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The impact of COVID-19 is quite evident at present – entire countries and cities are under lockdown, offices and industries shut and academia at a standstill. However, many people in Bangladesh remain unaware or indifferent to the warnings and safety protocols that ought to be followed to stop COVID-19’s spread. Since enforcing social distancing in a densely populated country like Bangladesh is very challenging, making people aware and maintenance of hygiene are the main means to stop the spread of COVID-19.

Screenshot of the dashboard of Groupmappers Bangladesh Covid-19 website

To assist these necessary public measures, GroupMappers, a volunteer group established and led by the MORU Epidemiology Department, has built a dashboard on the COVID-19 outbreak for Bangladesh. The dashboard is available to anyone with internet access and portrays the up-to-date situation of COVID-19 in Bangladesh with daily updates and new analyses added in real-time. It uses data from press releases of the Integrated Control Room, DGHS, Mohakhali, Dhaka; HEOC; and IECDR. Features include graphs of confirmed cases, deaths, recovered, tested, quarantine, isolation history, age and gender; and maps showing numbers of confirmed and quarantine cases, the location of the nearest hospital for testing; current lockdowns in Bangladesh; and educational videos from the WHO.

To follow the more live updated status of COVID-19 in Bangladesh, keep an eye on the GroupMappers' dashboard:

Desktop Version: https://arcg.is/08W05H

Mobile Version: https://arcg.is/1v8qSi

- Thank you, H. Rainak Khan Real, for this text and images

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