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Strathmore University this year hosted the Kenya Health Informatics Association (KeHIA), meet up that was rich in content with presentations and discussions from the University of Nairobi, the KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research Programme, Ministry of Health, University of Oxford, Strathmore University and Philips Health among others.

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The discussions were on how e-health can be used to deploy and to improve health outcomes in a number of health settings weather for purposes of research, conducting better patient diagnosis or for routine reporting. The theme for the meeting was ‘Digital health assets/investments in Kenya; A look into the past and future’.

The meeting that took place on the 28th of April, showed how KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research Programme together with partners including the Ministry of Health, is utilizing data across hospitals in Kenya, to improve clinical care and service delivery. Over the years, the programme with a host of collaborators including the University of Oxford has steadily improved its capacity to use data available at the health facilities to drive improvement, generate new knowledge and enhance performance monitoring.

In Kenya, there appears to be many players in e-health and more so in deployment of e-health systems across health facilities in the counties. The meet up pushed synergised work in future discussions and to have more players on board from the private sector to address duplication of systems and to drive e-health policies favourable to the Ministry of health.

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