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The World Health Organization and partners including the KEMRI Wellcome Trust Research Programme launched AHOP (African Health Observatory Platform), an online platform to promote the exchange of evidence and experience across countries in the African region. By working to foster evidence-informed decision-making in an endeavor to re-engineer health service delivery, the initiative is expected to drive countries’ health system resilience efforts.

The African Health Observatory Platform on Health Systems and Policy (AHOP) aims to facilitate cross-country learning and accelerate the uptake of high-quality evidence and experiences reflecting the complexity and diversity of the region. This knowledge translation effort will ultimately help strengthen national and regional health system design and performance.

In Kenya, the Platform will be hosted in KEMRI Wellcome Trust Research Programme. With Dr Benjamin Tsofa, Dr Jacinta Nzinga, Prof Sam Kinyanjui, Prof Edwine Barasa, Dr Kui Muraya, Dr Emelda Okiro, Dr David Gathara and Alex Njeru as part of the committee

The full press release is available on the KWTRP website

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