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MORU, SMRU and FilmAid Foundation invite you to the Bangkok Premiere of Under the Mask on the 17th June. This drama film is based on real testimonies of TB patients. The story follows the lives of our characters as they journey from diagnosis to treatment and help from the SMRU TB team, and explores how each discovers their capacity to overcome the deadly disease and share their knowledge and experience with others. Made in the local language, this film provides an engaging and inspiring tool for raising TB awareness in the community.

MORU, SMRU and FilmAid Foundation have the pleasure to invite you to the Bangkok Premiere of Under the Mask

Monday 17th June 2019 in Bangkok Screening Room
Woof Pack Building, 2nd Floor, 1/3-7 Sala Daeng Soi 1, Silom, Bangrak, Bangkok 10550

Under the Mask is a drama film based on the real testimony of tuberculosis (TB) patients. The story follows the lives of our characters as they journey from diagnosis to treatment and help from the Shoklo Malaria Research Unit (SMRU) TB team, and explores how each discovers their capacity to overcome the deadly disease and to share their knowledge and experience with others.

Under the Mask is a powerful look at TB on the Thai-Myanmar border. Made in the local language and with the local community it provides an engaging and inspiring tool for raising TB awareness amongst the community.

Produced by the FilmAid Foundation, Under the Mask, uses non-professional actors from the border community to allow TB patients to tell their story of life with TB. The FilmAid Foundation uses a participatory approach to filmmaking, using cast and crew drawn from grassroots and vulnerable communities.

Feedback from villagers after watching the film:
Health education with the movie is more effective than verbal sessions, because we (the community) can memorize a lot and share what’s in the movie…pamphlets are not very effective, as most villagers can’t read or write.”
This film gives us hope and ways to escape TB

UNDER THE MASK – Film Duration 74 mins HD (Language: Burmese Subtitles: English)

For FilmAid Foundation
Director: Saw Ler Wah
Director of Photography: Saw Min Thu
Editor: Sone Lin Htoo
Writers: Saw Ler Wah & Mary Soan
Producer: Mary Soan

Cast
Zay Yar Aung as U Tajar Min - Ma Mi Nge as U Tajar Min’s Wife - Ko Ko Aung as A’Tun - Si Thu as A’Sai - Daw Nwe Yee as Ma Zar Zar
Khin Mg Myint as Ko Kyaw Aung - Dr Banyar as Dr Banyar - Hser Eh as Nyein Chan - Naw Htay Paw as Nurse Paw Poe

Producer (SMRU): Dr Michele Vincenti, Shoklo Malaria Research Unit

Executive Producer (MORU): Associate Professor Phaik Yeong Cheah, Mahidol-Oxford Tropical Medicine Research Unit

Funded by: A Wellcome Trust Provision for Public Engagement Grant & FilmAid Foundation

Programme:
17.45 Doors open, drinks and snacks
18.45 Welcome and introductions
19.05 Under the Mask
20.20 -21.30 Q & A with Director and Producers

For more information please contact: Rita@tropmedres.ac

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