Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.
Skip to main content

<jats:title>Abstract</jats:title> <jats:sec> <jats:title>Background</jats:title> <jats:p>The Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) for neonatal mortality has identified its reduction as one of the main targets to be achieved by 2030. We provide a descriptive report on neonatal outcomes from the only neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) in Guinea.</jats:p> </jats:sec> <jats:sec> <jats:title>Methods</jats:title> <jats:p>Data collection took place between November 2004 and May 2005 at the NICU of the Institute of Child Health in the capital, Conakry. A descriptive summary of the neonatal, maternal and intrapartum characteristics is reported.</jats:p> </jats:sec> <jats:sec> <jats:title>Results</jats:title> <jats:p>A total of 294 neonates were admitted to the NICU incubators during the study period, transferred either from hospitals (48%) or directly from their homes (52%). The most common reasons for admission were foetal distress (37.1%) and maternal–foetal infections (35.4%). Among 270 neonates with known outcome, the overall mortality among the admitted children remained high at 20.7% (56/270),with a large proportion of the deaths (71.4%, 40/56) occurring within 7 d of their admission. The mortality rate was 23.7% (31/131) among the neonates who were admitted to our NICU after home birth and 17.9% (25/139) among those who were transferred from hospitals (OR: 1.41, 95% CI: 0.75–2.67).</jats:p> </jats:sec> <jats:sec> <jats:title>Conclusion</jats:title> <jats:p>Almost one in every five neonates who were admitted to the NICU incubator died during the study period. More hospitals equipped with NICU facilities are urgently required if Guinea is to achieve the SDG target for neonatal mortality.</jats:p> </jats:sec>

Original publication

DOI

10.1093/inthealth/ihz001

Type

Journal article

Journal

International Health

Publisher

Oxford University Press (OUP)

Publication Date

13/11/2019

Volume

11

Pages

455 - 462