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The feasibility of using a sensitive polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to evaluate malaria vaccines in small group sizes was tested in 102 adult Gambian volunteers who received either the malaria vaccine regimen FP9 ME-TRAP/MVA ME-TRAP or rabies vaccine. All volunteers received the antimalarial drugs primaquine and Lapdap plus artesunate to eliminate malaria parasites. Volunteers in a further group received an additional single treatment with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) to prevent new infections. There was substantially lower T-cell immunogenicity than in previous trials with this vaccine regimen and no protection against infection in the malaria vaccine group. Using the primary endpoint of 20 parasites per mL, no difference was found in the prevalence of low-level infections in volunteers who received SP compared with those who did not, indicating that SP did not reduce the incidence of very low-density infection. However, SP markedly reduced the incidence of higher density infections. These findings support the feasibility and potential of this approach to screen pre-erythrocytic vaccines for efficacy against infection in small numbers of vaccinees in endemic areas.

Type

Journal article

Journal

The American journal of tropical medicine and hygiene

Publication Date

03/2007

Volume

76

Pages

486 - 493

Addresses

Medical Research Council Laboratories, Fajara, The Gambia. ebimoukhuede@hotmail.co.uk

Keywords

Humans, Parasitemia, Malaria, Malaria Vaccines, Vaccination, Sensitivity and Specificity, Polymerase Chain Reaction, Adolescent, Adult, Middle Aged