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KWTRP uses magnet theatre for community engagement

KWTRP uses magnet theatre for community engagement

KWTRP Public Engagement

KWTRP Community Liaison Group is working with the Jukwaa Arts Productions using a magnet theatre model to sensitize the communities/publics within Kilifi County about the Research work undertaken at the programme, and to learn about community/public concerns.

Joint statement to share data relevant to the Ebola outbreak in the DRC

Joint statement to share data relevant to the Ebola outbreak in the DRC

@Oxford Research

The Infectious Disease Data Observatory and The Global Health Network have signed a Wellcome joint statement, along with the Gates Foundation, Lancet, PLOS and others, to help ensure data on the current Ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo is free to access and shared rapidly.

Ebola outbreak – this time it’s different

Ebola outbreak – this time it’s different

@Oxford Research

Lessons learned from past Ebola epidemics are helping to combat a fresh outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). Investing in new vaccines, diagnostic tests and laboratories is paying off as expert networks spring into action.

Professor Rose McGready recognised by the American Society of Tropical Medicine & Hygiene

Professor Rose McGready recognised by the American Society of Tropical Medicine & Hygiene

Awards & Appointments MORU

ASTMH nominated Professor Rose McGready, SMRU Deputy Director, as an Honorary International Fellow. Rose received the prestigious award in recognition of outstanding accomplishment by an “individual not an American citizen who has made eminent contributions to some phase of tropical medicine and hygiene”. Rose will formally receive her award at the ASTMH Annual Meeting, to be help 28 Oct-1 Nov in New Orleans, Louisiana.

Satellite images cut survey costs and help identify hard-to-reach populations

Satellite images cut survey costs and help identify hard-to-reach populations

@Oxford Research

Collecting representative survey data on large populations of people can be a very time-consuming and expensive undertaking. But it doesn’t have to be. Marco J. Haenssgen and Ern Charoenboon explain how they have used freely available satellite images to survey hard-to-reach communities in Thailand and Laos.

Experts to seek consensus on tackling poor quality medicines

Experts to seek consensus on tackling poor quality medicines

@Oxford Conferences & meetings

The proliferation of poor quality medical products is an important but neglected public health problem, threatening millions of people all over the world, both in developing and wealthy countries. A pioneering conference will bring leading professionals from all over the world to Oxford, September 23-28, to discuss strategies for tackling poor quality medical products on a global scale.

Small children and pregnant women may be underdosed with widely used antimalarial drug

Small children and pregnant women may be underdosed with widely used antimalarial drug

MORU Publication Research

Current recommended treatment regimens for the most widely used medicine for uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria may be sub-optimal for small children and pregnant women according to a study led by Professor Joel Tarning.

Safety doubts unwarranted, important anti-malarial drug DHA-PPQ is safe to use

Safety doubts unwarranted, important anti-malarial drug DHA-PPQ is safe to use

MORU Publication Research

One of the world’s most widely used anti-malarial drugs is safe to use, say researchers, after a thorough review and analysis of nearly 200,000 malaria patients who’d taken the drug dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine (DHA-PPQ). There is such a low risk of sudden unexpected death from DHA-PPQ, one of the world’s most effective medicines to treat malaria, that there is no need to limit its current use.

Old drug, new role – eLife podcast

Old drug, new role – eLife podcast

OUCRU Publication Research

Aspirin helps increase survival from TB meningitis by reducing brain inflammation and preventing the disease from blocking blood vessels in the brain that cause parts of the brain to die, commonly called ‘stroke’.

Tackling poor quality medicines

Tackling poor quality medicines

MORU Research

In this Science Blog published on Oxford University website, Prof Paul Newton, Head of the Medicine Quality Group at the Infectious Diseases Data Observatory (IDDO) and the MORU Tropical Health Network and NDM Professor of Tropical Medicine i, explains the need for new strategies for tackling poor quality medical products.

New age-based regimen for single low-dose primaquine to block malaria transmission

New age-based regimen for single low-dose primaquine to block malaria transmission

MORU Publication Research

Primaquine can be used to prevent the transmission of falciparum malaria from human to mosquito. Bob Taylor and colleagues at the Mahidol Oxford Research Unit (MORU) have developed an age-based regimen for single low-dose primaquine to block the transmission of malaria in sub-Saharan Africa.

