Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

Congratulations to everyone involved in contributing to FIEBRE’s success - the clinical and laboratory staff, hospital, participants and local communities. The team has continued working throughout the COVID-19 epidemic despite national restrictions which slowed down enrolment and limited field activities.

FIEBRE team © © 2020 MORU. Photographer: Athirat Black.

Recruitment of FIEBRE participants ended in Laos on 31 October 2020. The LOMWRU team started enrolling patients on 9 October 2018 at Vientiane Provincial Hospital. In total, 1961 participants were enrolled – more than the other participating FIEBRE sites to date – and with the Laos team reaching the adult recruitment target of 600 for both in- and outpatients. A number of patients are still being followed up. The first set of samples were shipped to LSHTM in early 2020 and are now at international reference laboratories awaiting diagnostics. Analysis of these samples will produce the first results of the study aside from preliminary data from point-of-care tests carried out on site.

The team faced clinical and logistical challenges including difficulty in taking blood samples from children and travelling long distances to recruit controls (healthy people who were not always interested in taking part). To mark the end of recruitment, the LOMWRU team at the site came to Vientiane capital for a celebratory lunch this week with other staff who had supported the study implementation, before the valiant Dr Khamfong heads off to Salavan to cover Dr Chom’s maternity leave (pictured).    

FIEBRE has helped with the clinical diagnostic capacity and treatment of infectious diseases in the local community, as blood culture and other tests were not available in the hospital previously. The information collected by the study may contribute to the development of treatment guidelines for fever in the future, especially in settings where there's no laboratory diagnostics or little data available. For more details, visit the FIEBRE website.

 - With thanks to Ruth Lorimer for text and Athirat Black for photo

Similar stories

Global Research on AntiMicrobial resistance (GRAM) project

Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is responsible for at least 1.27 million deaths per year — with over 97,000 deaths in 2019 in SE Asia alone, according to a study published in The Lancet by the Global Research on AntiMicrobial resistance (GRAM) project, who urged urgent action from policymakers and health communities to avoid further preventable deaths.

Susie, Phaik Yeong, Richard and Paul among new full Oxford professors!

In the 2021 Oxford Recognition of Distinction round, four MORU colleagues were awarded Full Professor title.

All-nighter: staying up to fight malaria

Featured in Nature, Victor Chaumeau collects mosquitoes in Myanmar to better understand how to control malaria.

Antibiotic accountability: how countries and companies perform

Patients in north Africa and the Middle East are using antibiotics in sharply rising quantities far beyond the global average, raising concerns over the escalating risks of resistance to medicines to treat bacterial infections. Estimated antibiotic consumption for 204 countries between 2000 and 2018 shows a 46 per cent increase in global antibiotic usage, with a surge in nations including India and Vietnam.

New! A learning framework about antimicrobial resistance for children and young people

A downloadable resource for educators, health & research professionals to help develop young peoples’ understanding of AMR and positive actions they can take to mitigate it.

Overusing antibiotics? Find out with Antibiotic Footprint Calculator

To mark WHO World Antimicrobial Awareness Week, 18-24 Nov 2021, and help reduce the overuse of antibiotics, MORU researchers have released a new, easy to use online tool – Antibiotic Footprint Calculator – that could make an important contribution in the fight against antimicrobial resistance (AMR), one of the world’s most significant emerging threats to public health.