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Professor Trudie Lang is Highly Commended for 'Enabling Research in Low-Income Settings During Disease Outbreaks: Implementing, Learning and Preparing' in the Building Capacity category of the University Vice-Chancellor Innovation Awards 2020.

Trudie Lang and the Vice-Chancellor's Innovation Awards logo

Congratulations to Professor Trudie Lang who has been Highly Commended in the Building Capacity category of the Vice-Chancellor Innovation Awards 2020 for her work on Enabling Research in Low-Income Settings During Disease Outbreaks: Implementing, Learning and Preparing.

The Vice-Chancellor Innovation Awards celebrate research-led innovation that is having societal or economic impact. Building on the awards two years ago a new category of Policy Engagement has been added to those for TeamworkBuilding CapacityInspiring Leadership, and Early Career Innovator.

Winners and Highly Commended entries were selected by the Vice-Chancellor’s Innovation Awards panel chaired by Professor Chas Bountra, Pro-Vice-Chancellor for Innovation, and comprising academics from each of the four Divisions and Professional Services staff who support impact and innovation across the collegiate University

You can find out more about the Awards and all of 2020’s Winners and Highly Commended entries on the Vice-Chancellor’s Innovation Awards pages.

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