Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

On 14 Dec, Mr Gilles Garachon, the French Ambassador to Thailand, arrived at Mae Sot in Thailand to present France’s highest award, l'Ordre National de la Légion d’honneur, to Professor François Nosten, Head of MORU’s Shoklo Malaria Research Unit (SMRU). The award is in recognition of Professsor Nosten's work over three decades fighting malaria.

Composite photo of the celebration of Francois Nosten receiving the Legion d'Honneur

Guests representing many SMRU partners who contributed to this award attended the ceremony including: Eh Ka Lu Shwe Oo from the Karen Department Health and Welfare (KDHW), Dr Cynthia Maung from the Mae Tao Clinic, Maw Ronnatrai, the former director of Mae Sot Hospital, Maw Jirapong Authaisin from the Mae Ra Mat Hospital, and representatives from Thai Public Health departments. Nick White and Nick Day represented MORU and many SMRU colleagues also attended.

The festivities later moved to the SMRU office with three generations of staff attending, and many taking turns to say how they enjoyed working with François over the years.

Please join us in giving your heartiest congratulations to François and the SMRU team for this well-deserved honour.

- With thanks to Dr Rose McGready for text and to Nick Day, Stephane Ribrault, Jordi Landier and Suphak Nosten for photos

Similar stories

Study finds steady increase in WHO-validated artemisinin resistance markers in Asia

From 2002-2018, there has been a steady increase in the places and proportion of infected people reporting validated kelch13 (K13) artemisinin resistance markers, according to a study in The Lancet Microbe. This increase in artemisinin resistance threatens efforts to eliminate malaria in Asia by 2030 — and control efforts in other endemic regions. The authors say that more consistent data collection, over longer time periods in the same areas, and rapid sharing of data are needed to map the spread of resistance and better inform policy decisions.

Global Research on AntiMicrobial resistance (GRAM) project

Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is responsible for at least 1.27 million deaths per year — with over 97,000 deaths in 2019 in SE Asia alone, according to a study published in The Lancet by the Global Research on AntiMicrobial resistance (GRAM) project, who urged urgent action from policymakers and health communities to avoid further preventable deaths.

Cross-species vaccination by Professor George Warimwe

Royal Society 2021 Africa Prize lecture from Professor George Warimwe. More than 70% of emerging infectious diseases (including viruses) are zoonotic, meaning they are acquired from animals, with some causing serious illness and death in humans as well as the animal host. But, what if we could immunise both humans and animals with the same vaccine?

RECOVERY trial team members appointed MBEs

Two RECOVERY Trial team members have been recognised in the New Year Honours list 2022. RECOVERY Trial coordinator, Professor Richard Haynes, has been appointed Member of the Order of the British Empire (MBE) for services to Global Health, and Senior Clinical Trial Manager, Lucy Fletcher, has been appointed MBE for services to Clinical Trials. The New Year Honours list recognises outstanding achievements by a wide range of extraordinary people from across the United Kingdom. People are awarded honours for achievements in their field of work (including health, education, science and technology), as well as for making a difference to their community.

Susie, Phaik Yeong, Richard and Paul among new full Oxford professors!

In the 2021 Oxford Recognition of Distinction round, four MORU colleagues were awarded Full Professor title.

RECOVERY Trial wins ‘Oscar of Higher Education’ for STEM Research Project of the year

The RECOVERY Trial has been awarded the 2021 Times Higher Education (THE) Award in the ‘Research Project of the Year: STEM’ category.