Medicine Quality & Public Health Conference

Medicine Quality & Public Health Conference

@Oxford Conferences & meetings MORU

The first-ever dedicated academic conference to discuss Medicine Quality & Public Health bringing together people from a diversity of sectors: public health, national regulatory authority, pharmacy, biomedical, chemistry, law, ethics, cultural and social sciences, the pharmaceutical industry, international organisations, NGOs, national procurement centres, also scientists working on internet and pharmaceutical forensics. 23rd-28th September 2018 at Keble College, Oxford. Submit your abstract by 1 June 2018

Genetics sheds light on the spread of TB bacteria

Genetics sheds light on the spread of TB bacteria

OUCRU Publication Research

In a first of its kind study into the population and spread of tuberculosis-causing (TB) bacteria in Ho Chi Minh City, Thuong Thuong Nguyn and collegues at OUCRU Vietnam, Australia, UK and Singapore have found that more than half of cases can be attributed to one particular strain of the bacteria.

Rose McGready awarded Alumni Award for Service to Humanity

Rose McGready awarded Alumni Award for Service to Humanity

Awards & Appointments MORU

On 10 May 2018, SMRU Deputy Director Rose McGready was awarded the Alumni Award for Service to Humanity by the University of Sydney. The Alumni Award recognizes the personal contribution of alumni who, through service to philanthropy, improve the lives of those in need. It also seeks to recognize the significant involvement of Sydney alumni in projects that enrich local or international communities.

Using management thinking to fight the superbug crisis

Using management thinking to fight the superbug crisis

@Oxford Publication Research

Dr Marco J Haenssgen discusses the application of management thinking to solving the growing global problem of antimicrobial resistance.

Guy Thwaites elected Fellow of the Academy of Medical Sciences

Guy Thwaites elected Fellow of the Academy of Medical Sciences

Seven Oxford scientists are amongst 48 of the UK's world-leading researchers elected to join the prestigious Fellowship of the Academy of Medical Sciences this year. Fellows are elected for their outstanding contributions to biomedical and health science, leading research discoveries, and translating developments into benefits for patients and the wider society.

Professor Dominic Kwiatkowski joins the Fellowship of the Royal Society

Professor Dominic Kwiatkowski joins the Fellowship of the Royal Society

@Oxford Awards & Appointments

The Royal Society recognises Professor Dominic Kwiatkowski’s pioneering work on malaria, and particularly the use of genomic epidemiology to understand the evolutionary arms race that is going on between human, parasite and mosquito populations in Africa and other tropical regions of the world. Professor Kwiatkowski joins an existing membership of approximately 1600 of the most distinguished scientists from the United Kingdom, other Commonwealth countries and the Republic of Ireland.

Getting rid of malaria possible, if we try something new, say experts

Getting rid of malaria possible, if we try something new, say experts

MORU Publication Research

The rapid elimination of potentially untreatable P. falciparum malaria in South-East Asia is possible, according to a ground-breaking new study published today in The Lancet. The study authors say that setting up community-based malaria clinics for early diagnosis, treatment and monitoring, combined with mass antimalarial drug administration (MDA) to everyone living in ‘hotspot’ areas.

To defeat superbugs, everyone will need access to clean water

To defeat superbugs, everyone will need access to clean water

OUCRU

While many LMICs still lack appropriate access to antibiotics, a global increase is driven largely by some developing countries which face more drug-resistant infections. To tackle antimicrobial resistance, we need to look at all the factors behind how and when antibiotics are used. A common obstacle is lack of access to clean water, which makes preventing and controlling infections nearly impossible.

Malaria parasites present in 23% of donor blood in African countries

Malaria parasites present in 23% of donor blood in African countries

@Oxford Research

Almost one in four blood bank supplies in certain regions of Africa may have malaria parasites in them. UK scientists reviewed 26 studies that measured levels of Plasmodium parasites among blood donors in sub-Saharan Africa between 2000 and 2017. Percentages varied greatly across the nine countries included in the study, ranging from 0% to as much as 74%, with an average of 23.46% tested positive.

