Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

A downloadable resource for educators, health & research professionals to help develop young peoples’ understanding of AMR and positive actions they can take to mitigate it.

Child showing coronaviruses drawn on her hand, with pills, and a red cross drawn on a adult hand © Stutika Thapa Shrestha YAAR! Youth working group Nepal

Working in partnership with young people in Kenya, Vietnam, Thailand and Nepal, a team from the Oxford Tropical Network have developed a learning resource to support educators, health professionals and researchers as they work with children and youth to better understand AMR.

Download 'An Antimicrobial Resistance Learning Framework for Children and Young People' on the Zenodo website

Solutions to the emerging challenge of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) will require ideas and actions from a wide range of people including children and young people.  In order for them to meaningfully engage with the challenge and contribute to solutions, they need a clear understanding of AMR, its causes, effects and current strategies for mitigation.  This learning framework is a resource for teachers, educators, research scientists and informal learning providers to enable them to develop young peoples’ understanding of:

  • The science behind AMR
  • The individual, community and global health risks AMR presents
  • The positive actions they can take to mitigate against AMR

The framework identifies key learning outcomes appropriate to different age groups that are applicable across a diverse range of settings and learning environments. It can be used as a tool for structuring curricula and learning activities.

This framework was developed by the Youth Against Antimicrobial Resistance (YAAR!) team who includes researchers, engagement practioners, young people and teachers. The team was led by Dr Mary Chambers in Vietnam, Mr Vu Duy Thanh, Prof Phaik Yeong Cheah in Thailand, Prof Sam Kinyanjui in Kenya, Dr Alun Davis in Oxford and Prof Abhilasha Karkey in Nepal.  The project was commissioned by Wellcome Education team in partnership with the Drug Resistant Infections team. 

Visit the YAAR! website for more information

Fleming’s plate: A poem by Alex Hinga and read by Joyce MwanzaFleming’s plate: A poem by Alex Hinga and read by Joyce Mwanza

Similar stories

The global burden of Plasmodium vivax malaria is obscure and insidious

Until recently, Plasmodium falciparum dominated the malaria research landscape, and Plasmodium vivax infection was considered benign and inconsequential. We now know that this is not true: if not properly diagnosed and treated, P. vivax can lead to life-threatening syndromes and death. Professor Kevin Baird from EOCRU in Jakarta, Indonesia talks to OutBreak News Today

Pint of Science Thailand is back, now online

Live and on-line from Bangkok! Be ready for Thursday 13th May, when Pint of Science Thailand will stream live from Bangkok. Join us via Facebook, YouTube or right here from the Pint of Science Thailand website as we journey from bacterial infections to viruses, discover how clinical trials work, and how scientific development is seen in the eyes of the law!

Celebrating women in ICT: connected girls, creating brighter futures

The International Girl’s in ICT day is commemorated to create awareness on the critical need for more girls and women in the ICT sector, encourage and inspire young girls to actively pursue careers in STEM as well as engage the community to promote collaboration through partnerships. Kathreen Wafula, an ICT Support Technician in Kilifi, joins a strong team of techies and is one of the 4 women in the department.

Communicating with communities for World Immunisation Week 2021

World Immunization Week highlights the role vaccinations play in improving the health of communities. As the COVID pandemic continues to impact countries worldwide, governments are facing challenges related to coverage, equity and sustainability of routine immunisation alongside access and the particular maintenance requirements related to the SARS-CoV-2 vaccines. Communication with communities has been key to ensure continued engagement with the vaccine programs despite the challenges of current contexts.

Innovative strategies for engaging communities with malaria research

For World Malaria Day 2021, F1000 Research Blog spoke to Professor Phaik Yeong Cheah about her research focussed on drama and arts-based community engagement for malaria research, published with Wellcome Open Research.

Community and Public Engagement at KWTRP

KWTRP initial community and public engagement strategy was developed in 2005 with three goals: build understanding and trust between researchers and communities, enhance ethical conduct of research, and disseminate research findings to promote uptake into policy. Our programme has since developed and now includes engagement with media, radio programme, media engagement workshops, various meetings and forums, and a fully-fledged school engagement programme that was awarded the 2019 Oxford VC Public Engagement with Research Award.