Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

Millions of children weighing less than 15kg are currently denied access to Ivermectin treatment due to insufficient safety data being available to support a change to the current label indication. The WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network’s new meta-analysis provides evidence that supports removing this barrier and improving treatment equity.

African Mother and child, waiting in a health centre © Credit: Dominic Chavez World Bank

Ivermectin is a safe, broad-spectrum anthelminthic drug registered for the treatment of several neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) including onchocerciasis, lymphatic filariasis, scabies, and strongyloidiasis. These frequently afflict young children but Ivermectin use is restricted because of a lack of evidence for the safety of these drugs - alternative treatments to ivermectin are frequently less effective or potentially even toxic.

Concerns regarding the potential for neurotoxicity of Ivermectin in infancy are misplaced. This data provide limited but encouraging evidence that the Ivermectin tolerability and safety profile in children weighing less than 15kg is similar to that in heavier, older individuals.

The full story is available on WWARN website

Read the publication: A systematic review and an individual patient data meta-analysis of Ivermectin use in children weighing less than fifteen kilograms: is it time to reconsider the current contra-indication?

Similar stories

Registration is open for The Global Health Network Conference 2022

To tackle disease we need evidence to be generated through every type of health research study. This conference aims to bring together health research teams, organisations, health-workers, policy makers and practitioners to explore together how health research can be embedded into every healthcare setting. Join us at The Global Health Network Conference 2022 at the University of Cape Town, South Africa, 24 – 25 November 2022

The inside story of Recovery: how the world’s largest COVID-19 trial transformed treatment – and what it could do for other diseases

Two years ago, the Recovery trial transformed the care of COVID patients with its dexamethasone announcement. Within four hours, the steroid was included in NHS treatment recommendations. Almost overnight, treatment of COVID patients around the world changed completely. It has been estimated that dexamethasone may have saved a million lives in the first nine months following the announcement. Recovery is a groundbreaking scientific machine which, from the outset, moved at unprecedented speed. In the first 100 days alone, the trial produced three groundbreaking results that would completely reshape COVID care.

Gail Carson chair of GOARN

Dr Gail Carson from the International Severe Acute Respiratory and emerging Infection Consortium (ISARIC) is nominated chair of WHO Global Outbreak Alert & Response Network (GOARN)

RECOVERY trial celebrates two-year anniversary of life-saving dexamethasone result

Two years ago, the RECOVERY trial gave the world its first breakthrough against coronavirus: the discovery that an inexpensive steroid pill, dexamethasone, reduced deaths by up to a third from COVID-1. Within hours, the result was breaking news across the world and hospitals were adopting the drug into the standard care given to all patients with COVID-19. In the nine months following the discovery, dexamethasone saved an estimated one million lives worldwide.

Congratulations to Professor Sir David Warrell, appointed Knight Commander of the Order of St Michael and St George!

David Warrell, MORU founding director, has been appointed by the Queen ‘Knight Commander of the Order of St Michael and St George for services to global Health Research and Clinical Practice’. Please join us in congratulating Sir David on receiving this richly deserved high honour!

Major boost for Oxford’s mission to counter future pandemic threats

The Moh Family Foundation has given a substantial gift to support the work of Oxford University’s Pandemic Sciences Institute, greatly strengthening its ability to identify and counter future pandemic threats and ensure equitable access to treatments and vaccines around the world.