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A downloadable resource for educators, health & research professionals to help develop young peoples’ understanding of AMR and positive actions they can take to mitigate it.

Child showing coronaviruses drawn on her hand, with pills, and a red cross drawn on a adult hand © Stutika Thapa Shrestha YAAR! Youth working group Nepal

Working in partnership with young people in Kenya, Vietnam, Thailand and Nepal, a team from the Oxford Tropical Network have developed a learning resource to support educators, health professionals and researchers as they work with children and youth to better understand AMR.

Download 'An Antimicrobial Resistance Learning Framework for Children and Young People' on the Zenodo website

Solutions to the emerging challenge of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) will require ideas and actions from a wide range of people including children and young people.  In order for them to meaningfully engage with the challenge and contribute to solutions, they need a clear understanding of AMR, its causes, effects and current strategies for mitigation.  This learning framework is a resource for teachers, educators, research scientists and informal learning providers to enable them to develop young peoples’ understanding of:

  • The science behind AMR
  • The individual, community and global health risks AMR presents
  • The positive actions they can take to mitigate against AMR

The framework identifies key learning outcomes appropriate to different age groups that are applicable across a diverse range of settings and learning environments. It can be used as a tool for structuring curricula and learning activities.

This framework was developed by the Youth Against Antimicrobial Resistance (YAAR!) team who includes researchers, engagement practioners, young people and teachers. The team was led by Dr Mary Chambers in Vietnam, Mr Vu Duy Thanh, Prof Phaik Yeong Cheah in Thailand, Prof Sam Kinyanjui in Kenya, Dr Alun Davis in Oxford and Prof Abhilasha Karkey in Nepal.  The project was commissioned by Wellcome Education team in partnership with the Drug Resistant Infections team. 

Visit the YAAR! website for more information

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