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The WHO 2030 NTD Roadmap has just been launched, and a recent Geneva Health Forum panel took that as its starting point to discuss the possibility of eliminating neglected tropical diseases (NTDs). Professor Philippe Guérin, IDDO’s Director, joined co-panellists Dr Amy Fall, the Global Health Medical for Africa Region Lead at Sanofi, Dr Mwele Malecela, Director of the Department of Control of Neglected Tropical Diseases at the WHO, and Dr Nathalie Strub-Wourgaft, Medical Director at Drugs for Neglected Diseases initiative (DNDi) back in November 2020.

Geneva Health Forum logo

The wide-ranging discussion highlighted the need for more research and development, the importance of sustainability, and pointed out that good health creates good wealth.

Twenty diseases endemic in 150 countries are officially listed as NTDs. A resolution to eliminate these diseases was set out in the WHO’s 2020 Roadmap, and the new 2030 Roadmap builds on that work to deliver individual programmes to reduce the burden of these NTDs. While major progress has been made in the last decade, panellists agreed that more work was needed in terms of diagnostics, tools and surveillance in the current political and economic climate.

The full story is available on the IDDO website

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Registration is open for The Global Health Network Conference 2022

To tackle disease we need evidence to be generated through every type of health research study. This conference aims to bring together health research teams, organisations, health-workers, policy makers and practitioners to explore together how health research can be embedded into every healthcare setting. Join us at The Global Health Network Conference 2022 at the University of Cape Town, South Africa, 24 – 25 November 2022