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How do you turn orange into grapefruit? What is digital wildfire? Is love real? Booking is now open for the Curiosity Carnival on Friday 29 September 2017, part of European Researchers' Night.

Curiosity Carnival logo

Research is all about lab coats and test tubes, right? Actually, research is about much, much more – in fact many researchers have never worn a lab coat in their lives! Research is feeding curiosity and answering questions.

The Curiosity Carnival on Friday 29 September is a chance to find out what research is really all about, meet researchers, ask questions and discover how research affects and changes all our lives.

The night is a huge festival of curiosity – a city-wide programme of activities across the University of Oxford’s museums, libraries, gardens and woods. There will be a wide range of activities for all ages and interests – live experiments, games, stalls, busking, debates, music, dance and a pub-style quiz.

Oxford’s Curiosity Carnival 2017 will join hundreds of other European cities in celebrating European Researchers’ Night.

Read more on the University of Oxford website

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