Cookies on this website

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Accept all cookies' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. If you click 'Reject all non-essential cookies' only necessary cookies providing core functionality such as security, network management, and accessibility will be enabled. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

A downloadable resource for educators, health & research professionals to help develop young peoples’ understanding of AMR and positive actions they can take to mitigate it.

Child showing coronaviruses drawn on her hand, with pills, and a red cross drawn on a adult hand © Stutika Thapa Shrestha YAAR! Youth working group Nepal

Working in partnership with young people in Kenya, Vietnam, Thailand and Nepal, a team from the Oxford Tropical Network have developed a learning resource to support educators, health professionals and researchers as they work with children and youth to better understand AMR.

Download 'An Antimicrobial Resistance Learning Framework for Children and Young People' on the Zenodo website

Solutions to the emerging challenge of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) will require ideas and actions from a wide range of people including children and young people.  In order for them to meaningfully engage with the challenge and contribute to solutions, they need a clear understanding of AMR, its causes, effects and current strategies for mitigation.  This learning framework is a resource for teachers, educators, research scientists and informal learning providers to enable them to develop young peoples’ understanding of:

  • The science behind AMR
  • The individual, community and global health risks AMR presents
  • The positive actions they can take to mitigate against AMR

The framework identifies key learning outcomes appropriate to different age groups that are applicable across a diverse range of settings and learning environments. It can be used as a tool for structuring curricula and learning activities.

This framework was developed by the Youth Against Antimicrobial Resistance (YAAR!) team who includes researchers, engagement practioners, young people and teachers. The team was led by Dr Mary Chambers in Vietnam, Mr Vu Duy Thanh, Prof Phaik Yeong Cheah in Thailand, Prof Sam Kinyanjui in Kenya, Dr Alun Davis in Oxford and Prof Abhilasha Karkey in Nepal.  The project was commissioned by Wellcome Education team in partnership with the Drug Resistant Infections team. 

Visit the YAAR! website for more information

Fleming’s plate: A poem by Alex Hinga and read by Joyce MwanzaFleming’s plate: A poem by Alex Hinga and read by Joyce Mwanza

Similar stories

VAnguard Launch

KWTRP hosted the launch of the VAnguard research project. The NIHR Funded Project Builds Knowledge-base on Factors Influencing Vaccine Impact among Communities in Kenya and Uganda. The project aims to strengthen collaborations between national and international stakeholders in the identification of social and biological factors that impair vaccine impact in African communities, to develop integrated strategies and recommendations to optimize vaccine impact, and to contribute to health equity in Africa. The launch concurrently took place in Kenya and Uganda from 28th – 30th November 2022.

New SMRU building opened in Thailand to provide health care to marginalized populations

The inauguration of a new joint Shoklo Malaria Research Unit (SMRU) and Borderland Health Foundation (BHF) Building took place in Mae Ramat, Thailand, this week.

Constant genetic surveillance necessary to keep multidrug-resistant malaria parasite strains in check, study finds

Continually monitoring malaria parasite populations is necessary to prevent outbreaks of previously dormant multidrug-resistant malaria strains, say University of Oxford researchers. Multidrug-resistant malaria parasite strains can rapidly grow or collapse in response to public health policy changes, say the researchers in a study published today in The Lancet.

Meta-analysis informed the updated WHO guidelines for treatment of uncomplicated malaria in the first trimester of pregnancy

A new WWARN meta-analysis, commissioned by the World Health Organization and which informed a change to its treatment guidelines, has been published in The Lancet. The study provides compelling evidence that artemether-lumefantrine should now replace quinine as the treatment of choice in the first trimester.

Bacterial infections linked to one in eight global deaths, according to GRAM study

Data showing 7.7 million deaths from 33 bacterial infections can guide measures to strengthen health systems, particularly in low-income settings

Letter from the hills: The invisible burden of leprosy in Sumba

OUCRU Indonesia launches a new exhibition by photographer Yoppy Pieter based in Jakarta, Indonesia. This exhibition documents, through a series of intimate and beautiful images, the invisible burden of leprosy and other skin diseases in Sumba, an island in Nusa Tenggara Timor province, Indonesia.