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Epilepsy affects the brain and causes repeated seizures. Prompt diagnosis and effective management are key to controlling the condition, the cause of which is not fully understood . There are huge gaps in the way that epilepsy is managed in African countries, including Kenya. The Conversation Africa’s Health Editor Joy Wanja Muraya spoke to Dr Symon Kariuki on what success might look like.

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