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On the 11th February the MsC IHTM students visited the House of Parliament and presented their policy briefs in the House of Lords.

MSc IHTM team visiting the Houses of Parliament
Photo of the 2019-2020 MSc IHTM cohort visiting to the Houses of Parliament

The five briefs focused on a variety of themes:

  • providing better universal healthcare by strengthening better primary health care and improving digital health tech
  • develop affordable diagnostic tools and medicines for neglected tropical diseases
  • benefits and risks of multi-sectoral collaboration in the funding of neglected tropical diseases programmes
  • benefits of investing in programmes that improve child health through immunisation & nutrition
  • potential collaboration between UK and Bangladeshi governments to ensure the hepatitis C crisis amongst the Rohingya refugees in Cox’s Bazar is contained and extinguished

The presentations were very well received by our host Lord Tress, Lord Collins of Highbury and Mr Jeremy Lefroy (former chair of the APPG NTDs).

Links to the policy briefs posted on the official APPG website

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