The frontline fight against deadly malaria parasites threatening a new global emergency

The frontline fight against deadly malaria parasites threatening a new global emergency

MORU Research Video

ITV News has travelled across the world to report on the growing global threat of the spread of deadly drug-resistant 'super bugs'. In the first of their three-part series, they investigate the frontline fight against deadly malaria parasites in South East Asia threatening a new global emergency.

UK to fund MORU study to develop two new, safe malaria treatments

UK to fund MORU study to develop two new, safe malaria treatments

MORU Research

18 April 2018 (London) – The United Kingdom’s Department for International Development (DFID) announced that it will commit £9.2 million (USD 13.15 million) of research funding to DeTACT (Development of Triple Artemisinin Combination Therapies), a large multi-centre trial in 5 Asian and 10 African countries that aims to develop two new safe and effective malaria treatments using combinations of existing antimalarial drugs.

Commonwealth nations pledge £2.7bn to halt deadly resurgence of malaria

Commonwealth nations pledge £2.7bn to halt deadly resurgence of malaria

General

Investments worth more than £2.7bn are being pledged today in a drive to halve the number of malaria cases across the Commonwealth. Heads of state and business leaders are convening in London to galvanise the fight against the disease, which has seen a resurgence in some areas.

UK government announces further support in the fight against malaria

UK government announces further support in the fight against malaria

MORU Research

As the second largest international donor, the UK has been at the forefront of efforts to reduce the number of cases for many years by investing in treatment, prevention and research, including the fight against the threat of drug resistance. The UK has announced further support for the fight against malaria to save more than 120,000 lives ahead of a Malaria Summit tomorrow with Commonwealth leaders.

The town that breeds resistance to Malaria drugs

The town that breeds resistance to Malaria drugs

MORU Research

Pailin, a small settlement nestling in tropical rainforest near Cambodia’s border with Thailand, lies at the heart of a region that has seen successive waves of resistance to malaria drugs arise in local people and then spread across the globe. As new waves of the disease threaten our health, worried scientists want to conduct a mass inoculation in a Cambodian region where new vaccines always seem to stop being effective.

Paracetamol protects kidney in severe malaria patients

Paracetamol protects kidney in severe malaria patients

MORU Publication Research

Giving paracetamol (acetaminophen) to patients ill with severe malaria made them less likely to develop potentially fatal kidney failure. Each year severe malaria causes close to half a million deaths globally. Acute kidney injury occurs in 40% of adults and at least 10% of children with severe malaria, killing an estimated 40% of these adults and 12-24% of the children. The study reported for the first time that giving regular doses of paracetamol protects the kidney in adult patients with severe falciparum malaria.

Making malaria visible

Making malaria visible

OUCRU Publication

Professor Kevin Baird, Head of EOCRU in Jakarta, Indonesia, talks about how more needs to be done to mitigate the threat of malaria in Asia Pacific. This article (p. 11 onwards) includes photos from Pearl Gan who travelled through the Asia Pacific region to capture the stories of people and communities impacted by malaria.

Prevention and treatment of acute malnutrition in emergencies and humanitarian crises

Prevention and treatment of acute malnutrition in emergencies and humanitarian crises

KWTRP Research

Together with Evidence Aid, Professor Jay Berkley from KWTRP is launching a process to get research into practice in humanitarian emergencies. Systematic reviews and teleconference meetings to discuss how clinical trials can inform programmes and practice are published online, with an editorial highlighting the issues and need for policies to be based on research evidence.

FIEBRE study kicks off; aims to reveal leading causes of fever and tackle AMR

FIEBRE study kicks off; aims to reveal leading causes of fever and tackle AMR

MORU Research

FIEBRE aims to design new evidence-based guidelines to manage fever, thereby ensuring that patients get drugs that give them the best chance of recovery, and thereby help stop the spread of antimicrobial resistance (AMR), a major global health problem.

