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Established to test a range of potential treatments for COVID-19, the RECOVERY trial has included a comparison of colchicine, an anti-inflammatory drug that is commonly used to treat gout, vs. usual care alone. There has been no convincing evidence of the effect of colchicine on clinical outcomes in patients admitted to hospital with COVID-19, and recruitment to the colchicine arm of the RECOVERY trial has now closed. Recruitment to all other treatment arms – aspirin, baricitinib, Regeneron’s antibody cocktail, and dimethyl fumarate – continues as planned.

Colchicine pills

Professor Peter Horby, Joint Chief Investigator for the RECOVERY trial, said "This is the largest ever trial of colchicine and it was only possible thanks to the hard work of NHS staff and the huge contribution made by patients across the whole country. Whilst we are disappointed that the overall result is negative, it is still important information for the future care of patients in the UK and worldwide."

The full story is available on the RECOVERY website

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