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The Global Health Training Centre now has over 100,000 members across 196 countries who have taken over 500,000 e-Learning modules! Here’s what people say about our most popular courses

TGHN poster: 100,000 members, 510,000 modules taken, 213,00 certificates awarded, 196 countries

There are 28 free peer reviewed e-Learning courses available on the Training Centre that are highly pragmatic, adaptable  and designed to provide research staff and front line health care workers of all roles, all regions and all disease areas with the ‘how-to’ knowledge to safely conduct high quality research.

Each course has been developed from material donated by respected organisations and institutions such as the World Health Organization, Harvard University, the Nuffield Council of Bioethics, the Geneva Foundation for Medical Education and Research and many more. All courses are peer reviewed before launch, reviewed periodically and easily accessible in slow speed internet areas. A certificate is issued at the end of each course once a minimum of 80% is achieved in the final quiz.

Here’s why members would recommend the most popular courses to a friend:

Course: ICH Good Clinical Practice E6(R2)

“Since it assures a standard of credibility and accuracy in improving health care research. It is an imperative course for all those interested in the health care profession.”

“Because it's very important for all persons working in crisis affected areas such in Africa, where we are doing research on new vaccines with EPICENTRE/ MSF-France.”

“It reminds clinicians how best to execute research activities hence ensuring quality and reliable data.”

Course: Introduction to clinical research

“It is very informative and will be very useful especially to someone who is just starting out in the field or have little or no Clinical Research background.”

“This because the course provides up to date information and help for continued professional development. It also helps to develop research skills for the public health professional. Nice to manage clinical issues.”

“It is very useful for researchers in LMICs, especially as it is a structured free resource.”

Course: Research Ethics Online Training

“Because such courses create awareness about the ethical issues in conducting research. As now a days a lot of ethical and scientific misconduct is occurring in research, especially in developing countries.”

“If anyone is conducting research, the information given in the module is crucial for basic introduction into research.”

“Very comprehensive, updated, concise way of learning a very important topic made so easy.”

To find a course to support your training and development visit our website

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