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Using cutting-edge genomic sequencing techniques, researchers at the University of Oxford have identified almost all the genomic variation that gives people resistance to 13 of the most common tuberculosis drug treatments.

Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacillus

The Comprehensive Resistance Prediction for Tuberculosis International Consortium (CRyPTIC) research project has collected the largest ever global dataset of clinical M. tuberculosis samples from across the world consisting of 15,211 samples from 27 countries on five continents.

“This has been a massive international effort over five years, and will translate into benefits for patients and the wider community as these data are implemented to diagnose and manage drug-resistant TB effectively, and thereby reduce its onward transmission,” said Dr Timothy Walker, Wellcome Fellow at OUCRU and Associate Professor at the University of Oxford.

Read more about this project on the OUCRU website

The full story is available on the University of Oxford website.

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