Cookies on this website

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Accept all cookies' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. If you click 'Reject all non-essential cookies' only necessary cookies providing core functionality such as security, network management, and accessibility will be enabled. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

In partnership with the Wellcome Innovations Flagship Programme, MORU launched its Critical Care Asia Network project with its first investigators’ meeting on 19-20 Aug in Bangkok. The project will establish an Asian ICU network across 42 ICUs in nine countries and implement a setting-adapted electronic registry.

Group photo of Critical care workshop attendees

Using the registry as well as qualitative methods, this project will evaluate the quality of critical care within the network, which will then lead into locally-led quality improvement interventions aiming to improve ICU performance and patient outcomes.

Building on methodology developed by our partners in Sri Lanka, Pakistan and India, the electronic registry will provide epidemiological data and map processes of care, involving caregivers and patients and family members. This will be complemented by qualitative evaluations of care processes, with the aim to empower healthcare teams to identify targets for improvement. Quality improvement interventions and research will be driven by priorities set by the network collaborators. The project works in close collaboration with the Flagship project lead by the OUCRU team on developing new low-cost technologies for ICUs in low/middle income countries. The network will also provide a platform for clinical trials planned for the next phase of the project. Follow the project on Twitter, as well via Rashan’s Twitter handle.

Above photo, collaborators at the Bangkok meeting (front row, from left): Dr Khamsay Detleuxay, Dr Nguyen Thien Binh, Dr Lakshmi Rangananthan, Dr Sophie Yacoub, Dr Rebecca Inglis, Dr Gyan Kayastha, Dr Mavuto Mukaka, Dr Victoria Adewole, Dr Louise Thwaites; (middle row): Dr Nguyen Thanh Nguyen , Dr Dong Phu Khiem, Dilanthi Gamage, Dr Lam Minh Yen, Dr Kathleen Thomas, Dr Bui Thi Hanh Duyen,  Dr Duong Bich Thuy, Dr Madiha Hashmi, Prof Ramani Moonesinghe, Dr Rozina Sultana, Abi Beane, Dr Syed Muhammad Muneeb Ali; (back row): Dr Arshad Taqi, Dr Dinh Minh Duc, Dr Rashan Haniffa, Dr Will Schilling, Ishara Udayanga, Prof. Marcus Schultz, Dr Swagata Tripathy, Prof Arjen M. Dondorp, Dr Muhammad Hayat, Dr Diptesh Aryal. Absent: Dr Steve Harris, Dr Bharath Kumar, Dr Jorge Salluh, Dr Meghan Lever, Dr Chris Pell, Dr Tamilarasu Kadhiravan, Dr Chairat Permpikul, Dr Ratapum Champunot, Dr Gentle Shrestha, Dr Rajyabardhan Pattnaik, Prof Guy Thwaites and Prof Yoell Lubell.

­- With thanks to Abi Beane for text and Jan Ariyalikit for photos

Similar stories

Meta-analysis informed the updated WHO guidelines for treatment of uncomplicated malaria in the first trimester of pregnancy

A new WWARN meta-analysis, commissioned by the World Health Organization and which informed a change to its treatment guidelines, has been published in The Lancet. The study provides compelling evidence that artemether-lumefantrine should now replace quinine as the treatment of choice in the first trimester.

Combating drug-resistant malaria

MORU research has contributed to strategies to eliminate malaria in the Greater Mekong Sub-region, helping to prevent the spread of drug-resistant malaria and improving health provision and outcomes for remote communities.

Study shows clear link between antibiotic treatment and acquisition of AMR bacteria in children

A study of the genetic diversity of Streptococcus pneumoniae, the bacterium responsible for hundreds of thousands of infant deaths each year, found that deep sequencing whole pneumococcal populations gave unsurpassed sensitivity for detecting multiple colonisations and was twice as effective at detecting invasive virulent strains of the bacteria as current best methods, say researchers in a study published in Nature Microbiology.

Antimalarial chemoprophylaxis for forest goers could help accelerate malaria elimination in Cambodia

Giving people antimalarials during and after visiting the forest reduced their risk of contracting malaria 6-fold, and could be the missing piece towards eliminating malaria in Asia-Pacific and South America, say Mahidol and Oxford University researchers in a study published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases.

Four CTMGH researchers awarded full professorships

We are delighted to announce that four of our researchers have been awarded the title of Professor, in recognition of their research achievements, contribution to teaching, and contribution to the general work of the Nuffield Department of Medicine, University of Oxford.

INTERBIO-21st study findings could help predict infants at risk of obesity

Fetal abdomen growth and the mother’s blood fat metabolites very early in pregnancy influence a child’s weight, body fat, vision and neurodevelopment at 2 years of age