Cookies on this website

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Accept all cookies' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. If you click 'Reject all non-essential cookies' only necessary cookies providing core functionality such as security, network management, and accessibility will be enabled. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

This public engagement project in Battambang Province, western Cambodia, was co-organised by the Mahidol Oxford Tropical Medicine Research Unit and the Cambodian National Malaria Control Programme. Drama and music are used as a means of communication to encourage people to get early diagnosis and treatment, to use insecticide treated bednets, and to raise awareness about the risks of malaria.

Countries in Southeast Asia are working towards the elimination of falciparum malaria. In Cambodia, malaria is in decline but malaria parasites, resistant to most treatments have emerged. Rapid elimination is now a matter of urgency. In western Cambodia, most malaria infections occur in rural areas, among people working in forests. An existing village malaria worker programme provides early free diagnosis and treatment. Unfortunately, the people at most risk of malaria are also the hardest to reach with health services and health education. In the Battambang Province, health authorities, in partnership with the Mahidol Oxford Tropical Medicine Research Programme, have organised a series of drama and music workshops in twenty villages. These are remote villages of a few hundred people with very little infrastructure or modern entertainment. The message of the drama and the songs is to encourage people to get early diagnosis and treatment from the village malaria workers, to prevent mosquito bites by using insecticide treated nets, and to raise awareness about the risk from malaria in local forests. We chose drama as a means of communication and education because traditional Cambodian drama is popular in rural communities and it attracts very large audiences. It is fun, gets the villagers involved, and appeals to people who might otherwise not receive health education.

Similar stories

OUCRU presents a new virtual exhibition: Digital Diaries, Voices from the Pandemic, COVID-19 experiences in Asia

This online exhibition showcases short films and photographs created by health-care workers and community members and documents the socio-cultural impact of the COVID-19 pandemic in Indonesia, Nepal and Vietnam.

Four CTMGH researchers awarded full professorships

We are delighted to announce that four of our researchers have been awarded the title of Professor, in recognition of their research achievements, contribution to teaching, and contribution to the general work of the Nuffield Department of Medicine, University of Oxford.

INTERBIO-21st study findings could help predict infants at risk of obesity

Fetal abdomen growth and the mother’s blood fat metabolites very early in pregnancy influence a child’s weight, body fat, vision and neurodevelopment at 2 years of age

Using mathematical modelling to fight malaria

Researchers have created a mathematical model to predict genetic resistance to antimalarial drugs in Africa to manage one of the biggest threats to global malarial control.

MORU hepatitis work focusses on preventing mother-to-child transmission, high-at-risk populations, and remote communities

MORU Tropical Health Network researchers in Southeast Asia study various aspects of hepatitis B and C, infections that can lead to chronic liver diseases, and complications like liver cancer or cirrhosis. Researchers at MOCRU work on treatment for hepatitis C, a frequent opportunistic infection in HIV patients. MORU’s Clinical Pharmacology conducts two trials on possible treatments of hepatitis C. Hepatitis B is frequently transmitted from mother to child at birth, and SMRU researchers study mothers’ knowledge and behaviour, as well as prevention.

Incomplete reporting of COVID-19 disease severity criteria compromises meta-analysis

Patients affected by COVID-19 should be treated according to the severity of their disease. However, not all key national or international organisations define severity in the same way. This imprecision in severity assessment compromises the validity of some therapeutic recommendations. Using individual patient data would better guide and improve therapeutic recommendations for COVID-19.