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The Life-saving Instruction for Emergencies (LIFE) is a 3D simulation training app for smartphones that teaches healthcare workers how to manage medical emergencies. LIFE is a scenario-based mobile and virtual reality (VR) gaming platform that teaches healthcare workers to identify and manage medical emergencies using game-like training techniques to reinforce the key steps that need to be performed in order to save lives.

A newborn baby in view on the pre-warmed resuscitaire with an adjacent trolley having several essential resuscitation equipment.

The first three scenarios available for LIFE teach healthcare workers how to resuscitate a newborn baby. After they have learned the correct life-saving steps, users are awarded a certificate of completion which can be registered with the Kenya Paediatric Association for Continuing Professional Development (CPD) credit.

The full story is available on the Oxford Tropical Medicine website

Download the app (for Android)

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