr Jorge Salluh, Dr Meghan Lever, Dr Chris Pell, Dr Tamilarasu Kadhiravan, Dr Chairat Permpikul, Dr Ratapum Champunot, Dr Gentle Shrestha, Dr Rajyabardhan Pattnaik, Prof Guy Thwaites and Prof Yoell Lubell.

­- With thanks to Abi Beane for text and Jan Ariyalikit for photos

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