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The incidence of malaria has continued to drop dramatically in remote rural villages in Myanmar after community workers trained only to detect and treat malaria began providing basic health care as well as malaria services, researchers affiliated with MOCRU, our Myanmar-Oxford Clinical Research Unit, have said.

A health worker performs a blood test on a child at a clinic near the Thai-Myanmar border. For more than a decade, the fast-acting artemisinin has been a potent weapon against malaria, but there are fears that resistance to the drug is spreading. Photo: AFP / Pornchai Kittiwongsakul

A health worker performs a blood test on a child at a clinic near the Thai-Myanmar border. For more than a decade, the fast-acting artemisinin has been a potent weapon against malaria, but there are fears that resistance to the drug is spreading.

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