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The success of vaccination programs depends largely on the mechanisms used in vaccine delivery. National immunization programs offer childhood vaccines through fixed and outreach services within the health system and often, additional supplementary immunization activities (SIAs) are undertaken to fill gaps and boost coverage. Here, we map predicted coverage at 1 × 1 km spatial resolution in five low- and middle-income countries to identify areas that are under-vaccinated via each delivery method using Demographic and Health Surveys data. We compare estimates of the coverage of the third dose of diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis-containing vaccine (DTP3), which is typically delivered through routine immunization (RI), with those of measles-containing vaccine (MCV) for which SIAs are also undertaken. We find that SIAs have boosted MCV coverage in some places, but not in others, particularly where RI had been deficient, as depicted by DTP coverage. The modelling approaches outlined here can help to guide geographical prioritization and strategy design.

Original publication

DOI

10.1038/s41467-019-09611-1

Type

Journal

Nature communications

Publication Date

09/04/2019

Volume

10

Addresses

WorldPop, School of Geography and Environmental Science, University of Southampton, Southampton, SO17 1BJ, UK. c.e.utazi@soton.ac.uk.

Keywords

Humans, Diphtheria-Tetanus-Pertussis Vaccine, Measles Vaccine, Multivariate Analysis, Models, Statistical, Demography, Child, Preschool, Infant, Infant, Newborn, Income, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Mozambique, Nigeria, Cambodia, Mass Vaccination, Global Health, Datasets as Topic, Strategic Planning, Vaccination Coverage