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© 2014, BMJ Publishing Group. All rights reserved. Aim: To determine whether, after the Emergency Triage, Assessment and Treatment plus Admission (ETAT+) course, a comprehensive paediatric life support course, final year medical undergraduates in Rwanda would achieve a high level of knowledge and practical skills and if these were retained. To guide further course development, student feedback was obtained. Methods: Longitudinal cohort study of knowledge and skills of all final year medical undergraduates at the University of Rwanda in academic year 2011-2012 who attended a 5-day ETAT+ course. Students completed a precourse knowledge test. Knowledge and clinical skills assessments, using standardised marking, were performed immediately postcourse and 3-9 months later. Feedback was obtained using printed questionnaires. Results: 84 students attended the course and reevaluation. Knowledge test showed a significant improvement, from median 47% to 71% correct answers (p < 0.001). For two clinical skills scenarios, 98% passed both scenarios, 37% after a retake, 2% failed both scenarios. Three to nine months later, students were reevaluated, median score for knowledge test 67%, not significantly different from postcourse (p > 0.1). For clinical skills, 74% passed, with 32% requiring a retake, 8% failed after retake, 18% failed both scenarios, a significant deterioration (p < 0.0001). Conclusions Students performed well on knowledge and skills immediately after a comprehensive ETAT+ course. Knowledge was maintained 3-9 months later. Clinical skills, which require detailed sequential steps, declined, but most were able to perform them satisfactorily after feedback. The course was highly valued, but several short courses and more practical teaching were advocated.

Original publication

DOI

10.1136/archdischild-2014-306078

Type

Journal article

Journal

Archives of Disease in Childhood

Publication Date

01/11/2014

Volume

99

Pages

993 - 997