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Visit the Radcliffe Science Library before 4th January 2019 to see a new art exhibition of 14 prints illustrating the global health impact of poor quality medicines. The proliferation of poor quality medicines is an important but neglected public health problem, threatening millions of people all over the world, both in developing and wealthy countries.

Visitors attending the exhibition

The original artworks were created by several artists from Southeast Asia, the print exhibition was recently presented at the first ever ‘Medicine Quality and Public Health’ international conference, organised by the Infectious Diseases Data Observatory, the Centre for Tropical Medicine & Global Health, the Mahidol-Oxford Research Unit at the University of Oxford and the Global Public Health Program of the United States Pharmacopeia.

The full story is available on the IDDO website

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