Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

A photo from Pearl Gan, Photographer In Residence for OUCRU, was selected for The Lancet Highlights 2018. The picture shows Senior Nurse Shikh Rema changing the dressing for Jabeda Begom, a 65-year-old woman with leprosy, at the Jalchatra Hospital in Bangladesh. Treatment of leprosy is a lengthy process, but thanks to dedicated staff, patients are given the care and attention they need.

Nurse with a patient © Credit: Pearl Gan

View winning photos in The Lancet

"My goal is to help in raising awareness of world issues around me. This leprosy photo published in the Lancet was taken in Jalchatra hospital in Bangladesh. I had encountered many problems in this Dhaka trip. It was a life-altering experience for me. I was lucky to have escaped student riots which had frozen the city of Dhaka. I was caught in the unrest and encountered streets being locked down; was holed up for hours, waiting to be saved. Another time, I was trapped in a car while hundreds of students marched down the street with big weapons in their hands. I really had to thank my lucky star for escaping unscathed.

Political unrest was not something we encountered everyday in our life. But to have good memories coming out from a bad experience, that itself definitely deserved a toast. I will never take life for granted after this trip. It is going to take a while to recover from this traumatic trip but the winning photograph is definitely a recognition of my work and I sincerely thanked Professor Kevin Baird and Dr Mary Chambers for believing in me. "

Similar stories

Risks of serious adverse events following treatment for visceral leishmaniasis

OCGHR Publication Research

This large-scale systematic review and meta-analysis aimed to collate all reported serious adverse events in visceral leishmaniasis clinical trials and quantify the incidence of mortality during the first 30 days of therapy. The analyses, which included clinical data from more than 35,000 patients, found that mortality following treatment was an extremely rare event and serious adverse events following treatments were poorly reported.

Researchers call for access to Ivermectin for young children

OCGHR Publication Research

Millions of children weighing less than 15kg are currently denied access to Ivermectin treatment due to insufficient safety data being available to support a change to the current label indication. The WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network’s new meta-analysis provides evidence that supports removing this barrier and improving treatment equity.

Gender imbalance in visceral leishmaniasis clinical trials

OCGHR Publication Research

Researchers have found that despite an ongoing trend for a decreasing proportion of males being enrolled in antileishmanial therapeutic efficacy trials over time, there are still 1.8 times as many males as females involved in clinical trials. A new systematic review and meta-analysis suggests that existing knowledge on drug efficacy is derived from a study population that is heavily skewed towards adult males. At the same time, substantially less is known about the optimal treatment response in female patients.

World’s largest clinical trial for COVID-19 treatments expands internationally

EOCRU OCGHR OUCRU OUCRU-Nepal Research

The Randomised Evaluation of COVID-19 Therapy (RECOVERY) Trial, the world’s largest clinical trial for COVID-19 treatments, has now expanded internationally with Indonesia and Nepal among the first countries to join. The first patients have been recruited to RECOVERY International.

Evidence supports WHO recommendation for primaquine combined with ACTs to block Plasmodium falciparum transmission

OCGHR Publication Research

Evidence from a new study, initiated by the Primaquine Roll Out Group and conducted at WWARN, supports the World Health Organization (WHO) recommendation for use of 0.25mg/kg dose of primaquine (PQ) combined with artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACT) to block Plasmodium falciparum transmission.

Indonesia’s decision to prioritise COVID-19 vaccination to citizens aged 18-59 years old questionable

EOCRU MORU OUCRU

The Indonesian government policy to exclude the elderly in the first phase of the COVID-19 vaccination program could hinder the vaccine’s impact in lowering mortality rates. COVID-19 mortality rates in Indonesia, the highest in Southeast Asia, are dominated by those in the 60 years and above age bracket. In this article published in The Conversation, Kartika Saraswati and fellow DPhil students elaborate how, by prioritising vaccination for elderly, Indonesia may optimally reduce the hospital burden and COVID-19 deaths amidst a limited vaccine supply during the first vaccination phase.