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Mary Chambers (OUCRU Public Engagement Vietnam) and Gill Black (Sustainable Livelihood Foundation, South Africa) have partnered with The Global Health Network training centre to published this online course and handbook

Children © Fact & Fiction Films 2011
A young participant of the P(L)ace of Change digital-story project practises taking photos

This course and handbook (available as a downloadable PDF or in print) provides guidelines on the practice and ethics of participatory visual methods (PVM) with emphasis on their use in low and middle-income countries for community and public engagement in health and health science. It has been developed for use by engagement practitioners who are relatively new to the field of PVM and want to learn more about what they are and how to work with them. It is most fitting for those who already have some experience in facilitating participatory processes or in using qualitative research methods. The handbook also aims to support health science researchers who wish to include visual methods when engaging local communities and wider publics in their work. This work was supported by Wellcome (209586/Z/17/Z) and an OUCRU Seed Award.

To take the course online, visit the Global Health Network website

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