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Current recommended treatment regimens for the most widely used medicine for uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria may be sub-optimal for small children and pregnant women according to a study led by Professor Joel Tarning.

Nurse and a pregnant woman © Credit: Allan Gichigi, Kenya UN Development Programme

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