Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

A feedback dissemination meeting on the just concluded Nairobi newborn study took place on Monday 30th January and was attended by 75 delegates. Discussions were on: routine newborn care in newborn units, infrastructure and services available in health facilities, accessibility of drugs, newborn care in the maternity wards, material and human resource capacity, utilization of inpatient newborn services; and the quality of existing services.

CTMGH logo for News

Representatives from 32 health facilities across Nairobi City County from public, private and faith-based hospitals who participated in the study attended. Partners in the study including the Ministry of Health, the Nursing Council of Kenya, the University of Nairobi, UNICEF, the University of Nairobi and Save the Children were also present.

The ongoing study is part of a larger study referred to as Health Services that Deliver for Newborns (HSD-N) and has five phases, which are: exploring the quality of and need for inpatient neonatal care in Nairobi City County; exploring the context of neonatal nursing, how nurses manage the pressures of working in a newborn unit; task analysis, describing tasks missed care, quantifying tasks done and those not done; understanding what influences the ability of nurses to provide quality inpatient care; documenting the roles and perceptions of mothers of hospitalized sick newborns. The last phase of the study is due for completion in the first quarter of 2018.

Similar stories

Receiving and responding to community feedback during health system crises in Kenya

KWTRP Publication Research

The responsiveness of a health system is one of its goals, alongside fairness in financing and outcomes. Listening and responding to the public can make a health system stronger and fairer. However, responsiveness is likely to be undermined, especially for vulnerable and marginal populations, in periods of crises such as disease outbreaks. In the current COVID-19 crisis, there has been more focus on health system control interventions, with minimal consideration of community views. KWTRP colleagues in Kenya consider community engagement and citizens feedback channels, concerns raised by the public and how they were handled, and highlight lessons learned.

Knowledge brokering platform launched to support health systems in the African region

KWTRP

The World Health Organization and partners including the KEMRI Wellcome Trust Research Programme launched AHOP (African Health Observatory Platform), an online platform to promote the exchange of evidence and experience across countries in the African region. By working to foster evidence-informed decision-making in an endeavor to re-engineer health service delivery, the initiative is expected to drive countries’ health system resilience efforts.

Trials of Oxford coronavirus vaccine begin in Kenya

KWTRP Research

Kenya has joined the global efforts in search of an effective vaccine for COVID-19 with the start of a trial evaluating the ChAdOx1 nCoV-2019 Oxford coronavirus vaccine. Following the necessary approvals from regulators, as well as the national ministry of health, and Kilifi county, the first volunteers for the trial have recently received their vaccinations.

Oxford Global Research

@Oxford General KWTRP MORU OUCRU

Oxford is world-famous for research excellence and home to some of the most talented people from across the globe. To showcase our global research, the University launched a Global Research Map, highlighting areas of research we are conducting overseas.

COVID-19: examining theories for Africa’s low death rates

@Oxford KWTRP

Africa accounts for 17% of the global population but only 3.5% of the reported global COVID-19 deaths. In many African countries, transmission has been higher but severity and mortality much lower than originally predicted based on experience in China and Europe. Kevin Marsh and Moses Alobo argue that Africa’s much younger population explains a very large part of the apparent difference. Some of the remaining gap is probably due to under reporting of events but there are a number of other plausible explanations, ranging from climatic differences, pre-existing immunity, genetic factors to behavioural differences.

COVID-19 vaccine research in Kenya

KWTRP Research

Researchers at KWTRP and University of Oxford collaborate to evaluate the ChAdOx1 nCOV-19 vaccine in Kenya