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The World Mosquito Program posted the results of a 3-year randomised controlled trial in Yogyakarta, Indonedia, providing compelling gold standard evidence for the efficacy of the Wolbachia method in controlling dengue. The deployment of Wolbachia-carrying Aedes aegypti mosquitoes lead to a reduction of 77% in dengue incidence in Wolbachia-treated versus untreated areas.

Participants to the randomised controlled trial using Wolbachia-infected mosquitoes to control dengue

Professor Cameron Simmons affiiated with OUCRU is co-principal investigator on this project, along with Professor Adi Utarini at the University of Gadjah Mada in Indonesia.

Read more on the World Mosquito Program website

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