ERGO is launching the African coaLition for Epidemic Research, Response and Training

ERGO is launching the African coaLition for Epidemic Research, Response and Training

@Oxford Event

ERGO is launching ALERRT, a multi-disciplinary consortium building a patient-centered clinical research network to respond to epidemics across sub-Saharan Africa. ALERRT aims to reduce the public health and socio-economic impact of disease outbreaks in sub-Saharan Africa by building a sustainable clinical and laboratory research preparedness and response network.

Village Drama Against Malaria in Cambodia

Village Drama Against Malaria in Cambodia

MORU Public Engagement

In collaboration with Cambodian authorities, MORU are running the Village Drama Against Malaria project for the third year. The project, which runs in 10 remote villages in March 2018, aims to create awareness about malaria prevention and early treatment.

Cultural barriers to tackling the superbug crisis

Cultural barriers to tackling the superbug crisis

@Oxford Publication Research

Research led by Dr Marco Haenssgen has revealed how the complex cultural and social environment in developing countries can complicate the use of new diagnostic technologies to fight the global superbug crisis.

Could aspirin be used to treat tuberculous meningitis?

Could aspirin be used to treat tuberculous meningitis?

OUCRU Publication Research

Science Blog. Professor Guy Thwaites, Director of the Oxford University Clinical Research Unit, Vietnam, explains the discovery of yet another use for one of the most ubiquitous and ancient of drugs – aspirin.

This disease kills half the people it infects. So why isn’t more being done?

This disease kills half the people it infects. So why isn’t more being done?

MORU Research

Melioidosis is a bacterial infection that quietly causes thousands of deaths each year. Meet Direk Limmathurotsakul, the doctor who made it his mission to make the world take notice.

Meet Puta-O, MOCRU’s most remote clinic

Meet Puta-O, MOCRU’s most remote clinic

MORU Research

Myanmar-Oxford Clinical Research Unit (MOCRU) and partner Medical Action Myanmar (MAM) are performing a scrub typhus survey among fever patients attending the Puta-O clinic, a small, picturesque, secluded town surrounded by snow-capped Himalayan foothills in the far north of Myanmar over 1,500 km from Yangon.

Salmonella and antibiotic residues found in meat in Vietnam

Salmonella and antibiotic residues found in meat in Vietnam

OUCRU Publication Research

Over two-thirds of meat samples from Ho Chi Minh City were found to contain Salmonella bacteria, according to a study by the Oxford University Clinical Research Unit (OUCRU). Researchers purchased 117 samples of chicken meat, beef and pork from retail sites in 2016-2017; 68.4% of those samples were found to contain Salmonella bacteria.

AfOx Visiting Fellows Program now open

AfOx Visiting Fellows Program now open

@Oxford

Applications are now being accepted for the AfOx Visiting Fellows Programme. This 4-6 weeks fellowship aims to facilitate collaborations, as well as foster research and teaching excellence in African institutions an the University of Oxford. Applicants must be residents of an African country and hold an appointment in an academic or research institution in an African country. Deadline 11th March 2018.

Join CHIFA for a global discussion on Newborn Care in Low- and Middle-Income Countries

Join CHIFA for a global discussion on Newborn Care in Low- and Middle-Income Countries

@Oxford Research

Who will step up during the next decade to implement and integrate life-saving interventions and services for newborns? Decision-making leading to the implementation of newborn health services and interventions within broader health programmes requires multiple actors and levels of involvement. We invite you to contribute to the next phase of the discussion.

Labels showing antibiotics used to produce food a must to fight drug-resistant superbugs	 Labels showing antibiotics used to produce food a must to fight drug-resistant superbugs

Labels showing antibiotics used to produce food a must to fight drug-resistant superbugs Labels showing antibiotics used to produce food a must to fight drug-resistant superbugs

MORU Publication Research

To fight the growing global threat of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, food labels around the world should include an ‘antibiotic footprint’ section that clearly shows the type and amount of antibiotics used to produce that food, say scientists in a study led by Associate Professor Direk Limmathurotsakul.

Mobile phones can worsen healthcare inequalities

Mobile phones can worsen healthcare inequalities

@Oxford Publication Research

The fast spread of mobile phones across low-income countries like India can make it harder for poorer people without phones to access essential health services, new research by Dr Marco Haenssgen suggests.

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