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Sandra Adele

DPhil Student in Clinical Medicine

Sandra is currently reading for a DPhil in Clinical Medicine and is a member of Christ Church College and the Junior Dean of Exeter College. Her background is in Neuroscience, Pharmacology and Global Health and her research focuses on the role of T cells in Infectious diseases such as COVID-19. She is currently looking at SARS-CoV-2 T cell responses induced by vaccines and natural infection as well as responses to the emerging variants of concern. 

Education:

MSc Pharmacology, University of Oxford.

MSc International Health and Tropical Medicine, University of Oxford.

THESIS TITLE:

Characterizing the T cell response to SARS-CoV-2 induced by natural infection and vaccines.

PUBLICATIONS AND OTHER ACHIEVEMENTS 2019-22

SARS-CoV-2 Omicron-B. 1.1. 529 leads to widespread escape from neutralizing antibody responses.

Dejnirattisai, Wanwisa, et al, (2022), Cell 2021.

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Immunogenicity of standard and extended dosing intervals of BNT162b2 mRNA vaccine. 

Payne, Rebecca P. et al, (2021), Cell 184.23 5699-5714.

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Vaccine-induced immunity provides more robust heterotypic immunity than natural infection to emerging SARS-CoV-2 variants of concern.  

Skelly D, et al, Nature Communications 12, 5061 (2021)                                                                             _________________________________________

Adele S. et al, (2020) Integrating Neglected Tropical Diseases into Universal Health Coverage. n.d.2020

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Institute for Health Metrics and Evalution (IHME). S. Adele COVID-19 and Malaria.2020           

Adele Sandra. One size does not fit all. Personalised Medicine. Oxford Scientist