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COVID-19 in Nepal is out of hand and slowly, but surely tracking the infection in India. Although many healthcare workers have been vaccinated throughout the country, the actual vaccination rate is likely very low for the entire country. Buddha Basynat discusses Nepal’s COVID response so far, and why vaccines are an urgent priority.

Mask on a black background © Mark König

Comment and opinion from Professor Buddha Basnyat, Director of OUCRU-Nepal

The full story is available on the BMJ Opinion website

The COVID situation in Nepal is dire with many hospitalisations & deaths, economic hardship, unemployment, poverty and hunger. In discussion with our Nepal Unit, we have set up a fundraiser to support the Rotary Club of Kathmandu Mid-Town who are providing food to workers who have lost their jobs due to the pandemic.
All donations gratefully received.

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