Cookies on this website

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Accept all cookies' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. If you click 'Reject all non-essential cookies' only necessary cookies providing core functionality such as security, network management, and accessibility will be enabled. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

Despite a long border with China and a population of 97 million people, Vietnam has recorded only just over 300 cases of Covid-19 and not a single death. The country very quickly enacted measures such as travel restrictions, monitoring and eventually closing border with China, closing schools and increasing health checks at borders and other vulnerable places. A vast and labour intensive contact tracing operation got under way. Quarantine on such a vast scale is key as evidence mounts that as many as half of all infected people are asymptomatic.

Coronavirus face masks © Credit De an Sun

How Vietnam managed to keep its coronavirus death toll at zero CNN interview with Guy Thwaites and Pham Quang Thai (former OUCRU PhD student), 30th May

BBC interview with Guy Thwaites, 15th May

Rappler Talk also interviewed Guy Thwaites on Vietnam’s effective strategy against coronavirus, 15th May

MANILA, Philippines, 15th May – Vietnam's handling of the coronavirus pandemic is perhaps the most efficient and effective, not just in Asia but in the whole world. While many countries are still reeling from the effects of the news virus, Vietnam came out of lockdown with only 288 cases and zero deaths.

Rappler editor-at-large Marites Vitug asked Guy Thwaites, OUCRU director since 2013 and expert on infectious diseases and microbiology, how Vietnam handled the coronavirus pandemic.

What can countries learn from Vietnam? And what's unique in its handling that proved to be an ace in the fight against the coronavirus pandemic?

Similar stories

OUCRU presents a new virtual exhibition: Digital Diaries, Voices from the Pandemic, COVID-19 experiences in Asia

This online exhibition showcases short films and photographs created by health-care workers and community members and documents the socio-cultural impact of the COVID-19 pandemic in Indonesia, Nepal and Vietnam.

World Hepatitis Day: OUCRU research seeks to lower cost of treatment and improve access to care for patients with hepatitis C

Today is World Hepatitis Day. OUCRU and hospitals in Ho Chi Minh City and Hanoi have been collaborating on hepatitis C clinical trials since 2018. Our research is centred around predictive factors for selecting persons who could be successfully treated with shorter durations of antiviral therapy. OUCRU’s social science and public engagement teams are currently working with underrepresented groups to create community-led strategies to link care and treatment for populations at risk for viral hepatitis. Our aim is to have a more significant impact on the treatment strategy and access to care for patients with hepatitis C in Vietnam and worldwide in the future.

Prof Guy Thwaites co-authored WHO’s report on antibacterial agents in preclinical & clinical development

OUCRU’s Director, Professor Guy Thwaites, has recently contributed to an analysis of antibacterial agents in preclinical and clinical development by the World Health Organisation (WHO), as part of the WHO advisory group on research and development of antibacterial treatments.

Dengue Research Article Awarded The 2021 – 2022 Alexandre Yersin Prize for Outstanding Publications

OUCRU research article titled ‘Combination of inflammatory and vascular markers in the febrile phase of dengue is associated with more severe outcomes’ was recently awarded the 2021-2022 Alexandre Yersin Prize for Outstanding Publications.

OUCRU SPEAR Digital Diaries

Healthcare workers and community members in Indonesia, Nepal and Vietnam have been documenting their personal experiences of Covid-19. They have each made their own ‘digital diary’, using a range of creative tools and with technical support from the project team. These diaries form part of the SPEAR project: exploring the experiences and impacts of COVID-19 for healthcare workers and vulnerable communities.

Clinical trials for a malaria vaccine start in Mali and Indonesia

Sanaria Inc. announced that two new Phase 2 trials of its pioneering malaria vaccines have started. The first is in 6- to 10-year-old children living in Bancoumana, Mali, a malarious region of West Africa. The second is in Indonesian soldiers based in Sumatra, Indonesia. The soldiers will be deploying for six to nine months this coming August to an intensely malarious district in eastern Indonesia.