Cookies on this website

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Accept all cookies' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. If you click 'Reject all non-essential cookies' only necessary cookies providing core functionality such as security, network management, and accessibility will be enabled. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

The RECOVERY trial has been named David Sackett Trial of the Year by the Society for Clinical Trials. The award was presented today at the Society for Clinical Trials’ 42nd Annual Meeting.

Logo of the Society for Clinical Trials

The Randomised Evaluation of COVID-19 Therapy (RECOVERY) trial is a large, pragmatic randomised trial for the treatment of hospitalised patients with suspected or confirmed COVID-19. It was designed and implemented at extraordinary speed in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic, at a time of great need for effective treatments to reduce mortality among hospitalised patients.

Peter Horby, Professor of Emerging Infectious Diseases in the Nuffield Department of Medicine, University of Oxford, and Joint Chief Investigator for the RECOVERY trial, said ‘This award is a testament and a tribute to the exceptional work of many thousands of people working under the most difficult circumstances. 2020 was awful in so many ways but the RECOVERY trial was uplifting, showing what can be achieved when there is unity, resolve and a commitment to good science. RECOVERY is a truly national achievement and every person involved should feel incredibly proud. I would encourage them to regularly remind themselves that there are many thousands of people who are only alive today thanks to their efforts.’ 

Every year since 2008, the Society for Clinical Trials has awarded the David Sackett Trial of the Year Award to a randomised, controlled trial published in the previous calendar year that best fulfills the following standards: improves the lot of humankind; provides the basis for a substantial, beneficial change in health care; reflects expertise in subject matter, excellence in methodology, and concern for study participants; overcomes obstacles in implementation; and based on the presentation of its design, execution, and results is a model of clarity and intellectual soundness.

The full story is available on the RECOVERY website

Similar stories

FORESFA and VIE project meetings

The Medicine Quality Research Group organised a multidisciplinary hybrid meeting at Keble College, Oxford, July 3 to 6, for the FORESFA project ‘Forensic epidemiology and impact of substandard and falsified antimicrobials on public health’, funded by a Wellcome Collaborative Award.

Incomplete reporting of COVID-19 disease severity criteria compromises meta-analysis

Patients affected by COVID-19 should be treated according to the severity of their disease. However, not all key national or international organisations define severity in the same way. This imprecision in severity assessment compromises the validity of some therapeutic recommendations. Using individual patient data would better guide and improve therapeutic recommendations for COVID-19.

A multi-country study of monkeypox being launched – first cases enrolled in Geneva

Researchers have launched a new study to improve our understanding of monkeypox disease. The first patients have now been recruited at Hôpitaux Universitaires de Genève (HUG) in Switzerland

Pandemic Sciences Institute formally launched in Oxford

The University of Oxford’s Pandemic Sciences Institute (PSI) has been formally launched at a two-day event at the Blavatnik School of Government, at which the lead researchers set out its direction and strategy for the next five years.The PSI will draw together academics and experts from across the University to build a multi-disciplinary institute focused on reducing the risk from infectious threats through science, innovation and building global preparedness.

Field evaluation of EasyScan GO: a digital malaria microscopy device

Microscopic examination of Giemsa-stained blood films is key to quantifying and detecting malaria parasites but there can be difficulties in ensuring both a high-quality manual reading and inter-reader reliability. The EasyScan GO was developed as a potential solution to this, a microscopy device using machine-learning-based image analysis for automated parasite detection and quantification.

Dengue Research Article Awarded The 2021 – 2022 Alexandre Yersin Prize for Outstanding Publications

OUCRU research article titled ‘Combination of inflammatory and vascular markers in the febrile phase of dengue is associated with more severe outcomes’ was recently awarded the 2021-2022 Alexandre Yersin Prize for Outstanding Publications.