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Oxford University Clinical Research Unit-Nepal (OUCRU-NP) is hosted by Patan Hospital and the Patan Academy of Health Sciences in Kathmandu Nepal and works in close collaboration with the Nepal Health Research Council at the Nepalese Ministry of Health and Population. Our mission is to build a strong critical mass of young Nepalese clinician scientists who can help build Nepal's scientific and clinical future.

Oucru nepal 2018

OUCRU-NP was initiated in the summer of 2003 following a visit to Nepal by Professor Jeremy Farrar after an exchange of letters with Dr Buddha Basnyat (Consultant, Patan Hospital) in the New England Journal of Medicine, subsequent to a review article by Professor Farrar and colleagues on typhoid fever.

Since 2003, the research collaboration has evolved and OUCRU-NP has become a respected and integral part of the work of both the Patan Hospital and the Patan Academy of Health Sciences. There has been considerable investment in upgrading the hospital laboratories including Microbiology and now Biochemistry, Heamatology and Pathology, in the Clinical Research Unit and in the training of young Nepalese clinicians and scientists. Our main research focus has been on the most common infectious diseases affecting patients at Patan Hospital and in the surrounding areas of Lalipitur.  We have a major focus on enteric fever (Typhoid and Paratyphoid) and other causes of febrile illness including typhus, infections of the central nervous system and Hepatitis E.  We plan in the future to expand this work to include viral causes of pneumonia, TB, emerging illnesses and other public health priorities in Nepal. High altitude sickness in Nepalese and travellers has also been an interest of this collaboration over the last ten years.

Every year thousands of pilgrims visit religious sites in the mountains of Nepal. Many of these local pilgrims are unaware of the dangers of climbing to high altitudes and many succumb to altitude related illnesses. Some even die on the mountains. The Himalayan Rescue Association, OUCRU Public Engagement and Media for Development worked together with the pilgrim community to create a public health film to inform others of the challenges of these journeys.

Our team

Latest news

Picturing health: dengue in Vietnam published in The Lancet

Earlier this year, OUCRU Photographer in Residence Pearl Gan conducted a project focusing on dengue. In that project, she took photos of dengue patients and health care workers at the Hospital for Tropical Diseases in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. She also took photos of dengue patients in their homes and at research sites in the city. This project was funded by the Wellcome Trust, and this week selected photos from that project have been published in The Lancet as a photo story.

The practice and ethics of participatory visual methods for community engagement in public health and health science

Mary Chambers (OUCRU Public Engagement Vietnam) and Gill Black (Sustainable Livelihood Foundation, South Africa) have partnered with The Global Health Network training centre to published this online course and handbook

Pearl Gan, photographer in residence at OUCRU in Vietnam and EOCRU in Indonesia wins FIGO's 2019 photo competition

A mother and her baby leave a Puskesmas - a government-mandated primary care clinic - in West Java, Indonesia, following a check-up. The woman smiles, as the infant stares out from the safety of a bright sarong wrap. This quiet moment of active participation in their own health and well-being is the realisation of a fundamental human right. WHO’s vision for primary health care in the 21st century is to ensure the highest possible level of health and well-being, with equitable distribution.

OUCRU Nepal Research Highlights

Melioidosis: misdiagnosed in Nepal

Posted 02/04/2019: Underdiagnosed in South Asia, melioidosis is caused by a bacterium called Burkholderia pseudomallei which is often referred to as a remarkable imitator. Pulmonary involvement including infections mimicking tuberculosis is a common form of presentation. In this case report, Buddha Basnyat and colleagues show that if a South Asian patient does not respond to anti tuberculosis treatment, melioidosis should be considered.

Clinical recommendations for high altitude exposure of individuals with pre-existing cardiovascular conditions

Posted 19/06/2018. Many people with pre-existing heart problems (including heart attack, pacemaker implantation, arrhythmia), high blood pressure and even past history of a stroke seek advice regarding high altitude travel ( > 2500m) for recreation, meetings or pilgrimages. Dr Buddha Basnyat and colleagues succinctly try to address these conditions at altitude and make reasonable recommendations in the face of limited data.

Prophylactic acetaminophen or ibuprofen result in equivalent acute mountain sickness incidence at high altitude

Posted 30/06/2017. Acute mountain sickness is a potentially life-threatening illness for sojourners to high altitude (> 2500m). Where pharmacological prophylaxis is indicated, Diamox is the drug of choice, but it has distressing side-effects. This Everest-based, double-blind, randomized controlled trial revealed that paracetamol, like ibuprofen, could potentially replace Diamox for prophylaxis.

Treatment Response in Enteric Fever in an Era of Increasing Antimicrobial Resistance

Posted 25/04/2017. South Asia, which includes Nepal, is a hub for typhoid fever. Trials conducted in Nepal since 2005 confirm that fluoroquinolones are failing for typhoid fever treatment. The WHO and health ministries in the region recommend fluroquionolones as the drugs of choice for typhoid fever. This recommendation needs to be changed.