Cookies on this website

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Accept all cookies' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. If you click 'Reject all non-essential cookies' only necessary cookies providing core functionality such as security, network management, and accessibility will be enabled. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

A pioneering academic conference will bring together, for the first time, people from all over the world dealing with the problem of poor quality medicines and their impact on public health. The Medicine Quality & Public Health conference will take place at Keble College, Oxford, 23-28 Sept 2018. It will provide a unique opportunity for health authorities, scientists, pharmacists, lawyers and international organisations to discuss the problem and outline the necessary steps to tackle the issue on a global scale.

Numerous multicoloured pills

The proliferation of poor quality medicines is an important but neglected public health problem, threatening millions of people all over the world, both in developing and wealthy countries. Although – rightly - there has been much attention to improving access to affordable medicines, there has been less emphasis on ensuring that they are good quality or not altogether falsified.

“All over the world, medicines regulatory authorities, research groups, international organisations, law enforcement agencies and other key stakeholders, including the pharmaceutical industry, are working hard to keep patients safe and to try to ensure that the benefits of modern medicine are delivered,” says Prof Paul Newton, Head of the Medicine Quality Group at the Infectious Diseases Data Observatory (IDDO), Director of the Oxford clinical research unit in Laos and the instigator of the conference.

“However, there has never been an opportunity for the diverse stakeholders involved in medicine quality and drug regulation to come together within the framework of a dedicated academic conference to share ideas and expertise. One of the event’s key objectives is to develop a consensus statement to be widely disseminated to interested parties and policy makers, establishing the conference as a turning point in our collective approach to tackling poor quality medicines.”

The conference was inspired by a successful multidisciplinary annual course on the Quality of Medical Products & Public Health, which has been held since 2015 at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine and Boston University. This year the course and conference will run sequentially, allowing participants to combine in-depth training with networking and scientific discussion.

Discounts and fellowships are available for participants from low- and middle-income countries.

If you are interested in attending the conference tickets are nearly sold out, please visit the conference website or email mqph2018@ndm.ox.ac.uk.

Similar stories

Pilot study detects diverse DNA in ingredients of falsified tablets

A recent multidisciplinary pilot study, originating from LOMWRU and the Medicine Quality Research Group of IDDO and MORU, investigated whether bacterial, plant, fungal and animal DNA in the ingredients and from the environment (eDNA) could be detected from falsified (aka counterfeit) tablets.

COPCOV investigators meet, and prepare to submit for publication

On 15-16 Dec, COPCOV investigators from around the world met in Bangkok to review study results and plan next steps. Led by co-PIs Prof Sir Nick White and Dr Will Schilling, and funded by the Wellcome Trust, the MORU-led COPCOV ( Chloroquine prevention of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in the healthcare setting) is the world’s largest multinational trial of COVID-19 prevention.

Expert Comment: Biotechnology allows us to make unprecedented interventions for conservation

In the wake of high-profile reports on the devastating toll human activity has had on global biodiversity, nations are expected to adopt the Convention on Biodiversity post-2020 framework that outlines measures to ensure humans live in harmony with nature.

Researchers call for antimicrobial resistance surveillance to be improved

The number of studies reporting antimicrobial resistance (AMR) data has increased in Africa, South and South East Asia according to new research in the International Journal of Infectious Diseases.

Are we getting tafenoquine dosing right?

Researchers analysing clinical trial data for the new antimalarial drug tafenoquine find that higher doses are needed to cure reliably vivax malaria infection.

New SMRU building opened in Thailand to provide health care to marginalized populations

The inauguration of a new joint Shoklo Malaria Research Unit (SMRU) and Borderland Health Foundation (BHF) Building took place in Mae Ramat, Thailand, this week.