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KEMRI-Wellcome is a high-tech research programme based in Kilifi County, in rural Kenya. Alongside research like sequencing DNA or intensive analysis of population data, the programme actively engages the community.

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The School Engagement Program was started by Alun Davies, who was responding to local leader’s requests for input into local schools, to scientists wanting to have a way of contributing to local education, and to nurture an interest in science and in scientific careers among Secondary school students in the County.  “Kilifi, just like anywhere else in the world, has a lot of untapped talent. We felt that we could draw from KEMRI’s research staff and laboratories, to give opportunities for local students, to nurture their talent and their interest in science. Maybe one day a student from Kilifi will become the future scientist who develops the cures for HIV and Ebola.” he states. Alun’s project which was funded by the Wellcome Trust included a School Leavers’ Attachment Scheme.

The full story is available on the KWTRP website

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