Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

Rob van der Pluijm presented encouraging findings from TRAC II trial analyses of Triple Artemisinin Combination Therapies to the All-Party Parliamentary Group on Malaria & NTDs on March 19th in Westminster at the Houses of Parliament.

Rob van der Pluijm in Westminster © Credit: Andrea Stewart

Did you know? In the UK, members of parliament (MPs) from different political parties form All-Party Parliamentary Groups to discuss themes of particular importance to the UK government and its populace.

The APPG on malaria and NTDs gathered March 19 in Westminster; Jeremy Lefroy MP welcomed Rob van der Pluijm on behalf of MORU, the Tracking Resistance to Artemesinin Collaboration II and the Developing Triple Artemisinin-based Combination Therapies (DeTACT) Project.

Rob presented encouraging findings from TRAC II and launch plans for DeTACT in Africa and Asia. The UK Department for International Development’s (DfID) Senior Global Health Advisor attended alongside colleagues from the Wellcome Trust, LSHTM, Imperial College and other malaria advocacy groups.

Pertinent questions included whether DeTACT was an innovative attempt at ‘global health preparedness’ for eventual drug resistance in Africa; whether the WHO and national health programmes in endemic countries were likely to recommend triple dose treatments soon enough to prevent or slow the impact of drug resistance; and how well Mefloquine was tolerated when part of the Triple ACT combination.

Read a summary of the Westminster event.

Photo: APPG on Malaria & NTDs Chair Jeremy Lefroy MP (right) and Catherine West MP (second right), together with Rob van der Pluijm (centre) and other research presenters from LSHTM and Nottingham University. Text and photo credit: Andrea Stewart.

Similar stories

Study finds steady increase in WHO-validated artemisinin resistance markers in Asia

From 2002-2018, there has been a steady increase in the places and proportion of infected people reporting validated kelch13 (K13) artemisinin resistance markers, according to a study in The Lancet Microbe. This increase in artemisinin resistance threatens efforts to eliminate malaria in Asia by 2030 — and control efforts in other endemic regions. The authors say that more consistent data collection, over longer time periods in the same areas, and rapid sharing of data are needed to map the spread of resistance and better inform policy decisions.

Global Research on AntiMicrobial resistance (GRAM) project

Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is responsible for at least 1.27 million deaths per year — with over 97,000 deaths in 2019 in SE Asia alone, according to a study published in The Lancet by the Global Research on AntiMicrobial resistance (GRAM) project, who urged urgent action from policymakers and health communities to avoid further preventable deaths.

Susie, Phaik Yeong, Richard and Paul among new full Oxford professors!

In the 2021 Oxford Recognition of Distinction round, four MORU colleagues were awarded Full Professor title.

RECOVERY Trial launches in South Africa

The world’s largest clinical trial investigating treatments for COVID-19 has now launched in South Africa, with the first patient recruited today. This is the fifth country to take part in RECOVERY, joining Nepal, Indonesia, Vietnam, and the United Kingdom.

RECOVERY Trial wins ‘Oscar of Higher Education’ for STEM Research Project of the year

The RECOVERY Trial has been awarded the 2021 Times Higher Education (THE) Award in the ‘Research Project of the Year: STEM’ category.

All-nighter: staying up to fight malaria

Featured in Nature, Victor Chaumeau collects mosquitoes in Myanmar to better understand how to control malaria.